Is English required to be an RN? - page 5

I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from... Read More

  1. by   hypnotic_nurse
    I was an editor at one point in my life, so I see every little thing. However, I never correct ANYONE (well, my kids excepted) unless I'm asked to do so. I find I am very popular when papers or grants are due, though.

    Poor grammar and spelling in charts really makes us nurses look incompetent, especially when MDs who speak English as a second language get it right more often than some of us do.

    Chat rooms and BBs are quite another thing -- those are MEANT to be informal -- the one thing that bothers me here on the board is the poster who always misspells "pregnant".
  2. by   husker-nurse
    and now I really AM ROFLMBO!!!! ( Rolling On Floor, Laughing My Behind Off)
    Last edit by husker-nurse on Jul 13, '04 : Reason: possible misunderstanding
  3. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from hypnotic_nurse

    -- the one thing that bothers me here on the board is the poster who always misspells "pregnant".
    i had a masters-level teacher write me a note regarding my daughter, and wrote to me and i quote, "mrs. earle now i would like to ax you a question."

    hey, AX me anything you want.
  4. by   Ned the Red
    At an open house at my daughter's school one night, one of the teachers kept asking "Is there any more questions?"

    At least she wasn't an English teacher!
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    I was taught to use abbreviations and incomplete sentences in nurses notes to save soace.
    Thus:
    "A/O X4, PERLA, speech clear, no SOB, rales@bases, moves all extremities, handgrasp equal, skin warm & dry, IV D51/2 NS 20meq KCl @ 75cc/hr Lt hand no redness or swelling. [You get the picture]
    Writing without a subject and verb is not practice for good writing.

    BUT, I aint a gonna be done havin' no double negatives. Hear?
  6. by   hypnotic_nurse
    Quote from spacenurse
    I was taught to use abbreviations and incomplete sentences in nurses notes to save soace.
    Thus:
    "A/O X4, PERLA, speech clear, no SOB, rales@bases, moves all extremities, handgrasp equal, skin warm & dry, IV D51/2 NS 20meq KCl @ 75cc/hr Lt hand no redness or swelling. [You get the picture]
    Writing without a subject and verb is not practice for good writing.

    BUT, I aint a gonna be done havin' no double negatives. Hear?
    Come write notes at my institution whenever you want!!!!
  7. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from earle58
    i had a masters-level teacher write me a note regarding my daughter, and wrote to me and i quote, "mrs. earle now i would like to ax you a question."

    hey, AX me anything you want.
    LMAO! I've heard people pronounce "ask" as ax, but I've never seen anyone write it that way. Too funny!
  8. by   CCU NRS
    ouyay aymay ebay ishingway atthay ouyay evernay artedsay isthay ubjectsay eforebay tiay siay llaay veroay

    nope but you must be fluent in pig latin
  9. by   CCU NRS
    also this reminds me of a joke I heard

    The english professor is telling his students that English is the only language in the world in which there are no two positive words when used together that make a negative statement

    a student says "yeah right"
  10. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    I Think That Jailhouse Probably Meant That Everyday Speech Is Becoming Uncouth....i Think There Should Be A Different Level Of Acceptance Depending On Where You Are.....ain't Ain't Acceptable Anywhere But Regional Differances Give Us Color...e Room Anything Goes Partly Because Of Differant Levels Of Typing Proficiency And Lack Of Proofreading Before Sending
    Love the caps on every word BTW
  11. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from Ned the Red
    I almost hate to get involved in this but as an ex-English teacher I find I can't help myself. My concern/gripe isn't the occasional typo or the fact that folks "talk" in a forum differently than they would in a formal document. What bothers me is the use of English in such a way as to discredit the user.

    Me and her instead of she and I

    There WAS twenty five patients instead of there WERE...

    For better or for worse these things reflect on your abilities. As someone said earlier it's hard to have confidence in someone as a professional when they don't take the time to get the basics of the language right.

    Having said that, for me it's a different matter with someone who is a non-native speaker. I give them a lot of credit for speaking a second language.

    Ok, let the flaming begin!
    so when Asians come to the US and they start all thier sentences with, you such as you take medicine, or you want drink or you go back to bed does this mean they are not intelligent?
  12. by   Jailhouse RN
    I am back at the end here for one reason. I must say I am sorry to Tweety. I was a bit rude and he didn't really deserve what I said. I exchanged emails with him, hoping we see more eye to eye. He really is a professional even if we do not agree. Tweety, I am sorry.

    William Chapman RN NYSDOCS
  13. by   NewbieNurse2005
    This thread may have been a semi waste of time, but I really enjoy reading it.

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