Pregnancy Discrimination - Interview - page 6

by Art_Vandelay | 19,681 Views | 107 Comments

I have read more than a few threads on here and quite frankly I am a little appauled at the attitudes. No wonder women ask if they should hide the pregnancy! They're discriminated by female nursing collegues right from the... Read More


  1. 5
    Eh. Why get pregnant when you know that you'll be job hunting soon/now? Is getting pregnant when you can't afford to pay your bills a good idea, really?

    Biggest problem my unit has had when hiring pregnant nurses is that they orientate, or semi-orientate, then they're off for 8-9 weeks and come back needing to be totally re-orientated to the unit, basically. Some are hired as full-time, staffed as full-time, then decide after having the kiddo that they want to go part-time.
    SweettartRN, NoonieRN, linzjane88, and 2 others like this.
  2. 5
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    It's a difficult position to be in. Telling the truth might eliminate you from consideration, but withholding the truth might really burn some bridges.

    I hired a new MA last week and she started on Tuesday. She told me Tuesday morning that she is 3 months pregnant. I was furious, because no, I wouldn't have hired her if I knew that. Having a float MA who doesn't know my routine and preferences screws my entire day to pieces, and I am not going to do that for 6 to 12 consecutive weeks. She suspected as much and told me that is why she didn't mention it during the interviews. What she didn't think through is that she has a 90 probation period. Guess what, she isn't going to make it that far. We decided within 2 hours of getting the happy news that we are going to let her go tomorrow afternoon.
    I could never trust her or believe anything she tells me, because I now know she tells truths selectively, to benefit herself. I can't work with someone I don't trust; the stakes are too high and my responsibility too great. Before the end of her probation period I don't need a reason, and she will just be told "we are not a good fit, it isn't working out," yada yada yada. It isn't the pregnacy so much as the dishonesty and self serving approach. So, with the subsequent total lack of trust and respect, no, she and I aren't a good fit. Worse for her still, she's done with the whole company, forever. We are the largest consortium of providers in the state, and no one will touch her. If she had told the truth I probably wouldn't have hired her, but someone else might have, if not now perhaps after the delivery. Now she's totally screwed.

    So think about your options very carefully. Good luck.
    This entire post is just gross to me. No wonder she didn't tell you. Because you wouldn't have hired her anyway. And now you've blacklisted her. Lovely.
    beeker, NyteshiftLVN, Elladora, and 2 others like this.
  3. 4
    Quote from whitey_fisk
    The truth is that pregnancy discrimination would be very hard to prove, especially in this economy with its glut of nurses.
    Unless, of course, they come to AN and announce that's why they didn't hire the person.
  4. 1
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    Not being mean here, being real. Why would an employer want to hire a pregnant girl, give them insurance, and then hold their job when they take FML? Per Diem work is what I'd go for.
    I dunno, because some employers are decent? And family friendly? And recognize that they are valuable employees and worth it?
    Art_Vandelay likes this.
  5. 7
    Wouldn't giving special treatment, assignments and desirable days off to pregnant women be the equivalent of discriminating against those who are NOT pregnant? Just wondering. And giving preferable days off or easier assignments or jobs to those who are pregnant in order to be "family friendly" is a ridiculous way of looking at it. Most of us have a family, whether or not we have children or are pregnant.
    SmilingBluEyes, RNsRWe, NoonieRN, and 4 others like this.
  6. 2
    Quote from not.done.yet
    Wouldn't giving special treatment, assignments and desirable days off to pregnant women be the equivalent of discriminating against those who are NOT pregnant? Just wondering. And giving preferable days off or easier assignments or jobs to those who are pregnant in order to be "family friendly" is a ridiculous way of looking at it. Most of us have a family, whether or not we have children or are pregnant.
    People who are not in any sort of protected class can't be discriminated against, in the legal sense. It's unfortunate for those of us who don't have kids, or are men, but that's life. I had to lol at the above saying facilities would open themselves to "reverse discrimination;" good luck with that one, pal!

    They should NOT be getting easier assignments. If they couldn't do the job their doctor should have written them off. On my floor we have a detailed sheet each shift that each nurse fills out giving their patients' issues like contact precautions, PICCs, confused, fall risk, and the level of nursing care needed for each patient, and we also keep a record of each day's assignments, so it could easily be shown to HR that a pregnant person is constantly sucking up all the min's and mod's. If I felt for a second that someone was constantly receiving a disproportionate assignment I'd be the first person discussing it. In reality though, even working with a crew that at one time had 4 pregnant women on it, I have never felt that way.
    Fiona59 and Meriwhen like this.
  7. 1
    The pregnant employee I spoke of earlier was definitely given preferential treatment; she was always assigned the easiest patients and never had to do any lifting. She was babied and milked it. (Pun intended.). But that's not what I'm going to do.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  8. 1
    [QUOTE=not.done.yet;6904525]Wouldn't giving special treatment, assignments and desirable days off to pregnant women be the equivalent of discriminating against those who are NOT pregnant? Just wondering. And giving preferable days off or easier assignments or jobs to those who are pregnantit all in order to be "family friendly" is a ridiculous way of looking at it. Most of us have a family, whether or not we have children or are pregnant.[

    You said it all!!!

    I have a suggestion - since we're talking reduced job duties for pregnant employees, how about REDUCED WAGES for them ??? Say, half-wages? Would that be fair?? You'll get paid only for the reduced, lessened work load.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Eh. Why get pregnant when you know that you'll be job hunting soon/now? Is getting pregnant when you can't afford to pay your bills a good idea, really?
    Not knowing the OP's circumstances, keep in mind that not all pregnancies are timed with precision or even planned in the first place. And birth control has been known to fail.

    Sometimes it just happens.
    Elladora and Art_Vandelay like this.
  10. 7
    Those considering simultaneous job-seeking and pregnancy, who are responsible for their own employer-provided health insurance, should carefully investigate the possibility that their new employer's insurance excludes maternal benefits for the first 6 months to 1 year.

    And, recalling my own pregnancy-induced hypertension, required bedrest, and c-section always makes me chuckle when I read of those who just *know* that they will work up until their delivery date, and return to work within a couple of week after delivery, *for sure*. Life is what happens when you're making other plans.
    NyteshiftLVN, Dazglue, amoLucia, and 4 others like this.


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