NA giving drug advice - page 2

I think this falls into one of those gray areas, so I appreciate any insight you can give me. I am an NA (nurse's aide) and I work with another NA who also happens to be a GN. (She is employed by... Read More

  1. by   RN2B2005
    As a rule even after I graduate I cannot answer questions on meds, read the directions to a patient, or reccommend a cold medicine based on symptoms.
    Johnny, I think what she meant was that in an outpatient (retail) pharmacy setting, only a licensed pharmacist is permitted to review instructions and recommend medications. It varies from state to state, but in most cases, non-Pharm.D. or R.Ph. personnel can't review ANY aspect of the medication with a patient.

    She is working as an unlicenced or limited-licence pharmacy technician, not as a nurse. When she graduates she probably won't be working in the pharmacy anymore; still, a nursing licence does not make her a pharmacist, and she would probably be acting outside the scope of her licence if she were to perform pharmacist's duties in an outpatient setting.

    As to the NA giving medication advice, yup, that gives me the willies, GN or not.
  2. by   JohnnyGage
    Ahhh... :imbar Yes, it makes sense now.
  3. by   tattooednursie
    Well, Some CNA's think they know so much. I'm a CNA and I have been asked simmaler questions. I refer them to the nurse. I don't know everything, and I don't pretend to *only appies at work, not at home*
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Pls let me clarify what I said. OF COURSE we teach patients about meds they are taking and prescribed to use...what I meant is, unless they are ordered by MD I feel like I cannot advise any way whatsoever about medications in general. I see nurses ALL THE TIME making general medical recommendations to friends/family or even passing out samples from doctor's offices (w/o script), and I feel this is dangerous. That was what I meant but I said it all wrong. Sorry for the miscommunication! I really did step in it, didn't i?
  5. by   JnJTyson
    I've seen it before also. I do private duty CNA/HHA. I go to the homes, and the client says "so and so told me I should take this rather than this." I usually try to stick to this policy of mine....keep me out of trouble, but still provide helpful info..

    I simply said "I am not the one to speak with about medications, we can call the agency together. if you'd rather not do that, I'll find out information about each medication and you can make the choice that way"

    I have a friend that works in a pharmacy...OTC or prescription drugs...he gives me those little pt info sheets....and I give them to the pt.

    I never say which one I think is better...I just say "here's the info about the 2 drugs...why don't you see which you think would be suitable"

    That mostly applys to OTC of course...but when they are interested in asking about switching (one pt was on Wellbutrin...wanted another anti-depressant) I got her the info book on that drug..and said "next time you see the doctor...discuss your options with him"....

    Keeps me on their good side...and my rear-end out of trouble! =0)
  6. by   ceecel.dee
    Definately out of a NA's scope, and since that is how she is employed, it's a no-no.
  7. by   nurse2002
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    Pls let me clarify what I said. OF COURSE we teach patients about meds they are taking and prescribed to use...what I meant is, unless they are ordered by MD I feel like I cannot advise any way whatsoever about medications in general. I see nurses ALL THE TIME making general medical recommendations to friends/family or even passing out samples from doctor's offices (w/o script), and I feel this is dangerous. That was what I meant but I said it all wrong. Sorry for the miscommunication! I really did step in it, didn't i?



    My mom made a medicinal recommendation to me last week, right before she gave me an ativan. She is a wise woman.............
  8. by   g peach
    under no way would i ever ever give a pt. advice! she could lose her lic. over that one!
  9. by   carcha
    hey, my husband had a volunteer try to give him advice on his pre surgical preparation, how bad is that
  10. by   nowplayingEDRN
    Teach a patient about their medications and what they do and the most common side effects to look for and what they should report back immediately for....absitively. As a nurse it is our job to help educate our patients so that they are compliant with tx. Recommend 1 drug over another...I would say something like: Both are good medications but you should talk with your physician and use the one that he recommends to you. (Hey, that's why they have the initials MD after their name and get the big bucks right??? )

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