The Doctor oncall told me not to call him - page 5

I want to know if anyone can help me handle this situation. I work in a small 3 bed ICU where I am the ONLY nurse. I recently had two critically ill patients. One had been on the floor (I had worked... Read More

  1. by   fab4fan
    I believe it is illegal to tape a conversation on the phone without someone's consent.
  2. by   catrn10
    Thanks for all the wonderful help and suggestions you have given me.Unfortunately, I still have 8 weeks to work out of this hospital. After last night's fiasco, which I don't even want to discuss, I am giving serious consideration to hiring an attorney and getting out of there. An hour and a half drive to a new job is looking very attractive.
  3. by   RNforLongTime
    Originally posted by canoehead
    Call him, no matter what he says, and if your supervisor, or hospital doesn't back you up quit.

    If he won't respond to your concerns call the chief of service, and tell him what is happening. And make sure you write "don't call me" as an order in the chart, so he knows he is not getting away scot free.
    Ditto! There should be a medical chain of command in place at your facility. Follow it. I sure hope you documented EVERYTHING! Cause it's the only thing that'll save you in a court.
  4. by   caliotter3
    I just had to respond to sunnygirl272's comment about being the only nurse in the hosp. I was the only licensed nurse in a small SNF with a subacute floor. We had an upstairs and a downstairs. Loads of fun, when only one CNA showed up for work, she was justifiably late, and everything went to hell for me. I was off shift and charting for more than 3 hrs the next morning. One of my new admit subacutes was trying to die on me, I couldn't get the IV started, my pt w/a central line who had no business being in a SNF to begin with, started to go bad on me. There was one or two falls, therefore neuro checks, etc. I don't even remember the rest. I got to the point where I just wanted to sit down in the middle of the floor and go catatonic. I even managed to try to call the ADON and DON and administrator (also an RN) to please come and help me. Nobody answered their phones. And these a******* had the unmitigated gall to black list me after they got rid of me (as well as the others they got rid of). We had a doozie doctor just like you describe too. He told one of the nurses something to the effect of "you just want to ................to cover your as*** when the state comes around, etc." or words very similar. I loved it when I read the nurses' note where she quoted the MD verbatim with quote marks, in the chart!
  5. by   catrn10
    In case anyone is interested how things turned out for me, here it is. I went through channels as suggested. Before the issue was resolved, I was accused of saying a nurse gave me a bad report, which I never said. I told her so and thought the issue was dropped.(this happened saturday night). The agency calls me this morning and tells me all my shifts at that hospital are cancelled. So now, I'm out of work with a family to feed. I guess I'll travel now. I'm not depressed, just mildly peeved. I am also very relieved not to have to go back. I was scared everynight. I feel awlfully at peace for someone who just lost their job.
  6. by   suetje
    I agree with all the sage advice above. I also review cases for a law firm in Texas...and all I can say si document, document, document. Write down what you are observing, what you tell the doc, and what or what lack of orders he does/ does not give you. When I look for liability, I look to see if the RN called the doc or asked for orders (in the notes.). If no documentation, I can't assume it was done. And fab4fan is right. With no license you will have NO job. So call the Administrator of the hospital, ask your supervisor to and document!!! Even standing orders can't always fix things. I just took care of a pt. that was stable all day and then got tachy to the 140's at the end of my shift. His saturation was falling too. I kept calling the intern, and documentting my call and observations to him. I was sure that pt. was going down the tubes, and I was covering myself! Do it!
  7. by   OzNurse69
    Originally posted by catrn10
    In case anyone is interested how things turned out for me, here it is. I went through channels as suggested. Before the issue was resolved, I was accused of saying a nurse gave me a bad report, which I never said. I told her so and thought the issue was dropped.(this happened saturday night). The agency calls me this morning and tells me all my shifts at that hospital are cancelled. So now, I'm out of work with a family to feed. I guess I'll travel now. I'm not depressed, just mildly peeved. I am also very relieved not to have to go back. I was scared everynight. I feel awlfully at peace for someone who just lost their job.
    Sounds like the fates have intervened & made their decision for you. The hospitals loss, you & your family's gain.....

    Take care, stay strong, & remember we are all here caring for you....if it feels like a relief, it was obviously what you wanted (consciously or subconsciously).
  8. by   catrn10
    I've accepted a position in Macon as a traveler. When I come back, the 90 day period that the hospital I want to work at will have expired ( I work agency there and can't hire on because of that, it's the best hospital around), and I can go to work there in the relief pool, at $5 less an hour, but I don't care. I'll be at a good hospital, first dibs at the shifts and I'll be happy.
  9. by   ChristenLPN
    It never ceases to amaze me how being a good nurse is often in direct opposition to being a "good employee." [/B][/QUOTE]


    Truer words were never spoken! If I had a nickle for every time my focus on patient care was labled by somebody else as "not being a team player" I would be one wealthy woman.

    Silly me, I used to think that patient care and advocating for the patients was EVERYONE's first priority, and anyone who followed this code would be supported by the rest of the "team" and valued as a good nurse.

    I also used to believe in unicorns, fairies, and wizards.
  10. by   K O'Malley
    When I worked in CCU the ER sent us a female pt in her thirties who was having chest pain. The ER doctor felt that it was all emotional and relayed this to the cardiologist on call who never even bothered to see the pt. Well, this woman was obviously one sick cookie and having severe chest pain. Our calls to the cardiologist were of no avail, he just acted annoyed and told us not to call him anymore. Finally the woman went into v-fib and we had to shock her. Had to bother the poor doc against his orders. You bet he got his butt in to see her then. And yes, the pt. had a big, wopping MI.
  11. by   giggly1977
    What happened to the patient?? I am a new graduate, I've been working since August 2002 and this story is quite scary to me. I work on a cardiac unit and we have standing coronary orders for Lidocaine, Atropine, Fluid, etc. What kind of hospital is this that they don't have standing orders on an ICU?? If I were you I would probably find myself a new job. And in regards to the MD, if he doesn't want to be called when he is oncall, then he probably shouldn't be a doctor. Good Luck and I hope the outcome was much better than the story itself. God Bless!!!
  12. by   spot
    Dear CatRN - I am arriving late in this conversation. I am appalled at the doc's actions. However, I am pleased that "the fates intervened" and you are no longer in that situation. I would echo the majority of what has been said already. You will recall from nursing school, "If you didn't write it, you didn't do it." It's called CYA-WBH (with both hands)!!

    Take care and God Bless!!

    P.S.: I live to call a doc in the middle of the night. That's why he/she gets paid the big bucks

    See ya
  13. by   K O'Malley
    Giggly, thank goodness we did have standing orders for Lidocaine, etc which didn't keep this poor woman from going into v-fib. We didn't have any standing orders for pain meds though. The doc had made up his mind without seeing the pt. that it wasn't cardiac. This was a few years ago when women with chest pain often weren't taken seriously. Fortunately she did recover. I hope that doc learned to listen to nurses when they expressed an opinion that a pt was very ill.

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