Reporting Medication Errors Supports Quality Improvement

  1. From PSNA.org:

    Reporting Medication Errors Supports Quality Improvement
    http://www.psna.org/Practice/reporterr.htm

    The USP Medication Errors Reporting Program operated in conjunction with ISMP provides health professionals who encounter actual or potential medication errors the opportunity to report confidentially to USP. These reports contribute to improved patient safety and to educational services aimed at preventing future errors. By sharing your experience, you help your colleagues gain an understanding of why medication errors occur and how to prevent them. To reach a USP health care professional who will take your report and respond to your concerns, call 1-800-233-7767 (1-800-23-ERROR).

    Report forms are available in hard copy or on diskette free of charge. Call 1-800-487-7776 (1-800-USP-PRN) to place your order.

    National Coordinating Council For Medication Error
    Reporting Launches Web Site

    Visit the new site at www.nccmerp.org.

    This site provides information about the Council as well as information for the public about medication errors.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   FullMoonMadness
    I have had to do 2 incident reports this week on med errors. One was a heparin drip that the preceding nurse had calculated wrong.>We are suppose to have the drip rates confirmed by another nurse so I don't know what happened, but the pt was holding for a heart cath based on his ptt and she increased to 3200 units!!!!Needless to say he was way over 100. The other was a transcription error involving Coumadin. Both of these are scary med errors, and both times, the unit was "creatively staffed".
  4. by   oramar
    We have this new way of reporting med errors where I work. So far I have not had to use it. There are no incident reports, you just call this number and explain what happened. At least that is what I have been told. There are not supposed to be any incriminations. No one has said anything about it but I am sure you would take steps to minimize effects on patient safety if there were any. That is of course no different than before.
  5. by   gwenith
    I am glad to hear of this as this might be the way to (FINALLY!!) get better labelling on some meds. The ampoules in particular can be difficult to read easily especially at night under low lighting conditions. Individual complaints to companies will not cut it and struggling to read something in a rush in the dark is an error waiting to happen.
  6. by   Vsummer1
    Originally posted by gwenith
    I am glad to hear of this as this might be the way to (FINALLY!!) get better labelling on some meds. The ampoules in particular can be difficult to read easily especially at night under low lighting conditions. Individual complaints to companies will not cut it and struggling to read something in a rush in the dark is an error waiting to happen.
    BRAVO!!!! Although I must add that the rooms with outdoor light are nowhere near our med rooms. Day or night, you are still in that little corner hole-in-the-wall they shoved the pyxis (sp) into. And our pharmacy ain't perfect.....
  7. by   NRSKarenRN
    Check out the ISMP Medication Safety Alert for Nurses---Premier Issue. Free Subscription this year.
    http://www.ismp.org/NursingArticles/...eERR200304.pdf

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