What is the first thing you do when you put a fall-risk pt in the bed? - page 3

by Tyris 7,253 Views | 46 Comments

As nurse what is the first thing you do when you put a pt in the bed that is a fall risk... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from K+MgSO4
    you do your own homework!

    PS herring_RN you need a Dr order for a sitter - I dont as it comes out of the nursing budget.

    Shove the bed againt a wall.................reduced area to fall by 50% bet you won't find that in a text book!
    At my LTC, we were told that we could not put the bed against a wall. Someone said that the wall was considered to be some kind of restraint???? Is this true?
    cindjo717 likes this.
  2. 3
    Quote from herring_RN
    Bed alarms don’t work and won’t reduce patient falls

    http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/01/...ent-falls.html
    We have a ton of patients who hear the alarm and remember they need to get help. I find they at least deter the pt a bit.

    "No day but today"
  3. 1
    Our beds have the alarms built in, and are sensitive to about a 25% weight change. Most of our fall risk patients aren't fast enough to do more that sit at the side of the bed before someone gets in the room because the alarm is wailing. I'd say they work just fine.

    And if the pt is a huge fall risk according to our scoring criteria, we get the low bed with 3 sensitivity settings. Granted, sometimes all the pt has to do is roll over and the alarm goes off, but i'd rather silence false alarms than do all the fall paperwork.
    herring_RN likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from MotherRN
    Just to clarify....I thought side rails up X2 = restraints (or at least I think that's what they taught in nursing school-I'm a recent grad). Not that I don't think it's a good idea, just clarifying that it's kosher
    FOUR (as in all) side rails up are a restraint. Two or three are what's expected depending on the facility. How would two side rails up be a restraint? It's not restraining the patient in the bed, there's ample space for them to get out.
    joanna73 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from MotherRN
    Just to clarify....I thought side rails up X2 = restraints (or at least I think that's what they taught in nursing school-I'm a recent grad). Not that I don't think it's a good idea, just clarifying that it's kosher
    Yes side rails can be considered a restraint. It depends on the policy where you work, and the individual resident. Many of our residents have 2 or 3 rails up for safety, because they move around a lot in bed. If the resident rolls out of bed and splits their head open on the concrete floor because no rails were up, we will have bigger issues. Safety is always your first priority.
  6. 3
    Quote from Tyris
    As nurse what is the first thing you do when you put a pt in the bed that is a fall risk
    I call Housekeeping to get that falls risk bed out of the room and get me a regular bed. I hate beds that are fall risk.
  7. 0
    All our beds have only half length rails at the head of bed. No rails of any kind at the foot of the bed. 2 half rails at the top is considered a mobility aid not a restraint. Older beds with full rail x2 = restraint.
  8. 0
    Roll belt!! and bed alarm
  9. 0
    In our facility when a pt is considered a fall risk they get red non slip socks, three side rails and a bed alarm. There is also a magnet on the door jam at eye level that says FALL RISK
  10. 0
    In reality: Bed alarm and the non skid socks

    In my fantasy realm: Get said patient discharged or put them in a giant bubble.


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