When to report a classmaste to your clinical instructor. - page 4

We are in our last semester of nursing school and it has become aparent, in our first week of our new rotation that one of our classmates does/did not know how to do perform some clinical skills. I... Read More

  1. by   rsh3rn
    Quote from Gompers
    Thanks! I wondered if maybe RNs might do this in the pediatric/adult setting, but to have a student doing something like that...talk about liability!!!

    Of course, where I work the PICC lines are thinner than dental floss (<2fr) and we've had incidents where docs have DC'd lines that broke off into the baby, requiring emergency trips to nuclear medicine and even the OR. This is why, as a nurse, I refuse to pull one.
    Per our hospital PICC's can be pulled by any trained RN as are most central or Arterial lines, this only applies to adults that are reasonably stable and there is a policy stating the procedure in our handbook I see no reason that a student couldn't do this, under supervision of course
  2. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from markbeast
    I think you need a time out.


    I can see how you might think so after what I wrote!

    I apologize for missing your comments in the first post that, in fact, you and the other student DID correct this student in clinical.

    It makes me wonder how nurses in cultures where saving face and consensus is very important, such as the Japanese culture. Sometimes seeding information can be helpful--say, saying to the instructor, "Can we go over the priming of the IVs again in class; another student and I were uncertain." (Depending upon whether you have sufficient lack of ego to do that; sometimes it is hard to do as a student when we students are trying to impress our instructors with our competence!!) A lot of people can learn better if they don't feel defensive--and some people have bad days. I know it can seem scary when you feel patients' lives are at risk--but, ultimately, it is the instructor's license and the instructor's call. If a student is terribly unsafe, it won't be something that can be hidden from the instructor, imo. Personally, I'm amazed--and very thankful--that anyone is willing to take on students on their license!!!

    That reminds me that I need to thank my instructors!!! They can't be thanked enough!

    NurseFirst
    Last edit by NurseFirst on Mar 11, '05
  3. by   jaimealmostRN
    Umm, I think an unprimed IV tubing IS a life and death issue. Although a PB tubing isn't very long, this student may not understand the importance of priming ANY tubing, giving her/his pt a PE. But I think the OP could mention to the teacher that maybe he/she could supervise a little better (in a nicer way of course ). Students can be involved in lawsuits ,so this is to the students benefit. And why there is not really anything wrong with giving heparin in an insulin syringe, a student shouldn't be doing it that way. It most likely means that they do not know the difference...but I guess only talking to this student would be the best way to answer these questions. Good luck.
  4. by   chilloutrelax
    interesting how you think to go to the instructor, and not the student. My class is like a family, and I know other nursing schools are the same way. I would talk to the student. If you want to go to the instructor, I would tell the instructor she needs to review hanging an IV with the clinical group, because I have seen some mistakes made recently. I would actually refuse to say the name of the student, unless the instructor forced me. Also, as someone else mentioned....why would another student sit there and watch another student make a mistake? What is that about? I think you need an attitude adjustment. You are there to learn, not to compete with other students and tell on them like children. It's very important to help the other classmates out, it's a learning experience for all of you. I think your instructor may find fault with you for allowing her to do something wrong and just sitting there and letting it happen! (I'll bet you money on it!) I'm glad your not in my class.
  5. by   markbeast
    Quote from chilloutrelax
    interesting how you think to go to the instructor, and not the student. My class is like a family, and I know other nursing schools are the same way. I would talk to the student. If you want to go to the instructor, I would tell the instructor she needs to review hanging an IV with the clinical group, because I have seen some mistakes made recently. I would actually refuse to say the name of the student, unless the instructor forced me. Also, as someone else mentioned....why would another student sit there and watch another student make a mistake? What is that about? I think you need an attitude adjustment. You are there to learn, not to compete with other students and tell on them like children. It's very important to help the other classmates out, it's a learning experience for all of you. I think your instructor may find fault with you for allowing her to do something wrong and just sitting there and letting it happen! (I'll bet you money on it!) I'm glad your not in my class.
    Have you actually read this thread?

    You may want to chill out and relax...

close