How to ask for your old job back

  1. 0
    I left a hospital that I truly enjoyed working at but hated the drive. So from 30 minutes each way, I now go 8 minutes each. However, the hospital that I left, is so much nicer, cleaner and I miss it and truly regret leaving. I did leave them with 2 weeks and said it was the drive. The manager seemed disappointed. After one month, I now want to ask for my old job back. How do I write in an email? Or should I just pretty much say what I just wrote? Thanks
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 5
    You do NOT send an email. You go over there and speak to your NM in person. But don't be surprised if she's already replaced you; tell her you'd come back whenever she needs you, and hope for the best. Also realize that the folks that hired you a month ago are gonna be pretty annoyed at you. Be prepared to stick out wherever you end up for at least a year, and let that be a lesson to you.

    30 minutes' drive? Nothing. How many folks here would kill for a good job with a half-hour commute.
  5. 0
    This is my exact dilema. I am going to email the nurse recruiter, because management has changed. All I can do is send my resume and ask....
  6. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    You do NOT send an email. You go over there and speak to your NM in person. But don't be surprised if she's already replaced you; tell her you'd come back whenever she needs you, and hope for the best. Also realize that the folks that hired you a month ago are gonna be pretty annoyed at you. Be prepared to stick out wherever you end up for at least a year, and let that be a lesson to you. 30 minutes' drive? Nothing. How many folks here would kill for a good job with a half-hour commute.
    This exactly. I just left a job I mostly liked but sometimes was frustrated by but ultimately really enjoyed because the commute was 90 minutes. 30 minutes is nothing. I regret my decision but my director took my leaving very personally, so despite giving 3 weeks notice on top of being candid about my trouble with the commute in advance of that, still managed to leave on bad terms with her. And with the way the former boss handles people leaving, I definitely don't want to screw over my new job because I need at least 1 good reference. Something to consider for down the road- you might need to tough it out.
  7. 1
    You call or go in person and grovel just a touch: not groveling to the point of humiliation, but more like "the grass really was greener here, I'm sorry I left, I'd really like to come back if I can." Then you wait and see.

    You have nothing to lose by trying. However, the reality is that there's no shortage of applicants out there and your old job has probably been or is about to be filled. So as a safety precaution, don't quit your current job just yet--that way if the first job doesn't take you back right now, you still have a job somewhere.

    Also consider the fact that your old employer may be wary--and RIGHTFULLY so--that you may pull the same stunt again. So like the others have said: if they do take you back, you need to give that job a full year come hell or high water. Pull the same stunt twice and you could do serious damage to both your career and your credibility.

    Best of luck.
    not.done.yet likes this.
  8. 0
    Are you re-hireable? 2 weeks notice and nurse manager was disappointed. hmm. I just wonder that first. Was your old facility okay with 2 week notice?

    In my facility, you are not rehireable if you give less than 1 month notice.


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