Should a nurse perform CPR to someone outside of the healthcare setting? - page 4

by jjones1728 11,207 Views | 48 Comments

Should a nurse perform CPR to someone outside of the healthcare setting? Is it safe?... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from xoemmylouox
    I will always try to help. If it was me going down I certainly hope someone would try to save me. CPR is far from perfect, but it sure beats doing nothing until advanced help arrives.
    Unless you ultimately end up in a vegetative state. But, I once had a BF and we discussed this to no end. His final argument, and conviction: I don't care what happens to me physically. If my mind can still function, even if I cannot communicate, but I can think- I don't even care if I am totally paralyzed and in a chair- I want to live. Not so for me.
  2. 0
    I have done rescue breathing for someone who had signal breaths and an adequate pulse, while the other bystander tried to prevent me from doing that ; no chest compressions as of yet outside of a facility.

    Regardless of he situation, I would try my best in the situation any way I can.
  3. 1
    I believe that we all have an obligation to help each other, nurse or no. I would have a big problem with a lay person who knows CPR ignoring someone who needs it. FWIW, my dad has performed CPR out in the field twice( he's a retired firefighter) and both times not only got a pulse back, both people lived. I was always under the impression that CPR wasn't meant to bring someone back, but to buy time until the big guns arrived.

    I would do CPR outside of my workplace.
    carolinapooh likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from SuzieVN
    Unless you ultimately end up in a vegetative state. But, I once had a BF and we discussed this to no end. His final argument, and conviction: I don't care what happens to me physically. If my mind can still function, even if I cannot communicate, but I can think- I don't even care if I am totally paralyzed and in a chair- I want to live. Not so for me.
    I agree with your BF, I would want to live too, if I still had brain function. But,people are different.
  5. 1
    Quote from GadgetRN71
    I agree with your BF, I would want to live too, if I still had brain function. But,people are different.
    Take me 'out', please- no incapacities, whatsoever, thanks. . .
    RunnerRN2b2014 likes this.
  6. 2
    The problem is some people come back with fully functioning lives. You don't know what the outcome will be so hence always start the CPR. I don't want to be on a vent for the rest of my life with no ability to move, think, etc, but I sure as hell want the chance to recover. I have seen patient who have coded more than once and have come back to live normal lives, sure they aren't the norm, but it DOES happen.
    carolinapooh and Sadala like this.
  7. 0
    I might if I believed circumstances supported statistically strong odds of a good outcome. I haven't ever had occasion to thus far. I hope I never do.
  8. 0
    Unless the person was clearly dead (and I've had that happen btw - found someone dead with extensive lividity) - I would do CPR (unless there was a DNR).

    And if I had a loved one who was not attended to by a bystander with knowledge then God help that person if there was any question that there might have been a save.

    Read this and then explain to me how you could just stand there.

    Cardiac survival rate in Seattle rises again
  9. 3
    I like what the latest ACLS guidelines say. I got so tickled I went into a crazy laughing fit while I was studying for the exam. This is from the 2010 manual page 90, if anyone cares: "The resuscitation team must make a conscientious and competent effort to give patients "a trial of CPR and ACLS," provided the patient had not expressed a decision to forego resuscitative efforts and the victim is not obviously dead (eg, rigor mortis, decomposition, hemisection, decapitation)."

    Okay, so... running with those guidelines, anyone but a decapitated, cut in half person who's obviously decomposing is pretty much fair game for CPR in the field. I really enjoyed how they defined obviously dead... maybe I just have a really morbid sense of humor. I think these guidelines are reasonable and I would absolutely give someone in the field a chance... as long as they weren't decapitated! Can you even imagine some idiot trying to perform CPR on a decapitated person?
  10. 0
    I am always curious about what to do if you have your children with you, because I heard that once you start CPR you are required by law to stay and continue until the EMT arrives or other relief? Is it a long enough time frame to worry about leaving your 2 year old by your side and hoping he will stay, or does help arrive fast? I have always been curious. I am sure if I needed to perform it somewhere such as a grocery store or restaurant I would, but I obviously would not consider stopping at an accident scene to help if my child was with me.


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