Needle-stick, i think - page 2

I was wearing clean gloves and I was stuck by a used needle. It was for foley catheter removal, I checked the gloves there was no hole...I check my hand there was no blood. Am I in danger of getting... Read More

  1. Visit  headinsandRN profile page
    0
    Quote from NewlyGradBSN
    We still use the foley cath with the balloon lock. so i needed to remove the water in the balloon before removing the cath.

    Unscrew the needle and put it in sharps (if one is present) before deflating.
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  3. Visit  NewlyGradBSN profile page
    0
    the foley cath here, requires a syringe with a needle because there is a rubber port.
  4. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    1
    Hunh? You just use the leur lock port, place the syringe in it, withdraw the water and voila, the balloon is deflated.

    Where are you sticking this needle?

    Can you tell us the brand name? Is this outside the US? Thanks and good luck.
    tvccrn likes this.
  5. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from NewlyGradBSN
    the foley cath here, requires a syringe with a needle because there is a rubber port.
    The syringe should fit into that port without a needle.
  6. Visit  tainted1972 profile page
    0
    I have never ever used a needle when doing anything with a foley cath.
    the syringe deflates the balloon .. NO NEEDLE
    when getting a urine sample the syringe goes into the rubber port.. again NO NEEDLE..
    So you are just paranoid.. no needle, no needle stick
  7. Visit  NickB profile page
    2
    All of the cackling aside, let's address the real issue here. If you did in fact use a needle to withdrawl the sterile water in the balloon and the needle never came in contact with the patient's bodily fluids, then you should have nothing to worry about even if you did get a stick. If the needle did come in contact with the patient's urine, and you got stuck, you hopefully addressed it already. Just because you didn't see a hole in the glove and you saw no blood on your hand, you can't be sure that the needle didn't puncture the skin. The way I understand it is the system your hospital uses has a sealed port to the tunnel that supplies the sterile water to the balloon which is completely separate from the tunnel that the urine travels through. In which case, you should be all good. Next time, communicate with your collegues or the charge nurse. No one is going to get mad at you for that question.
    resumecpr and minirn like this.
  8. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from NickB
    All of the cackling aside, let's address the real issue here. .
    That was' ridiculous and unnecessary. People were asking her to clarify. That is all. The "real issue" had already been addressed.
  9. Visit  EverNurseRN profile page
    1
    you stuck the needle in the balloon port and stuck yourself? i really don't think the needle would have came into contact with any bodily fluids, just normal saline from the balloon, which has no contact with the patient's urine-2 seperate tubes within the f/c (unless the balloon sprung a leak, in which case you wouldn't have had to d/c the cath in the first place, it would have just slid out on it's own). so if you stuck yourself removing an anchored f/c via the balloon port, it would have been with sterile saline. on a side note, try removing the needle from a syringe and hooking it up to a balloon port on a cath (non anchored of course , just a random extra cath) and experiment with it. it should fit like a glove and allow you to both inflate and deflate the balloon without the needle. follow your hospital guidelines, of course! and i'm sorry you're having to go through a needle stick scare i stuck myself with a clean needle once and it scared me to death..even though i knew it wasn't contaminated, just the thought was scary.
    NewlyGradBSN likes this.
  10. Visit  NewlyGradBSN profile page
    0
    Quote from evernurse
    you stuck the needle in the balloon port and stuck yourself? i really don't think the needle would have came into contact with any bodily fluids, just normal saline from the balloon, which has no contact with the patient's urine-2 seperate tubes within the f/c (unless the balloon sprung a leak, in which case you wouldn't have had to d/c the cath in the first place, it would have just slid out on it's own). so if you stuck yourself removing an anchored f/c via the balloon port, it would have been with sterile saline. on a side note, try removing the needle from a syringe and hooking it up to a balloon port on a cath (non anchored of course , just a random extra cath) and experiment with it. it should fit like a glove and allow you to both inflate and deflate the balloon without the needle. follow your hospital guidelines, of course! and i'm sorry you're having to go through a needle stick scare i stuck myself with a clean needle once and it scared me to death..even though i knew it wasn't contaminated, just the thought was scary.
    my sentiments exactly. it's like i want to get tested but i dont know what should i get tested for. what did you do after that incident?
  11. Visit  janice_c67 profile page
    0
    not likely that you would have gotten any bloodborne diseases from urine (unless the urine was bloody), but any exposure with a needle needs to be reported. If you felt the stick, then you were stuck whether it bled or not.


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