No lift policy

  1. 0 Could some of you please briefly tell me the status of the no lift policies within some of your healthcare facilities where you are employed, regarding patients that are able to support their weight? Bed to wheelchair, wheelchair to toilet, etc.
    Last edit by PaulG on Jan 24, '04
  2. Visit  PaulG profile page

    About PaulG

    Joined Jan '04; Posts: 2.

    52 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  jemb profile page
    0
    Paul, I think you've gotten no replies because the question is not clear. Are you referring to weight limits that nurses are allowed to lift, patients' lifting things after abd surgery, etc, Hoyer lifts, elevators during a fire drill.....?

    I'm sure many of us would be glad to help if the question were more specific.
  4. Visit  Speculating profile page
    0
    Originally posted by PaulG
    Could some of you please briefly tell me the status of the no lift policies within some of your healthcare facilities where you are employed, regarding patients that are able to support their weight? Bed to wheelchair, wheelchair to toilet, etc.

    I've got a question on the subject and believe it's in the general vicinity of what PaulG was asking anyway. Recently, I've been out pounding the pavement looking for work. During my journey I've seen something new in the industry (at least for me) popping up increasingly more and more. What I'm talking about are the new so called no lift facilities. This is a completely new concept for me, and I'm wondering if someone could find the time to explain the policy to me. I don't understand how this could work no lifting in a hospital? I'm all for it 100% if it indeed works. So could anyone please tell me what they know on the subject?
  5. Visit  donmurray profile page
    0
    There are several threads around, search "no lift policy". I know there's one on the UK nurses' forum 'cos I posted to it a while back.
  6. Visit  Mike RGN profile page
    0
    A no lift policy means what it says

    We don't lift at all

    We assist to move if the patient can help by sliding, suporting otherwise we Hoist.

    Lots of patient with education now move themselves
  7. Visit  Hellllllo Nurse profile page
    0
    There is no such thing as a no lift policy in The States. In fact, Bush just eliminated some OSHA standards for health care facilities related to lifting, ergonomics and back injuries.

    If UK nurses don't lift, how do you move the pts?
  8. Visit  nekhismom profile page
    1
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Hellllllo Nurse
    [B]There is no such thing as a no lift policy in The States. In fact, Bush just eliminated some OSHA standards for health care facilities related to lifting, ergonomics and back injuries.

    Could you elaborate on this for me please? When did this happen? Why is it such a big surprise to me?
    MMaeLPN likes this.
  9. Visit  Hellllllo Nurse profile page
    1
    OSHA to drop nursing homes as inspection targets
    Nursing homes may have one less inspection to worry about in the future. The Occupational Safety and Heath Administration (OSHA) plans to remove nursing homes from future targeting efforts, according to a new report from the General Accounting Office (GAO). In a small footnote, the GAO report on OSHA enforcement programs quotes OSHA officials as saying they'll drop nursing homes as a workplace focus because there's no ergonomics standard under which its inspectors can cite hazards. OSHA at one time targeted nursing homes--where workers frequently experience ergonomic-related injuries, such as back injuries from lifting and moving residents--and cited them under its "general duty clause" for unsafe work environments. However, the Bush administration in 2001 overturned an ergonomics standard that would have addressed a series of musculoskeletal hazards and inspectors have since been discouraged from using the clause to cite violations. An OSHA spokesperson could not be reached for comment.



    http://www.commondreams.org/views03/0702-10.htm

    http://www.pww.org/article/articleview/4135/1/182/

    http://www.heartland.org/Article.cfm?artId=672


    http://www.ibew.org/stories/02daily/...20305_OSHA.htm

    http://www.uaw.org/hs/03/02/hs01.cfm

    Here's an article about Bush increasing the amounts of toxins that workers can be exposed to:

    http://www.aflcio.org/yourjobeconomy...ns10222003.cfm
    Valerie Salva likes this.
  10. Visit  gwenith profile page
    0
    WE got ours introduced and enacted by hitting admin in the pocket book. Here is the Queensland nurses Union submission showing how a "no lift" policy can SAVE an institution money. Sell it on that front and you don't have to worry about Bush (so much)

    http://www.qnu.org.au/about_qnu/occu...o_lifting_2000
  11. Visit  Hellllllo Nurse profile page
    0
    I do not think it's possible to sell anything that makes sense to Bush.
  12. Visit  gwenith profile page
    0
    I meant - sell it to your facility/institution.

    The main focus of no -lift is the "slide sheet" /"move tube" this is (would you believe) sail cloth. IT is REALLY slippery cloth that is placed under the patient. You still need to roll the patient but not as far - once rolled you put the slide sheet under them and then you pull the patient into the correct position - we are taught how to do this and minimise the stress on our backs and shoulders. Taking the cloth out again is very easy. We actually have "wardsmen" who turn our patients for us (usually big strapping blokes) but even THEY use the slide sheets. We use hoists - even on vented patients - to get them out of bed and certainly use hoists for bathing etc.
  13. Visit  Hellllllo Nurse profile page
    0
    Our pts arrive to our unit in wheel chairs. We lift them into the dialysis chair, and lift them back again. If they need to use the bathroom, we lift them on and off of the toilet. Pts are never in bed in a dialysis unit. We do not have a hoyer lift.
    When we did have one, pts had to arrive from which ever facility sent them with a hoyer sling already under them. If they do not have a sling available at the other facility, or they would have to come from home with a sling already in place.So, it won't do any good to have a hoyer lift anyway.

    The lifting situation in dialysis is difficult. I always get help to lift, but it's not enough.
  14. Visit  gwenith profile page
    0
    I would look at altering your chairs. Drop down sides and fold flat chairs - there are also things as transfer mats that are like the carosel thingy in the middle of the table at a chinese restruant. There are a lot of inexpensive solutions out there that will save you - the trick is to find what suits you and talk to managment about the advantages for THEM.

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