I was recently terminated

  1. 0
    I was recently terminated from my ECF position. I am a fairly new BSN graduate, with a little over a year of experience. I took this position, in gaining some experience, and eventually applying to the area hospitals. I was assigned to the Alzheimer's/dementia unit, as well as the Medical-surgical unit, and worked the Night-shift.

    One night one of the Resident's of the "Secure Unit" made a friendly knock at the door of the Nurses' station. Usually, the Resident at the door is requesting something to drink or eat, or needs something repaired.

    I had just set my stuff down to begin my shift. When I opened the door, this Resident stated: "I am going home!", and proceeded to physically move herself into me. Without hesitation, I moved the lady back into the "Secure Unit." The incident lasted about 3 seconds, and she was safe again inside the "Secure Unit".

    I was placed on suspension for 2 days awaiting an investigation of the event and my action in which I took. On the third day, and I thought I would have my employment reinstated, I was informed I would be discharged immediately. The administration believed I should have used "redirection" techniques.

    I was shocked and devastated with this decision, and being a new graduate with limited experience, I do not know where I am going to find work. My work history is excellent, except for this one incident. My co-workers were also shocked by this event, and believed my action was permissible. What is going on? Was I wrong with my action I took?
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Unfortunetely, once you physically backed patient out of the doorway by touching patient, it could be considered battery. Also, if the policy is that you don't open the door for a patient (which may be, although practice may be different) you perhaps would have had an issue if the patient decided that they were going to come into the secured area.
    Esme12 likes this.
  5. 0
    Your safety should always come first. If you truely were being physically assault first by the patient and you were protecting yourself then you don't want to work for that kind of place that doesn't have your back Money isn't more important then your safety. Pick yourself up,dust yourself off and keep moving.
  6. 4
    There are so many "gray areas". It's scary. A nurses job seems to be on the line 24/7!
  7. 0
    Yikes! So sorry to hear about your situation. I heard of a psych nurse that got the hell beat out of her by a patient and she tried to restrain him using a method against the facility policy. She got sent to the hospital, black and blue, needed several stitches and even had a brain injury. She still lost her job.
  8. 4
    It is worrisome that the employer acted quickly to terminate and I am concerned that termination is not the end of this matter, suggest you contact a lawyer.
    Gold_SJ, KelRN215, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from diligent-trooper
    I was recently terminated from my ECF position. I am a fairly new BSN graduate, with a little over a year of experience. I took this position, in gaining some experience, and eventually applying to the area hospitals. I was assigned to the Alzheimer's/dementia unit, as well as the Medical-surgical unit, and worked the Night-shift.

    One night one of the Resident's of the "Secure Unit" made a friendly knock at the door of the Nurses' station. Usually, the Resident at the door is requesting something to drink or eat, or needs something repaired.

    I had just set my stuff down to begin my shift. When I opened the door, this Resident stated: "I am going home!", and proceeded to physically move herself into me. Without hesitation, I moved the lady back into the "Secure Unit." The incident lasted about 3 seconds, and she was safe again inside the "Secure Unit".

    I was placed on suspension for 2 days awaiting an investigation of the event and my action in which I took. On the third day, and I thought I would have my employment reinstated, I was informed I would be discharged immediately. The administration believed I should have used "redirection" techniques.

    I was shocked and devastated with this decision, and being a new graduate with limited experience, I do not know where I am going to find work. My work history is excellent, except for this one incident. My co-workers were also shocked by this event, and believed my action was permissible. What is going on? Was I wrong with my action I took?
    Your story reminds one of a scene from the fim "A Nun's Story".

    Sister Luke assigned to a "mental hospital's" violent patient ward as a night nurse. During her orientation she was told *not* to open certain patient's secured rooms unless another nurse or helper was present. One night alone one of the most violent patients quietly and meekly asks SL for something. Sister fetches it and once she unlocks and opens the door the patient promptly begins to give her a major beat down. Escaping (just) with her life SL manages to press the panic button that summons help. Her supervisor in both nursing and convent shows up as well and asks what happened and all Sister Luke can say is "pride, pride, once again my pride".

    Long story short every facility has rules and one is espected to follow them. Yes there are times when nursing staff will "bend" things alittle, but you have to know what the lay of the land is management wise about such things.

    Personally I would have gotten my game face on then clamly but firmly redirected the patient back where she belonged. If that didn't work take voice and tone up a notch (but still being nice), restate my position. Should that not have worked summon management and or an experienced RN for advice and or back up.

    Your'e a new grad and this was your frist gig so while it is natural for you to feel hurt, if this is the only "error" you make in a long nursing career count yourself lucky! *LOL*

    Pick yourself up, dust off your pride and start looking for a new job. New grads make mistakes knowingly or not, it's part of the landscape. Thing to do is learn from them and move on.

    Best of luck,

    DGTG
    Esme12 likes this.
  10. 0
    An element of the story is missing. If this is an Alzheimer/Dementia patient, wouldn't you all have a set procedure for when he/she becomes irritable?
    I wouldn't think you backing her away, granted this is an assistance to move her back into the "secure unit" would be grounds for termination. Were there any allegations of abuse prior to or occurring? Who would have made these allegations? I worked with Alzheimer/Dementia patients before, and know they're not the most credible sources. There has to be more than, you are fired for removing the patient from the nursing station/break room.
  11. 0
    If you were terminated on allegations of abuse, I would definitely seek an attorney. This could likely effect your nursing license forever.
    Also, ask for a meeting with your former DON to discuss the incident ,and ask for official documentation on the findings. You want to cover all of your bases and then some. You definitely need to know what the discovery was after compliance review.
  12. 0
    I would definitely seek the advice of an attorney. Many employers will make an allegation against your license with the Board and you would not be informed of this. Take steps now to clear your name and find out exactly where you stand. Good luck finding new employment.


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