Manager DICTATES what to do on your day off - page 2

PPPLLLLEEEAAAASSSSSEEEE help. I am an OT junkie, due to finacial need, husband let go at work, now single income of family of 5 and drowning in bills I am required to do 3 twelve hour shifts... Read More

  1. by   JillRene
    That is exactly why I refuse to go on staff at a hospital. That is such Bull@#$*. I do contracts with one agency and perdiem with another. I've been a nurse for 5 years, and make more than Nurses that have 15 years in. Hospital Administration and managers have been bullying Nurses around forever, I can say this because my Grandmother was a Nurse and so is my Mom. I personally don't see Unions making much of a difference.
    My point being if more went agency, they wouldn't have a choice but to pay higher wages and be more flexible.
  2. by   JillRene
    In response to Gardengal: It is obvious that you are a manager or was at one time. In your example of how you utilize staffing I say kudos to you, you seem fair and reasonable. BUT, a manager like that is one in 100. She shouldn't have to go through all that political crap for something so obviously unfair, that manager doesn't care about her Nurse nor her patients, nor will she ever ever be a good manager. The letter may solve her problem at hand, but with a manager like that it sounds like she'll just find another way to screw her because she made her look bad in front of the big boss.
    If money is truly the big issue, you will be shocked to learn the amount of money out there by doing agency work.
  3. by   Zee_RN
    Yep. My manager has told co-workers the same thing. A few nurses in our ICU will float to the E.D. Sometimes we have been desperate for staff and call them only to find out that they are working in the E.D. that day. My boss is furious when that happens. She wants them to check with her before working on another unit...on a scheduled day off. Thus far we have had one of those nurses turn around and go full time in the E.D. (so we don't have him at all now) and the other one simply does not float to the E.D. anymore--and our E.D. is desperately understaffed. Who won here?
  4. by   Gardengal
    Originally posted by JillRene
    In response to Gardengal: It is obvious that you are a manager or was at one time. In your example of how you utilize staffing I say kudos to you, you seem fair and reasonable. BUT, a manager like that is one in 100. She shouldn't have to go through all that political crap for something so obviously unfair, that manager doesn't care about her Nurse nor her patients, nor will she ever ever be a good manager. The letter may solve her problem at hand, but with a manager like that it sounds like she'll just find another way to screw her because she made her look bad in front of the big boss.
    If money is truly the big issue, you will be shocked to learn the amount of money out there by doing agency work.
    JillRene,

    You're right.I am a manager, but I've also worked agency before, and recognize the problems with some managers and the pitfalls of agency hours being cancelled. The reason i said to talk to the manager again was because sometimes the opposite side of a managers viewpoint is not presented to them in a way that makes them see the overall picture. I personally see the detriment to teamwork and morale if someone works extra in a unit and another is pulled as a result. The ramifications of that make the group miserable and could ultimately lead to further vacant positions and then more short shifts.

    I agree that there are managers who act this way, either by habit, lack of training or the ability to do so without answering to others. I have found that many of my (manager)peers with less training or experience benefit from converstions such as this. Remember...many managers are placed into a management situation because they are clinical leaders in a unit and someone had to do it...if they do OK initially (and sometimes even if they don't) there is little training given because the crisis of the day (no manage for the unit) was resolved. This can lead to a perpetual problem of non recognition of a problem. The reason I said to send a letter to the manager, cc to director above was to highlight the whole issue. Usually a manager will either then listen and at least better explain rationale. If that does not happen then the director would be responsible.

    If punitive action then happened you have in writing the initial issue which would show your professional attempt to resolve an issue. If retribution came from the manager then you would have a backup for complaint. I know many nurses don't want to expose themselves this way, but I have always operated that way because I want the overall problems fixed.

    Sure, it's tough, but if you otherwise like a job these kind of actions can make it better overall. Besides that-Overtime work is ususally easier in your home environment than agency elsewhere, and the hours are more reliable.

    Nimbex
    This thread was opened several months ago-
    I'm curious to see what happened with you .
  5. by   caroladybelle
    As an onco nurse, there were times that I did extra shifts in the mother-baby unit. For one, the OT was good. And for two, it was a rejuvenating break from onco.

    I left hospital nursing because of a Manager that felt that she "owned" me and could control my personal time. I now make better money, and most certainly have better working conditions as a travelor.
  6. by   cindylouwho
    after 24 years of watching the way managers act at my particular hospital, I've come to the conclusion that you don't have to have any skills at all to be hired.....get this...my manager even reads books on how to improve because she knows she needs so much improvement that anyone is unwilling to give her.....kissin butt is about all it takes where I work to be a manager...however that doesn't make for a happy unit
  7. by   nursemouse
    In addition to sympathizing with Nimbex's situation, I'd like to mention that the manager's policy is not very COST EFFICIENT!!! Think about it: I'm the manager of a unit. I'm going to send my regular-time staff member to another unit, which will pay that person's regular-time hours (and tick off my staff, but that's the original issue), and bring in and pay for an OVERTIME staff member to work my unit? Speaking as an employee in a hospital that throttles pennies til Lincoln gets a migraine, it's not a very smart way to do business...
  8. by   healingtouchRN
    dont' tattoo "door mat" on your forehead! Only YOU can let YOU get taken advantage of. If you burn out then WHO will care for you & your family then????:kiss
  9. by   Zee_RN
    Originally posted by nursemouse
    .... Speaking as an employee in a hospital that throttles pennies til Lincoln gets a migraine, it's not a very smart way to do business...
    I just love your way with words there. "Throttles pennies til Lincoln gets a migraine." What a great expression! Sounds like my place too!
  10. by   KARRN3
    I HAD A VERY SIMILIAR EXPERIENCE, I WORKED FULL TIME ON ONE UNIT AND PICKED UP EXTRA TIME ON ANOTHER UNIT FOR A CHANGE OF PACE. THE MANAGER ON MY FULL TIME UNIT CONTACTED THE MANAGER OF MY PER DIEM UNIT AND THE TWO OF THEM "DECIDED" THAT ANY AND ALL OF MY EXTRA HOURS SHOULD BE WORKED ON MY FULL TIME UNIT. I GOT CALLED IN AND TOLD OF THIS CHANGE OF PLAN, I POINTED OUT TO BOTH OF THEM THAT MY TIME IS JUST THAT,"MY TIME",AND THAT I'LL SPEND IT WHERE I CHOOSE. THEY COULD CANCEL MY HOURS ON THE OTHER UNIT BUT THEN I HAVE THE OPTION TO GO ELSEWHERE WHICH HURTS MY HOSPITAL AS A WHOLE BECAUSE THEN NEITHER UNIT GETS MY HELP. THEY CHOSE TO RETHINK THEIR POSITION. WHEN YOU ARE WORKING FULL TIME
    PLUS YOU MAKE THE CHOICE NOT SOME MANAGER WITH CONTROL ISSUES.
  11. by   RNIAM
    Since the origional post last year has anyone heard what happened? Just curious to find out if the manager saw the other side of this issue.

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