How does the nursing shortage affect you?

  1. Hello to all who read this. I am a nursing student in a small town in BC, Canada and am researching some of the effects caused by the nursing shortage. I am interested in hearing any stories that anybody has about what they are seeing in regards to how patient care is being affected by the shortage. I have seen some issues in the two years that I have been in nursing, and would love to hear how it is affecting people from other areas. All input would be great. Thanks!
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Nicole Marie
    Hello to all who read this. I am a nursing student in a small town in BC, Canada and am researching some of the effects caused by the nursing shortage. I am interested in hearing any stories that anybody has about what they are seeing in regards to how patient care is being affected by the shortage. I have seen some issues in the two years that I have been in nursing, and would love to hear how it is affecting people from other areas. All input would be great. Thanks!
    Hi Nicole and welcome to the Board!
    In answer to your question, there is no true shortage of nurses, only a shortage of nurses WILLING to work in health care facilities under the conditions that exist in most places.
    I am a nursing instructor. We have many, many more students wanting to get into our ADN program than we have slots available (347 applicants for 42 slots this past year). The reason we cannot expand is a shortage of nursing faculty. However, this also is not a true "shortage," as pay for ADN faculty is the BIG factor. The average nursing instructor in NC community colleges makes $10 grand LESS a year than what she/he can make as a staff nurse in a hospital (and for the Masters-prepared, $20 to $30 grand/year LESS than what she/he can make in private practice.)
    I see hospitals in our area desperate for nurses, with a big emphasis on recruitment. However, RETENTION does not seem to be their priority.
  4. by   Jay Levan
    Sorry, but I must disagree emphatically. I will give you the fact that there are Nurses such as myself, who are completely fed up with Hosp. Adm. who believe as you do that there is no such thing as a nursing shortage. They continue to collude to hold nurse salaries to a minimum while heeping more and more responsibilities on those nurses, that see the issue as "Oh well, we must do our best to do what is necessary to take care of our Hospital's financial woe's, by doing everyone elses jobs as well as our own otherwise we will not have a place to work!" I'm talking janitorial duties, unit secretarial duties, Pharmacist duties, central supply duties, Case management duties, and anyone elses duties that administrators feel we need to do to justify our salaries. Ever ask yourself the question, "How many nurses HAVE to work more than one job just to make ends meet? Sometimes as many as three jobs for single parents with two or more children to raise. What type of parenting can an absentee parent be able to provide. Are you denying statistical information that right now in this country, thirty or mor states are reporting Nursing Shortages some classified as CRITICAL? Ah, now to nursing instructors, are you aware that your ranks will be cut in half within the next five to seven years? There is an old song titled "Rose Colored Glasses" I suggest you find a copy and listen to it, then take off those rose colored glasses and see the reality called "The Nursing Shortage" I have gone through several of these shortages and this one is for REAL. Just One more question, If there is no Nursing Shortage why are Hospitals going back to the "Sign On Bonus Some as high as Thirty Thousand for five year commitment?? :
  5. by   Migration
    I tend to agree with VickyRN. I am from the Caribbean where we are feeling the effects of the nursing shortage in North America. The US can offer what appears to be attractive salaries to our nurses, so they leave. The result is an acute manpower shortage in the hospitals. However this only came about because the working conditions were unsatisfactory.
    The employers do not seem to want market forces of supply and demand influence working conditions for nurses. Because we are the largest group of health care providers, they are not willing to make the necessary investment - the result an outward flow of our skilled labour.
    I am convinced, without having the required statistics, that there are sufficient qualified nurses to meet the staffing needs. However, everywhere, there are many more attractive employment options, therefore the number of available hands is grossly inadequate.

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