Is English required to be an RN? - page 6

I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from... Read More

  1. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from CCU NRS
    so when Asians come to the US and they start all thier sentences with, you such as you take medicine, or you want drink or you go back to bed does this mean they are not intelligent?
    ccu.....nedthered gave credit to those that learned esl, so he is referring to american native-born.
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    I am back at the end here for one reason. I must say I am sorry to Tweety. I was a bit rude and he didn't really deserve what I said. I exchanged emails with him, hoping we see more eye to eye. He really is a professional even if we do not agree. Tweety, I am sorry.

    William Chapman RN NYSDOCS

    Dang, you sure know how to ruin a good flame war. Oh well, this is a moderated board anyway.

    Apology accepted. Thanks for making it public. It takes maturity and class to apologize like that. I apologize as well for my part.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jul 14, '04 : Reason: corrected for tyops and grammatical errors, forgive me please if there are more. LOL
  3. by   Celia M
    I find that when I am having brilliant ideas flowing at a great speed that my fingers cannot keep up with my brain and therefore errors occur. This is an informal method of communication and let's keep it that way. Reserve correct spelling and perfect grammar for formal communication such as charting. We should also remember that this is an international board and even if English is the primary language for many of the countries represented here there are differences in what is acceptable grammar and spelling. Eg: " I sat at the centre table labouring over colouring a picture for my Mummy with oedematous hands" is perfectly spelt in the Queens english!!!
  4. by   Ned the Red
    All I'm trying to say is that there are many things that make a good (or bad) first impression. I'm not the most "snappy" dresser, for instance, and sometimes show up for work a bit on the wrinkled side. I know that this works against me when meeting people for the first time. It doesn't mean that I don't know what I'm doing but it can still hurt me. Good grammar skills are much the same. They don't mean the person is unqualified (unless they happen to be an English teacher) but they can surely color that first impression.

    I'm old enough to remember the uproar when Winston aired their commercial "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should" and people said it should have been "Winston tastes good AS a cigarette should." Everyone has relaxed a lot since then. But (again) like it or not, if you tell someone you "I ain't gonna" or you write "There cars was broke" you may create an impression you don't want and that is difficult to change.
  5. by   husker-nurse
    "palpitate" for "palpate"; "Altimer's" for "Alzheimer's"; I hear these daily by medical professionals and have given up on correcting the speaker. I know what he or she means, and I guess that works. I doubt that many of us are linquists; my suggestion is to make your charting as clear and accurate as possible so that you never have to explain it in a courtroom!
  6. by   DavidFR
    Have any of those who criticize the English of foreigners ever tried working in a foreign country?
    Working in a language that is not your own is scary. A heavy accent or incorrect grammar doesn't automatically mean that the person doesn't understand what's going on around them.
    I work in France with what I feel is a good functional level of French, but there are days when I'm tired or stressed when to speak French is more difficult than on other days and I might search for certain words. My French colleagues are nothing but helpful.
    You have foreign personnel because you can't recruit enough of your own, be grateful for them. And please, a little more tolerance.
  7. by   husker-nurse
    Dear David, I was referring to 100% bonafide Americans! No, I would not want to try to work in a foreign country and learn the language; my grammar would probably cause way too much confusion!
  8. by   DavidFR
    Quote from husker-nurse
    Dear David, I was referring to 100% bonafide Americans! No, I would not want to try to work in a foreign country and learn the language; my grammar would probably cause way too much confusion!
    I am sure you were, but my post is directed at those who have openly criticized foreign doctors for their level of English.
  9. by   husker-nurse
    At the hosptal where I work Med-Nephro, every Nephro Dr. in a particular group is foreign-born, Yes, I have a hard time understanding their English. The orders take skill to decipher. I would not trade them for the world, for the most part, their bedside manner is wonderful and they are amazing with their collective knowledge!
    Last edit by husker-nurse on Jul 16, '04
  10. by   Energizer Bunny
    Oh Dear God here we go again. GET OVER IT! It's a bulletin board....a relaxed, comfortable area for all of us to go and not be crucified for petty little things such as grammar and spelling.
  11. by   BORI-BSNRN
    Quote from DavidFR
    Have any of those who criticize the English of foreigners ever tried working in a foreign country?
    Working in a language that is not your own is scary. A heavy accent or incorrect grammar doesn't automatically mean that the person doesn't understand what's going on around them.
    I work in France with what I feel is a good functional level of French, but there are days when I'm tired or stressed when to speak French is more difficult than on other days and I might search for certain words. My French colleagues are nothing but helpful.
    You have foreign personnel because you can't recruit enough of your own, be grateful for them. And please, a little more tolerance.
    DAVID, I TOTALLY AGREED WITH YOU!!

    HAHAHAHAHAHA




    You have foreign personnel because you can't recruit enough of your own, be grateful for them. And please, a little more tolerance

    Specially for this......I think that if you are working with deficient english person, just help her or him. I've been hearing our President(U.S.A.) speaking spanish and I feel very proud of him! and isn't a good spanish...I mean i do understand that to be an RN professional we have to speak and written a good english, but i think that anyone out there isn't PERFECT!!

    God bless you all! I enjoy this site it is my favorite!
    Last edit by BORI-BSNRN on Jul 19, '04
  12. by   subee
    Quote from angel337
    excuse me if i am wrong, but i thought this board was informal. i wasn't aware that we were required to write text book essays when posting a topic. i agree that how you communicate on paper (especially charting) leaves an impression, but people don't post on this board just to worry about being criticized if what they type isn't perfect. it takes away from the atmosphere that allnurses has provided, which is an environment that people can feel comfortable venting/discussing things they normally couldn't at work. just my 5 cents.
    I'm embarrassed by the serious lack of language skills I see on this website. It appears that many of us practice nursing on the trade level as opposed to the other end of the professional continuum. When we don't have other cues, the language that you enter is even more important than ever. Is is so difficult to spell the plural of patient as patients (as opposed to patient's) I saw on another thread today. If you're too lazy to express yourself clearly then I wonder what other areas of life you express with such laxness.
  13. by   zicovico
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from nursing school. Did we leave it in the classroom, or is it that it was never really learned? I see from the charts I read at work that the case is the same in actual practice. I see so much chatroomease that it makes me sick to read some of the postings in here. Are we professionals that want to sound the part or simply chatroom fools? I for one at least try to sound and act professional. As RNs we have a reputation to be knowledgable and professional. Where are you?
    I think you are somewhat being judgmental. It is completely wrong and incomprehensible to judge someone's ability to perform based on his or her poor English and grammar. There is a clear distinction between practical and theory. Let's get that straight. The RNs who may not have all the grammar in the world may be the very best when it comes to the practical applications of medical concepts and principles. I already sense some sentiments in a person of your nature. If I were an LPN or CNA, I wouldn't work for you.

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