Nurse Employment - page 2

In the State of Texas, despite a current very serious nursing shortage, approximately 15%-20% of the individuals who hold R.N. licensure are unemployed. This statistic comes from the statistical... Read More

  1. by   oramar
    Originally posted by Nurseprotect:
    Originally posted by Volantus14:
    In the State of Texas, despite a current very serious nursing shortage, approximately 15%-20% of the individuals who hold R.N. licensure are unemployed. This statistic comes from the statistical information provided at the web site for The Texas Board of Nurse Examiners. They are not employed in any capactity. This unemployment rate of R..N.'s does not include R.N.'s who hold employment in fields other than in nursing and/or who hold employment as part time R.N.'s. This seems to me to be a very startling and disturbing employment statistic to me. What could be causing the same, especially in the light of a very serious nursing shortage in Texas? I don't want to speculate on the because it appears to me to imply some very serious problems that nurses have with regard to employment issues in Texas and, probably, nationally.

    July 16, 2000
    I have worked in several states. TEXAS IS WITHOUT QUESTION THE ABSOLUTE WORST STATE IN WHICH I HAVE WORKED WHEN IT COMES TO NURSING. I am leaving this state in the morning. Last week was the last straw during one of the most dangerous shifts of my career in Houston Texas. The Texas Nurses Association has basically been "bought and paid for" by Administrator type nurses. If you insist on safe staffing, safe patient care environments, adequate pay, etc. as a nurse in Texas you WILL be terminated-end of story. If you continue working in the unsafe environment, become involved in an error, and get reported, you will not have any backup from the very facility who placed you into the situation leading to the error. You could go to another facility but they are fairly consistently poor. Health care is going downhill throughout the US but Texas deserves an award for exceptionally poor quality. Nurses are still dealt with through intimidation and threats by managers. The staffing in many Hospitals is absolutely criminal. The average norm. for ICU staffing in Texas has become 3 patients per nurse-and the nurses just accept it! Like I said, yes it really is that bad in Texas and I am getting the hell out. If anybody would like clarification on anything I have stated I would be happy to respond. I have learned not to make statements that I am not willing to substantiate.

    Dear Steve, where are you going? Did you do research and find a place where things are better. If you have let the rest of us in on it. Thanks.
  2. by   Mijourney
    Hi,
    Steve, I'm curious about where you moved to as oramar is. Did you move to another right to work state? Or, if you were still planning to stay in nursing, did you decide to move to a state where the nursing association has a union or is leaning towards unionization? Best wishes.
  3. by   nanjam
    Just curious, how are the conditions in Arizona?
  4. by   normarae
    Originally posted by Volantus14:
    I, recently, talked to an official of a State of Texas agency. This person told me that his agency had recently referred 9 R.N.'s to a local hospital for employment at the hospital's request. None of these nurses were hired. The State of Texas is a "right to work" state. That means that a nurse can be terminated for just about any reason. The above means to me that many nurses who are competent,who refuse to be negligent in their care of patients, and who insist on reasoable working conditions and reasonable job security may have difficulty finding nursing employment. The same will drive competent caring nurses out of nursing.



    ------------------
  5. by   normarae
    Originally posted by Volantus14:
    I, recently, talked to an official of a State of Texas agency. This person told me that his agency had recently referred 9 R.N.'s to a local hospital for employment at the hospital's request. None of these nurses were hired. The State of Texas is a "right to work" state. That means that a nurse can be terminated for just about any reason. The above means to me that many nurses who are competent,who refuse to be negligent in their care of patients, and who insist on reasoable working conditions and reasonable job security may have difficulty finding nursing employment. The same will drive competent caring nurses out of nursing.

    welcome to Florida and its RTW problem with nurses being gainfully employed. I am now working for an agency and after 5 days at one well known hospital at which my work was praised---I had to refuse an assignment which would have compromised patient safety/care and my license according to the nurse practice act and clinical knowledge. After getting another RN for 30 patients on tele, I proceeded with the assignment and held safety to a max with setting priorities, and found out later someone called the asst VP to come in and help (unknown to me) and the result is - my agency was informed they did not want my services anymore. The VP said she was just in to visit and was in her street clothes and decided to help when she saw our numbers, help check orders, (agency people do not have computer access to check and sign off orders-I had been working with the secretary for my pts by looking at the data she brought up and checking with the order so I could sign off. Inconvenient, but working -or so I thought. I had been told by their LPN when the assignment was made for me to team lead 30 pts and wait for another RN - she said do not take report because they might not be able to get anyone in and you will be stuck. I heard she was counseled for making this suggestion and of course I am receiving the brunt of this problem and am having trouble making a living. Many nurses are in this situation in central florida and the general idea is to insure yourself heavily, keep your mouth shut about safety and patient issues and attempt to do the best you can or you will be without employment. I realize this issue is lengthy but it is so common in nursing today. What can one nurse do??? If you try to tell the public - it is usually taken as "she protests too much"theory. The bottom line is - nurses will stab you in the back to protect their job - while telling you they are working for an organization that is advertising a positive image and promoting unsafe conditions by threats of termination. Been there once too often.

    ------------------
  6. by   Lulu_camel
    Oramar, what are the best states you've worked in?
  7. by   oramar
    Originally posted by Lulu_camel:
    Oramar, what are the best states you've worked in?
    Oops, sorry if I gave the impression I have worked in a lot of different states. I have worked at many different hospitals but they were all in Pa.



