Unsanitary practice? - page 3

I work in a pediatric clinic where patients and staff are routinely exposed to fecal matter and blood. We have expanded, and the "new" exam room has no sink. I've been vocal about the limitations of alcohol-based hand cleaners... Read More

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    Are you not wearing gloves? If you are then they will be contaminated and you can shed them and then sanitize and then go wash. Do you see much C-diff in a peds office? Maybe you could get them to only use that exam room for non diarrhea/diaper cases? Just some ideas. Ideally of course you would have a sink, but you have to deal with reality that is way less than ideal sometimes people!

    Ok, let me have it!

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    Quote from jadelpn
    Hmmmmm and don't some of the surveys that people do ask about "if your health care provider washed their hands"? In any event, what does your infection control nurse think of this? I would ask her/him.......
    Absolutely. I just filled out my Press Ganey survey a week ago since I was recently hospitalized. I definitely remember the washing hands question... and it wasn't asking if the healthcare provider used a waterless cleaner, but if they "washed" their hands. That question kinda stuck with me for that reason.

    The hospital room I was in (med surg floor) had two sinks... one in the bathroom, and one just across from the bed. And the nurses, nurse practitioner, and patient care technicians all washed their hands as soon as they entered the room. Can't say the same for two of the physicians.
    jadelpn and nursel56 like this.
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    Folks, this is a pediatric clinic. I can't say for sure but I don't imagine there's a lot of c.diff going around so I don't think that would be a strong angle for OP to take when making her case for a sink.
    wooh likes this.
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    There is everything in a Peds clinic. I have seen PLENTY of CDiff, RSV, Influenza, Rotavirus, Lice, Scabies, HIV acquired infections, etc. I want a sink no more than 5 feet away, and I sure as hell better not have to open any doors/ walk down any halls to get to one.
    jadelpn, Vespertinas, and nursel56 like this.
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    There are times when the kiddos spew, sneeze, send an arc of pee in the air, etc when a 5 foot dash to the sink seems too far.
    jadelpn likes this.
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    Quote from Aliakey
    Absolutely. I just filled out my Press Ganey survey a week ago since I was recently hospitalized. I definitely remember the washing hands question... and it wasn't asking if the healthcare provider used a waterless cleaner, but if they "washed" their hands. That question kinda stuck with me for that reason.

    The hospital room I was in (med surg floor) had two sinks... one in the bathroom, and one just across from the bed. And the nurses, nurse practitioner, and patient care technicians all washed their hands as soon as they entered the room. Can't say the same for two of the physicians.
    We weren't allowed to wash our hands in patients' sinks on my last med/surg unit.
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    Quote from Orange Tree

    We weren't allowed to wash our hands in patients' sinks on my last med/surg unit.
    Omgg....I've seen enough for now. I need a break...let me define break. A break is a short period of time to rest, refuel and reorganize so you feel reenergized. This is a good new thread topic!


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