medication error - page 3

Please please please help everyone.... Okay, I was working on a saturday in dialysis. One of the patient with end stage kidney disease came in set down and I was assessing her. After assessing... Read More

  1. Visit  py2010 profile page
    0
    the vials is 50,000 units/1ml... the patient port read 1.7cc on the venous line and arterial line. Therefore, 50,000units/1mlX 1.7ml= 85,000 units on each port right?

    Yes, this heparin is use to instill into her port after dialysis. Untill when she comes back we need to withdraw it out of the port and then flush with the port with saline before connect her to dialysis.

    while i was distracted by another nurse, i totally forgot to withdraw it.

    I could not sleep because i don't know what to do. I'm a new nurse. I just recently graduated and still on trainning.

    the reason why i'm not sure if i did withdraw the heparin or not is because i feel i miss the first step.. which is drawing the heparin out of the port before instilling the saline..
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  3. Visit  Sun0408 profile page
    0
    You are talking in circles.. First you have to admit the mistake.. You did forget to withdraw the the heparin..

    your words...while i was distracted by another nurse, i totally forgot to withdraw it.

    Talking circles... your words...the reason why i'm not sure if i did withdraw the heparin or not is because i feel i miss the first step.. which is drawing the heparin out of the port before instilling the saline..

    Learn from this.. take your time and always think of your pt and report errors as soon as they are discovered.

    Yes, we have or will make mistakes, its human. But those errors need to be reported for the safety of our pts as well as possibly saving the same mistake from happening again.
  4. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    4
    Can I ask if you are in the US? There is no way any dialysis unit has 50,000unit/ml - that's just not even kept in stock. Way too dangerous.

    The usual concentration of heparin is 5000units/ml or even 1000units/ml.
  5. Visit  RFRN profile page
    0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Can I ask if you are in the US? There is no way any dialysis unit has 50,000unit/ml - that's just not even kept in stock. Way too dangerous.

    The usual concentration of heparin is 5000units/ml or even 1000units/ml.
    We do have 10,000u/ml in our clinic but that's the most concentrated I've seen.
  6. Visit  Good Morning, Gil profile page
    0
    No offense, but the right thing to do would have been to own up to the mistake right away so the patient can possibly be spared any harm that could have resulted rather than just hoping they are okay. I'm sorry this happened to you, but owning up to the mistake right away could have mitigated any problems....you call the MD right away, explain what happened, and they order protamine or maybe nothing. But, now....you're just left wondering if the patient went home and went into DIC or something. I hope everything ended up okay with the patient. The important part with medication errors is to learn why they occurred so they don't happen again....so now you know the importance of what you are doing, and will try your best not to make small talk during this process.
  7. Visit  Sarah010101 profile page
    0
    50,000 units? I dont think I have ever seen this concentration before? Do they even use this dosage?

    Im sorry for youre mistake and the emotional distress you are experiencing at this time... HOWEVER, you are a licensed professional.. and youhave the duty to report any mistake or error.

    I understand you may be scared to report it because you are a new RN... you are afraid of losing your job etc. but THIS IS NOT ABOUT YOU ANYMORE. This is a patient safety issue. The mistake was made yes... but you are a grown adult, be responsible, be a professional.

    and remember, we are all human, we all make mistakes.. and we all hope to learn from them
    Last edit by Sarah010101 on Oct 24, '11 : Reason: added something extra
  8. Visit  Rawenea profile page
    0
    As a previous dialysis nurse, you would definately know if you have drawn off the hep as these 2 syringes should be discarded accordingly. If you are questioning whether you have done it or not then more then likely you didnt widthdraw the 2 lomens. As there have been no adverse affects to the pt I would definately report it either to your preceptor or charge nurse. I would write what happened, was there any adverse effects to the pt. Once you realised the error occurred what you did. How you felt and what you learnt from the experience. Might help to put what you have done to ensure that this event does not happen again. go prepared so that this shows initiative and that you are willing to learn from mistakes.
  9. Visit  py2010 profile page
    0
    thanks to all the replys..

    Today i went to work and the patient did come back for dialysis.

    I also recheck to heparin vial and the label reads 50,000units/10ml in big writting and 5,000units/1ml in smaller writting.

    Today we did monthly lab draw on all of the patients. so the patient did get her lab drawn today.

    What had happen made me more aware when doing the procedure. I have learn from my mistake not to talk and pay attention to what i'm doing.
  10. Visit  renee1975 profile page
    0
    So basically you are NOT going to report your error because the patient is OK? I find that reprehensible. I hope to God that I am never in need of care from a nurse like you. You are a danger to this profession. All I can say is thank God that poor woman is alright.
  11. Visit  py2010 profile page
    0
    Quote from renee1975
    So basically you are NOT going to report your error because the patient is OK? I find that reprehensible. I hope to God that I am never in need of care from a nurse like you. You are a danger to this profession. All I can say is thank God that poor woman is alright.

    actually, I did reported yesterday when i went back to work. I learn from my mistake. I'm a human being also and I have feelings. I'm a newly graduate and just didn't know what step should I take. I'm sure some of the new graduate out there made mistake. Even Nurses who have many years of experience still make mistakes.
  12. Visit  RhinoRocketRN profile page
    0
    Good job. Now you know to triple check and take care when you are using medications
  13. Visit  kaydensmom01 profile page
    0
    WOW that is disturbing!!

    "actually, I did reported yesterday when i went back to work. I learn from my mistake. I'm a human being also and I have feelings. I'm a newly graduate and just didn't know what step should I take. I'm sure some of the new graduate out there made mistake. Even Nurses who have many years of experience still make mistakes."

    Wow everyone does make mistakes, but the OP knew about the mistake and didn't report it and thought about quitting instead of having to take responsibility. What kind of nurse would rather possibly kill something so they will not "get in trouble" ? I can not believe that as soon as someone sees that they made a mistake like that, not knowing what the reaction will be, can just keep quiet about it. Instead you come on allnurses saying "I hope the patient is okay". This is far beyond a mistake. I would much rather have a nurse that makes a mistake and admits it rather than trying to cover it up and hope everything turns out okay. I don't see how someone like this can be called a nurse anyways.
  14. Visit  PsychNurseWannaBe profile page
    1
    A little off topic, but I remember when I was giving insulin for someone. I gave it to him and chatted a bit and came out to my cart and saw Humalog sitting on my cart. I was like OMG what did I just do because the order was for 40 units of Lantus (kinda a big guy) and I was like did I just give 40 units of Humalog? Needless to say I did contact the Dr and said, I really don't know if I gave Humalog or Lantus. I could have sworn I drew up Lantus. I felt so stupid saying to the doctor, I may or may not have done a med error. What happened was a different nurse "borrowed" the Humalog and didn't put it back and left it on my cart. I was sooooo pi*&$(#. I was crapping bricks doing blood sugar checks like a maniac and calling the doctor like an idiot because of that. I found out 4 hours later she did that. Borrow med = med error, making me feel like crap and stupid in front of a doctor and scared for my patient = I hate you!!
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.


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