The job market is tough... "How tough is it?" - page 3

by Guttercat

3,146 Views | 28 Comments

It's so tough that you get a rejection email before you've even submitted the application. I was only half way through the application (no where near completion, let alone electronically signing a submission) when I... Read More


  1. 2
    How tough is it? Even 1-star nursing homes want 1 year of experience.
    SE_BSN_RN and Guttercat like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from sandangel2001
    How tough is it? I have a Masters - Awards up the Wazoo - perfect GPA - letters of recommendation - numerous advance certification and I can't get a job.
    I am getting close to saying - done and going back to Sales.

    dejected, and rejected in Cali
    Is your masters in nursing?
  3. 1
    Quote from sandangel2001
    How tough is it? I have a Masters - Awards up the Wazoo - perfect GPA - letters of recommendation - numerous advance certification and I can't get a job.
    I am getting close to saying - done and going back to Sales.

    dejected, and rejected in Cali
    Like Esme, I'm also curious.

    Do you have previous nursing experience, or are you a new grad RN with a Master's in another field?

    "Numerous Advanced Certifications" leads me to believe you have experience. If so, I wonder if you are "over-qualified" (<<< read that: "Too expensive and knows too much about the inner shenanigans of the industry.")
    hope3456 likes this.
  4. 1
    It's so tough that......(Johnny Carson....)
    Guttercat likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Guttercat
    Like Esme, I'm also curious.

    Do you have previous nursing experience, or are you a new grad RN with a Master's in another field?

    "Numerous Advanced Certifications" leads me to believe you have experience. If so, I wonder if you are "over-qualified" (<<< read that: "Too expensive and knows too much about the inner shenanigans of the industry.")
    there are entry level MSN programs where your scope of practice is an RN but you have an MSN rather than a BSN.
  6. 1
    Sorry for the late reply, I have a BSN and Masters in public health along with 20+ years of pharmaceutical sales management.
    But still no stinking job.
    Guttercat likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from sandangel2001
    Sorry for the late reply, I have a BSN and Masters in public health along with 20+ years of pharmaceutical sales management. But still no stinking job.
    With all that experience, hiring managers might be intimidated of you. You might want to tone it down a bit.
  8. 1
    It's not grim everywhere.

    If you ever read Forbes Magazine or Wall Street Journal about the best cities/states to work after the recession you will get an idea.

    Some states like Arizona or Texas are doing well, other states like Illinois are doing poorly (Chicago job market sucks--no. 3 worst in the nation---unless you love nursing homes, which the city has 1 million).

    It seems a lot of people who are posting on these boards complaining they can't find work come from Illinois and specifically Chicago area.

    The most disadvantaged nurses are those who are stuck in a city with a nasty job market but cannot move to another part of the country because of a family situation, children in school, etc. If you can move, take advantage of it. The relocation cost could be several grand, but it will pay itself many times over in the future.

    If I had any friends or relatives in Arizona or Texas or Colorado I'd move in an instant--I'd find work too. The only reason I don't want to move is because I'm a bachelor (just broke up with my GF) and I'm anxious of being alone in a strange state and having nobody to talk to. I'm envious of people who have friends and family in other parts of the country because they can live anywhere they want and still have a friend there.
    Last edit by Concerto_in_C on Mar 12
    Guttercat likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Concerto_in_C
    It's not grim everywhere.

    If you ever read Forbes Magazine or Wall Street Journal about the best cities/states to work after the recession you will get an idea.

    Some states like Arizona or Texas are doing well, other states like Illinois are doing poorly (Chicago job market sucks--no. 3 worst in the nation---unless you love nursing homes, which the city has 1 million).

    It seems a lot of people who are posting on these boards complaining they can't find work come from Illinois and specifically Chicago area.

    The most disadvantaged nurses are those who are stuck in a city with a nasty job market but cannot move to another part of the country because of a family situation, children in school, etc. If you can move, take advantage of it. The relocation cost could be several grand, but it will pay itself many times over in the future.

    If I had any friends or relatives in Arizona or Texas or Colorado I'd move in an instant--I'd find work too. The only reason I don't want to move is because I'm a bachelor (just broke up with my GF) and I'm anxious of being alone in a strange state and having nobody to talk to. I'm envious of people who have friends and family in other parts of the country because they can live anywhere they want and still have a friend there.
    Don't be nervous about moving to another state. I know exactly how you're feeling. I moved to Texas without family and I'm doing fine. I've met someone, engaged, baby on the way and about to attend nursing school.

    Take things one step at a time. Save money to move, move out of state and find an apt/job. Yes its easier said than done but I was able to do it. Don't give yourself a ball of anxiety before you take the leap because thats what I did. (Smile) You're going to fine.


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