Pregnancy Discrimination - Interview

  1. 4
    I have read more than a few threads on here and quite frankly I am a little appauled at the attitudes. No wonder women ask if they should hide the pregnancy! They're discriminated by female nursing collegues right from the start and treated as though it were 1950. "No, you should wait until after you have the baby." Well, I think most nurses on here are used to a higher standard of living than a cardboard box, and that's what happens when you can't pay bills. I have an interview scheduled soon and still waver on what to do. It is for a per diem position and it is not an oncology floor. I think honesty is best, but in this economy, just because I'm pregnant doesn't mean I want to put nursing on hold for a year while my skills dwindle. It's already competitive enough! I could understand the NM being worried about staffing shortages, but I never called off a day in my previous position...why would I call in sick now(my horrible vomiting has passed.) Here's hoping I have decent luck with per diem.
    Joe V, CallieNM, lindarn, and 1 other like this.

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  2. 107 Comments...

  3. 5
    Quote from whitey_fisk
    I have read more than a few threads on here and quite frankly I am a little appauled at the attitudes. No wonder women ask if they should hide the pregnancy! They're discriminated by female nursing collegues right from the start and treated as though it were 1950. "No, you should wait until after you have the baby." Well, I think most nurses on here are used to a higher standard of living than a cardboard box, and that's what happens when you can't pay bills. I have an interview scheduled soon and still waver on what to do. It is for a per diem position and it is not an oncology floor. I think honesty is best, but in this economy, just because I'm pregnant doesn't mean I want to put nursing on hold for a year while my skills dwindle. It's already competitive enough! I could understand the NM being worried about staffing shortages, but I never called off a day in my previous position...why would I call in sick now(my horrible vomiting has passed.) Here's hoping I have decent luck with per diem.
    Is this your first job?

    If you're not showing, I wouldn't say anything.

    Don't give them the chance to discriminate and not hire you.

    Good luck.
    MochaRN424, Pistachio, NyteshiftLVN, and 2 others like this.
  4. 0
    Hi Mulan,

    No, this is not my first job. I am showing...I'm 5 and a half months, but not too big.
  5. 3
    Quote from whitey_fisk
    Hi Mulan,

    No, this is not my first job. I am showing...I'm 5 and a half months, but not too big.
    Depending on how you are carrying it might be possible to hide it with the right out fit.
    Most people don't notice your "bump" as much as you do, if they don't already know your pregnant they tend to not spend to much time focusing on your tummy.
    I'm 8 months pregnant, and even now the right shirt makes all the difference. I'm sure if people don't believe that I'm pregnant when I wear a peasant top you can find the right shirt too!

    As far as jobs you need to remember any lifting limits you have.

    Have you considered working directly for a family? Thats what I'm doing right now, and since I report directly to the mother, it is much more flexible. I make the same per hour that I made as an aid (obviously you are a nurse so you should charge more) in a facility, but I only have one "patient" who comes to my house. Its great because it isn't as stressful or physiclly demanding, and once I give birth, instead of having to take time off (which I can't afford) or leave my newborn with a sitter (which I can't afford or emotionally handle) I can be with my baby and continue working since I work from home. I'm sure you can get what ever job you want, I just thought I'd let you know that there are some more flexible options than facility work.

    Good luck with your job hunt and your baby!
    mzmae, Art_Vandelay, and love_myfamily like this.
  6. 13
    I have a friend who is a nurse manager that has some responsibility over hiring and firing at the facility where she is employed.

    Although she will never publicly admit this, she disclosed to me that she will not hire nurses to permanent full-time or part-time positions if she is aware that they are pregnant. At the most, she will offer them a PRN/per diem/casual position while pregnant, then offer them a full-time permanent position after the employee has given birth.

    What is her reasoning for secretly refusing to hire pregnant women into full-time positions? She says it will result in staffing holes down the line when they go out on maternity leave. However, she will hire pregnant women into PRN positions because of the flexibility involved and the minimal commitment that characterizes this type of employment.
    SmilingBluEyes, SweettartRN, Elladora, and 10 others like this.
  7. 3
    Yes, unfortunately, that's the way it goes.

    You have to look at the employer's perspective. They are worried about staff shortages, liabilities and potential lawsuits ~ and since that guides their decision making ~ you have to make this situation work to your best advantage.

    Good luck to you, and I hope all goes well.
  8. 26
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I have a friend who is a nurse manager that has some responsibility over hiring and firing at the facility where she is employed.

    Although she will never publicly admit this, she disclosed to me that she will not hire nurses to permanent full-time or part-time positions if she is aware that they are pregnant. At the most, she will offer them a PRN/per diem/casual position while pregnant, then offer them a full-time permanent position after the employee has given birth.

    What is her reasoning for secretly refusing to hire pregnant women into full-time positions? She says it will result in staffing holes down the line when they go out on maternity leave. However, she will hire pregnant women into PRN positions because of the flexibility involved and the minimal commitment that characterizes this type of employment.
    Argh...isn't that horrible to admit. Let's see...5 months pregnant now so add 4 more months...well that equals Christmas time. Now pretend YOU are the hiring/staff manager. How are you going to cover the holidays AND a LOA? Often it is the long term employees that gets screwed into working to cover the shortage at the very time that they want (and deserve) to get extra time off.

    Seriously - it is only fair to look at both sides of this issue. Remember, it may be YOU that gets stuck with the extra shifts all the while that new employee gets Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years off.

    A manager has to see the whole picture and sometimes it doesn't lead to fun choices for anyone.
    SmilingBluEyes, TiddlDwink, jtmarcy12, and 23 others like this.
  9. 3
    I will say it again. You may be missing out on a fantastic nurse, just to avoid a two month pregnancy leave. The nurse you hire may not be pregnant, but may decide to start their family once they get hired. Or, you may hire someone with call off problems, or a secret drub abuse problem. We should all be ashamed that this is even an issue in 2012.
  10. 10
    Quote from ShayRN
    I will say it again. You may be missing out on a fantastic nurse, just to avoid a two month pregnancy leave. The nurse you hire may not be pregnant, but may decide to start their family once they get hired. Or, you may hire someone with call off problems, or a secret drub abuse problem. We should all be ashamed that this is even an issue in 2012.
    No doubt, it really is a shame. Just for the record, I DID hire a pregnant nurse and she WILL be out at Christmas time and she is a GREAT nurse and my staff likes her and my staff (that have years of seniority) have already figured out she will be out for all of the holidays and they will get stuck and they are not happy with me.

    Now I am in a small LTC, I only have a couple PRN nurses and for the most part they refuse to pick up when I really need them. My company does not allow me to use any type of agency, nor would I want to anyways. I am in the process of trying to hire someone in advance but I really can't offer them much now and I can't make promises for after the holidays so as a result...no one wants the position. Can you see the other side of this dilemma?
  11. 10
    Many pregnant nurses play the "I'm pregnant card". That's probably why managers are wary to hire them.


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