What other profession floats? - page 2

What other profession besides nurses float? Janitors- their job-I couldn't do without them, is fairly standardized. Teachers- even teachers have substitutes. Secretaries- well, they can't kill... Read More

  1. by   BBFRN
    I'm actually liking floating to other floors these days. Get this- Thursday night, I got pulled from my regular 30 bed Trauma floor (leaving them with 2 RN's and 2 LPN's- that was 9 patients each for the LPN's, 5 for the charge nurse, and 7 for the other RN) to a 24 bed medical floor where I was the only LPN working with 4 RN's. I had 5 patients who weren't as critical as I would've had on my floor. At first I was irritated at getting pulled, then after I saw my patient load as compared to what I would've had, I think I'm going to consider transferring to that floor!
  2. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    I have floated to PACU from OR
    Other units from the floor, but Im comfortable with where Im going and what Im doing. If I was going somewhere I wasnt comfortable with, I would just let them know and if that didnt do anything I would turn in my resignation. I wont allow someone or some hospital jepordize what I have worked so hard to achieve.
    Its just asking for a mistake because of the unfamiliar territory, and ways that the floor or unit works.
    Zoe
  3. by   OC_An Khe
    Just say no. Fergus has the correct approach.
    This floating issue will not go away until we the staff nurses make it go away.
    You can only be abused if you let some one abuse you.
  4. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    The guy that pumps my gas. He also floats with a windsheild washer and washes the front windsheild and then he floats to the back one and washes it too. Other than that I dont know one that does.
    Zoe
  5. by   BBFRN
    I have a hypothetical question for those of you more experienced nurses. Could the hospital consider a refusal to be floated to another floor (after you have clocked in) a patient abandonment issue if they are in critical staffing mode? I had a charge nurse tell me that they thought this could be the case, and I was wondering if it was true. To me, it seems that you would have to receive report on those patients first.
  6. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    Report has to be given to you about the patients, if not you have recieved no patients, you can clock out and go home without the chance of patient abandonment. But however you will most likely be with out a job.
    That I know of from personal experience and I called the state boards to find out and I called from the Nursing desk before I clocked out. I want fired but I was repremanded pretty hard and I would do it again.
    Zoe
  7. by   Going80INA55
    Yah, it really does depend on where you are floating from and to.

    I worked on the floor from hell, step-down, and on rare occasions I would be floated. It was wonderful, because any floor in the hospital was a breath of fresh air compared to that place.
  8. by   BBFRN
    Originally posted by Going80INA55
    Yah, it really does depend on where you are floating from and to.

    I worked on the floor from hell, step-down, and on rare occasions I would be floated. It was wonderful, because any floor in the hospital was a breath of fresh air compared to that place.
    I know, that's how I'm feeling these days, too. Is that what gave you the gumption to change to something else? They have an opening on the last floor I got floated to, and it's looking like an option.
  9. by   Brita01
    Next time someone asks you to float, thank them very much for the experience they're giving you, because now you have the experience you need to go out and work confidently for a nursing AGENCY.

    Way back when I left my hospital staff position, I figured that if I would have to float, I might as well get paid for it.
  10. by   BBFRN
    Originally posted by Brita01
    Next time someone asks you to float, thank them very much for the experience they're giving you, because now you have the experience you need to go out and work confidently for a nursing AGENCY.

    Way back when I left my hospital staff position, I figured that if I would have to float, I might as well get paid for it.
    Amen to that!
  11. by   Going80INA55
    yes, that is one of the main things that gave me the courage to leave bedside nursing. i figured if i was good enough to float anywhere in the hospital, then i could do anything.

    besides once i floated to other floors it gave me more experience. i did agency for awhile and enjoyed it. but then my personality is such that i like change.
  12. by   catrn10
    I am an agency Nurse now because of that very thing. I work in ICU only. Period.
  13. by   JWaldron
    The hospital I work at has a float pool for Med-Surg, Peds, Rehab, same-day surgery, endoscopy (recovery), Oncology, PCU (stepdown)and Mother-Baby (not L&D or Nursery). For PCU you have to be able to read the monitors, and for Mother-Baby you have to have neonatal CPR, and in Oncology you don't do the chemo; there is another group of nurses (Unit Comps) who float between the ICU, the ER and also PCU.

    I worked in the regular float pool for 2 years, right out of school. It was a hell of a way to get your skills developement - no real mentor, a different area every shift, a different way of doing things in each unit (corporate culture, if you will), and I don't know that I would recommend that to anybody, but you do get a broad range of skills if you survive it. There are advantages to floating - the broad skill developement, you get to know everybody, you know what managers you DON'T want to work for and the ones you DO, you don't get involved in the unit politics, and you get invited to everybody's Christmas party, or at least, I did. When I floated, there was no float differential, but now there is; I believe it is a dollar an hour, but could be wrong.

    Now there is something nefarious afoot, and we are suddenly being 'cross-trained' to work other floors (I work Rehab now). There has been no explanation of the reason for this, but it concerns me, because staffing and sups see Rehab as the float pool extension since we staff differently - our patients don't stay in bed, we don't give them bedpans, we get them up and ambulate them to the BR, or get them into their braces and w/c them there, many with a max assist of 2 EVERY TIME. And we have more and more really ill patients in Rehab, so our accuity is higher and higher. Floating us out, or even out aides, severly compromises our ability to provide quality rehab care. It seems to me they (the suits) are planning to not fill positions as they become vacant, and float people all over to cover them - we don't have enough as it is!

    Savvy

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