    ------------------
  8. by   traumaRUs
    Just to add my two cents worth. In central IL, in the ER, sometimes staffing is at dangerous levels also. Our assistant unit manager has come in several times to help with pt care. Its a drag, though to work 16 hours and not be able to give your pts away because there isn't enough staff. Health care is getting very scary!!
  9. by   maikranz
    Originally posted by oramar:
    Originally posted by Nurseprotect:
    Originally posted by Volantus14:
    In the State of Texas, despite a current very serious nursing shortage, approximately 15%-20% of the individuals who hold R.N. licensure are unemployed. This statistic comes from the statistical information provided at the web site for The Texas Board of Nurse Examiners. They are not employed in any capactity. This unemployment rate of R..N.'s does not include R.N.'s who hold employment in fields other than in nursing and/or who hold employment as part time R.N.'s. This seems to me to be a very startling and disturbing employment statistic to me. What could be causing the same, especially in the light of a very serious nursing shortage in Texas? I don't want to speculate on the because it appears to me to imply some very serious problems that nurses have with regard to employment issues in Texas and, probably, nationally.

    July 16, 2000
    I have worked in several states. TEXAS IS WITHOUT QUESTION THE ABSOLUTE WORST STATE IN WHICH I HAVE WORKED WHEN IT COMES TO NURSING. I am leaving this state in the morning. Last week was the last straw during one of the most dangerous shifts of my career in Houston Texas. The Texas Nurses Association has basically been "bought and paid for" by Administrator type nurses. If you insist on safe staffing, safe patient care environments, adequate pay, etc. as a nurse in Texas you WILL be terminated-end of story. If you continue working in the unsafe environment, become involved in an error, and get reported, you will not have any backup from the very facility who placed you into the situation leading to the error. You could go to another facility but they are fairly consistently poor. Health care is going downhill throughout the US but Texas deserves an award for exceptionally poor quality. Nurses are still dealt with through intimidation and threats by managers. The staffing in many Hospitals is absolutely criminal. The average norm. for ICU staffing in Texas has become 3 patients per nurse-and the nurses just accept it! Like I said, yes it really is that bad in Texas and I am getting the hell out. If anybody would like clarification on anything I have stated I would be happy to respond. I have learned not to make statements that I am not willing to substantiate.

    Dear Steve, where are you going? Did you do research and find a place where things are better. If you have let the rest of us in on it. Thanks.
    Greetings!
    Just to clarify: Texas Board of Nurse Examiners and the Texas Nurses Association are NOT the same entity. I would guess that the Board offers the licensing exam. For what it's worth, in NC, we nurses are allowed to elect our BON members and, except for a public member, they are all nurses. Many other states are not permitted to do this. I guess Texas may be one of those.
    Membership in the nurses association is entirely voluntary.
    Have you heard of whistleblower laws?

    [This message has been edited by maikranz (edited August 13, 2000).]
  10. by   askater
    I work PRN, once a week. Which I totally love. It's working well, I get the flexiblity and time with my family. If I didn't get flexibilty I'd probably would've stayed out of nursing until my kids were in school. I feel fortunate to work contingent.

    I know a few preggo nurses that finally gave birth and quit nursing. And yes, they were only in nursing one year before quitting.
  11. by   AZRN
    I am a pediatric nurse with 13 years experience. I resigned from my school nursing (one nurse, no assistant, 90 nursing office visits/day!) position one year ago to be at home with my youngest child who began kinder today. I taught at a Christian preschool part-time last year and am continuing to teach at my son's school as well this year. I love it. I do not understand (and have NEVER understood) why is is close to impossible to practice nursing and raise a family or just simply have a life away from work! I attended school for a long time to become a nurse (I have a Masters degree), but find the workplace policies (ie stafffing, etc) very frustrating. I refuse to feel guilty for not using my nursing skills to make this world a better place as the workplace is so unhealthy. When I was charge nurse, I called myself a "nurse advocate" as well as patient advocate. You can imagine how well THAT went over. I have worked with some wonderful nurses, but giving of yourself at the workplace means being taking advantage of, no matter how good you work at boundaries. This is why I don't practice nursing at this time. I am not sure if I will go back next year or not. I don't see the situation changing for the better, yet. And I couldn't figure out how to change it except to get out of it. I am blessed to have the opportunity to do something else I enjoy.
  12. by   Barbara Rose
    Hey! Enough of the Texas bashing! We aren't perfect,but then no one is and yet, alot of our nurses won't stand up for themselves or their patients! I have worked in Texas for 20 years! It is all I know, and I am considered by some as a trouble maker, but I take care of my patients, I am still a patient advocate and all my congressman, staterepresentatives, and just about everyone else who gets letters, etc. knows who I am whether I know them or not. I have yet to not be able to get a job just about anywhere I want one. It is because I am a good nurse, and they just have to deal with my "attitude". But let me say, that one voice will not change the system, it only stirs the waters. I need help!!! We all do, ya'll need to write, call, e-mail, wire, etc. your congressman,representatives, state legislators, dept. of health, human services, hcfa, and anyone else who will listen. A form letter is fine, pass them out to your co-workers. If we do not stand up for ourselves, who will? And you know that if we do not educate the public on the differences between health care workers, our education, training, and knowledge, then they won't know. Volunteer to give speeches at lodge meetings, service groups, etc. Let's change health care for the better, not just whine and become part of the problem! By the way, you have to be willing to be known-I have and it does help, but if you are afraid to "do" anything, then nothing will change.
  13. by   saphie
    Hey Barbara Rose, check out the posting in the general nursing discussion called, fabulous idea. We could use someone like you!
    Tara

close