Is legal to replace medication drawn up in a syringe back in the multi-vial Is legal to replace medication drawn up in a syringe back in the multi-vial | allnurses

Is legal to replace medication drawn up in a syringe back in the multi-vial

  1. 0 I had a TB skin test on Monday. I went back on Wednesday to have it read. The student nurse assumed I was coming to have it place. So she had drawn up the vaccine and recapped the syringe. When my name was called I notice she had the syringe in her hand. So I told her I just need it read. She goes to the desk and tell the RN it need to be read. The RN then tell the student to go and put vaccine in the vial. Now I know this is wrong so I ask for manager. The manager tell me it is legal because it is a multi-vial and it is not medicine. I have Lupus, this scared me because of infection. I refuse to go back to the office to get my treatment. Will someone tell me if this practice is ok. I am a nurse with Lupus.
  2. 10 Comments

  3. Visit  xoemmylouox profile page
    0
    Uhhh.. That should have been wasted. We all recently had to meet with our staff education staff. The crap that I learned other staff was doing appalled me. This is just another example. Where is the common sense?
  4. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
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    Risk of bacterial contamination, of being put back into the wrong vial etc.

    Definitely should be wasted.
  5. Visit  bugya90 profile page
    0
    I've never heard of it being put back in the vial. If drawn up but not used, we keep it in the syringe in the fridge for 24 hours, if not used by then it gets discarded.
  6. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Are you sure they were a RN and a RN student? At the office I go to....they are all MA's. I got a TB test planted and there was not a wheal ....when I said something the I was a wheal isn't necessary for a proper administration of the test...when I complained to the office manager who was the RN I got an apology.....I'm not going there anymore either.

    NO..you may NOT put it back in the vial
    Last edit by Esme12 on Mar 24, '13
  7. Visit  mdavisRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Esme12
    Are you sure they were a RN and a RN student? At the office I go to....they are all MA's. I got a TB test planted and there was not a wheal ....when I said something the I was a wheal isn't necessary for a proper administration of the test...when I complained to the office manager who was the RN I got an apology.....I'm not going there anymore either.

    NO..you may NOT put it back in the vial
    Yes, I am sure. I read the name badges. She had nerve to call security on me. I have reported it to Alabama Board of Nursing, I have call CDC and OSHA. I'm sure if she did it once she have done it many times and who know what else she has done.
  8. Visit  chrisrn24 profile page
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    It's like 1 ml why not just waste?
  9. Visit  SleeepyRN profile page
    0
    Quote from bugya90
    I've never heard of it being put back in the vial. If drawn up but not used, we keep it in the syringe in the fridge for 24 hours, if not used by then it gets discarded.
    I'm a new grad, still constantly learning. So this question is purely for my learning purposes, not meant to question the practice of your facility. You stated that your work place places unused filled syringes in the fridge for 1 day. My question is, is this not considered "pre-filling" which I've been taught is incorrect to do? Also, is the syringe labeled with the med/dose? For example meds can contain different parts per unit. The syringe only shows ml, not specific unit (mg...) Can you help shed some light on this?
  10. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    2
    Quote from bugya90
    I've never heard of it being put back in the vial. If drawn up but not used, we keep it in the syringe in the fridge for 24 hours, if not used by then it gets discarded.

    Would you give an injection, knowing that not only did another nurse draw up a med, that you didn't witness, but also from a syringe that had been left in laying around, overnight? Was it labeled, and stored, in a way that it couldn't be adulterated? What is the policy in that place? Anway, putting medication into a container is part of dispensing- and she's not a pharmacist, so aside from contamination, it's quite the scope of practice violation. Amazing that a registered nurse made that decision. I hope she never comes at MY vein with an IV....
    Esme12 and SleeepyRN like this.
  11. Visit  bugya90 profile page
    1
    The syringe is labeled with name dose date time and initials of who draw it. We close at 5 so normally at 1645 all unused syringes are discarded regardless if its been 24 hours or 1 hour since drawn. We only draw up when ordered by provider so we only have to do this if a patient refuses last minute. This very seldom happens.
    in regards to "pre drawing medication" I had to pre draw all of our flu vaccines every morning this year because our MAs cannot draw them up per policy but can administer them (I don't know who came up with that one considering the draw and give vaccines every day). Every state nurse practice act has different laws so what us perfectly fine here could be illegal in New York. Each state and facility has their own rules.
    Esme12 likes this.
  12. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from mdavisRN
    Yes, I am sure. I read the name badges. She had nerve to call security on me. I have reported it to Alabama Board of Nursing, I have call CDC and OSHA. I'm sure if she did it once she have done it many times and who know what else she has done.
    Called security on you? Why? The CDC and OSHA.....while the CDC might be interested, especially in leiu of the compounding deaths. I don't think OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance) will care.

    I would think the local board of health would be more interested.

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