I have a question reguarding what I will have to deal with tomorrow.

  1. Ok . . . Tomorrow I will have 16 residents on my hall 14 of which are constant call bell ringers! I am under alot of stress at work, at home, at school, hell! even in my sleep. I feel that I will just CRACK tomorrow. All the new admits seem to travle to this hall, so maybe I'll have even more! anyway . . . . I want to think of a nice polite way of saying, "If you even think of ringing that one more time, I'm gonna put it where the sun don't shine?"to the bell ringors or "PUT A STINKIN' SOCK IN IT!" to the yellers and complainors.

    I know those are the phrases that I'll have in my mind, but it wouldnt be too great to say that! What do you do to keep calm when your patients are driving you to hell in a bed pan (lol) what do you keep in the back of your mind to make you feel better, and what do you substitute with those sayings, and how do you get through to them?
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   live4today
    First, let me give you a great big warm hug:

    ((((((((warm hug comin' at cha)))))))))) :kiss

    Second, before you step foot out of your car to enter your place of employment, practice a few deep breathing exercises with your eyes closed and your mind in your favorite place (for me...that would be the ocean).

    Third, as you begin your day with the residents, greet each one with a smile, do for them what needs to be done as you share nothing but positive conversation with them.

    Keep in mind that you are but ONE wonderful person, and 'the residents' are MANY wonderful persons. You can only give as good as you have within you to give. Keep telling yourself that all through the day as you go about your job.

    Remember too that the sun rose with the moon expected to follow in a few short hours at the end of every day, so as your shift started, so it will end.

    DO be the best you that you can be...nothing else is worth stressing over. As long as you know that you are giving your absolute best to your residents and people you are working with/for...clock in with a smile in your heart and on your face, and clock out with a smile in your heart and on your face.

    At the end of your shift, as you walk out that door to your car, leave the job behind you by taking a few more deep breaths and blowing them out ever so slowly as you focus on something fun and exciting to do after work. Sing your favorite tunes on your way home, play your favorite CD, think of what you want for Christmas, go to the mall and look at the beautiful holiday decorations, relax, relax, relax.

    Ahhhhhhhhhh....feel better? Have a beautiful and peacefilled day! We can't do anything about what others do, but we can always elect to choose what is best for our state of mind and emotional well-being. Be good to yourself, and let go of that which you have no control over, and watch the undue stress and frustration disappear. :kiss
    Last edit by live4today on Dec 3, '02
  4. by   Sleepyeyes
    Is there no way these folks can put themselves on the bedpan?

    One of the things I do is: if a patient gets on the light more than 3 times in a half-hour for stuff like "pour me some more water from the pitcher right there" (in their reach, already!), I set some limits. I come in the fourth time and I explain that I will be unavailable for the next half-hour, so they need to think of all the things they might need me to get them for the next half-hour.

    Alternatively, handle it with humor. I think of bellringers as "Sisters of the Perpetual Light" and somehow, it gives me enough of a giggle to keep comin' back...
  5. by   Jaaaman
    Don't you have any aides to help you with all the call lights?
  6. by   tattooednursie
    hey, thank you all . . I feel better already! . . . LoL sisters of the perpetual light, I like that. I'll let you know how it goes tonight after I get home.
  7. by   LasVegasRN
    Mandi, what do you do there? Are you a CNA?
  8. by   2banurse
    Cheerfuldoer, that is some wonderful advice and though I am not yet within a clinical setting, I will try to remember your nice post to Mandi.
  9. by   Cubby
    Although I am not a religious person this one phrase from the Bible comes to me at times like those you described.
    '...as you do unto the least of these yet you have done unto me'
    It always puts my residents needs/wants into perspective.
  10. by   tattooednursie
    Hi, Yes I'm a CNA a crazy one lol

    I got through yesterday!!! Thank you all for your help. Those who I were working with were very helpful with answering my call bells . . . hey I used the "sisters of the propetual call light" phrase. They kinda got the hint that I was tired of the ringing as soon as I walk out of their room they still wrank about every 10 minutes though (these 2 particular residents) and the others wrang about every 15 minutes, lol it was still busy but I managed to keep my cool most of the night. thanks again.
  11. by   Tookie
    Good post Renee
    Coping with demands is a lot about metally preparing and letting go afterwards
    Mandi - you will get stronger and manage better - all this is in a sense preparation for the next lot of responsibilites you will be facing as you go futher in your career.
    As we get older we all develop coping mechansisms
    Its great you are asking how to cope and reflecting on your own coping strategies.
    Good Luck
    Tookie
  12. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by FutureRN_Mandi
    Hi, Yes I'm a CNA a crazy one lol

    I got through yesterday!!! Thank you all for your help. Those who I were working with were very helpful with answering my call bells . . . hey I used the "sisters of the propetual call light" phrase. They kinda got the hint that I was tired of the ringing as soon as I walk out of their room they still wrank about every 10 minutes though (these 2 particular residents) and the others wrang about every 15 minutes, lol it was still busy but I managed to keep my cool most of the night. thanks again.
    Maybe the charge nurse can help you discover why these residents are really so needy...If you are getting their basic needs taken care of in a timely manner and checking to make sure that everything is in reach every time you leave the room then something else may be going on.....Depression,pain(these folks don't often recognize and claim their own discomfort) and fear can all play a part in their behaviors...If they are just demanding PITA's then you and the charge nurse can set limits (unless you work in the type of LTC in which the admin does not back you up) Good Luck-this can be a great learning experience for you.....
  13. by   sandyth
    The person who invented the call bell will burn in HE!!
  14. by   lpn3324
    congrats Mandi...you did better than I would have.

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