Future Shortage in Bedside Nurses - page 9

by westieluv | 22,784 Views | 117 Comments

I have been an RN for 22 years. In recent years, we all know that the trend has been for acute inpatient facilities to try to hire BSN nurses as much as possible. However, another trend that I am seeing, both here on these forums... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    One of my coworkers is a floor nurse with a MSN degree. She has never worked in management, has spent an entire career as a floor nurse, and is honestly not managerial material due to her lack of leadership qualities. However, she is a darned good nurse who can rock it on the floor.

    One of our frequently-posting members (♪♫ in my ♥) is a second career nurse with a MSN degree who works in a bedside position.
    What's her role? Is it a typical bedside position?
  2. 1
    Quote from Aurora77
    What's her role? Is it a typical bedside position?
    If I am not mistaken, he is a bedside nurse in an emergency department or critical care unit.
    lindarn likes this.
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    I am an LVN who is going for her BSN in the near future. All I have ever wanted is to work on the floor! I want to be there, helping people hands on for the rest of my career. Sure I have thought of specialties like pedi oncology for tops, and any critical care area. And sure I have thought about advancing to NP but I would much rather just make a stable living doing what I dream of.

    So I think that the future could be in RN's who were LVNs for awhile that all they wanted to do was be in acute care and know what its like to have a hard days work. There is a BSN program in my city. I have spent A LOT of time with their students in clinicals, and the hospitals we shared were open that they preferred us to them because all they want to do is sit there while we assisted with ADLs and they waited to assist with more complex procedures. One said "I'm not going to RN school to wipe butts" and the ICU nurse said "I am a BSN, RN and I wipe butts, shave, shower, change linens on a daily basis."

    I think its sad that these new RNs everywhere we were thought they were above us, maybe they were but all I can say is, in 1st semester we learned a variety of skills that they on their 3rd year didn't know how to do. In the end of the year they watched us perform these skills as they watched because all they could do was tell us how to do it.
    Red35 likes this.
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    I have my MSN, and I am a bedside nurse. my education cost me 65,000 dollars, but I love my job thus far and certainly don't think it was a waste. I have the option to continue on, but I'm going to give it some years before I do.
  5. 3
    I always wanted to be an ER RN but when there were no openings I gladly took tele. I ended up being miserable in tele because of the STAFF i worked with NOT the patients or the work. THe MD's were annoying but there were always ways around them. But the other nurses are what really killed it. Now that I finally have become comfortable in ER, it's not Heaven, but it's WAY better than floor nursing. BECAUSE OF THE STAFF! I asked a teacher who was studying the personality difference between floor and she confirmed my belief that certain floors attract certain types of nurses, and when your personality is very different from the pack, it can spell HELL for you. I despise floor nursing because my personality is not well suited for the floors. I've worked in several different floors and my attitude (ER RN attitude) ****** off the other nurses, as it does whenever ER nurses and floor nurses talk.

    As far as bedside nursing is concerned it sucks even in critical care because you are expected to do a ridiculous amount of things in a ridiculously short amount of time. Also nursing is one of the most disrespected profession EVER! We get paid, but we get treated like slaves! This is the ONLY profession that I've ever worked where a man (a doctor) will walk right past a 100lb little girl trying to lift a 200 lb object (a person) and not help. or not hold doors, or take your seat. I was pregnant at my job and if an attending was around I WAS EXPECTED to get up and stand while that sat!!!!! if I were outside of a hospital, that would never happen! So gross. But if you have on scrubs you're no longer a woman, you're a work horse. MD's are no longer men, they are little gods who are not to be questioned and do no wrong. LMBO!

    I want to work where I'm needed, respected, wanted and valued. While there are people who need us, bedside nursing does not allow us any of those qualities. I think when you hear of people wanting to become an NP it's because they want to be a bedside RN, but they want job security and respect, along with a little dignity when expressing what's happening with your patient.

    Also some days I would LOVE to be in management, because many times there are no people who are willing to stand up and protect new nurses from workplace violence, etc. I would like to help nurses learn to care for each other as a profession. Many people may want to see that in their workplaces as well and that's why they want to move up. I'm just saying...
    calivianya, prettymica, and anotherone like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    One of my coworkers is a floor nurse with a MSN degree. She has never worked in management, has spent an entire career as a floor nurse, and is honestly not managerial material due to her lack of leadership qualities. However, she is a darned good nurse who can rock it on the floor.

    One of our frequently-posting members (♪♫ in my ♥) is a second career nurse with a MSN degree who works in a bedside position.
    I work with a nurse who has her doctorate... and she still works the floor.
    A very humble and intelligent nurse.
    She is not in management.
    She just enjoys learning and seeing how far she can go.
    I think that's pretty neat.
    LPNnowRN likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from Hygiene Queen
    I work with a nurse who has her doctorate... and she still works the floor.
    A very humble and intelligent nurse.
    She is not in management.
    She just enjoys learning and seeing how far she can go.
    I think that's pretty neat.
    I think that's really neat too.

    Those who are interested in management and administration from the beginning are probably using their education as the means to get there. But not everyone who pursues higher education is interested in that. There are those who go back to school and earn degree after another simply because they like doing that, but perfectly content with bedside job (as long as their knowledge can be applied and utilized, making the education worthwhile.)

    I think that's the greatest thing about nursing. Our profession allows us to take all kinds of different paths while still preserving the identity "nurses." It's too soon to surmise that there will be a shortage just because more nurses are coming into the profession with higher degrees.
  8. 1
    I do wish employers would compensate us for attaining higher degrees. My MIL was a teacher, and she got a raise every time she advanced her education, regardless if the goal was a promotion or move to administration - as is being said, they recognized the value of education for it's own sake. It wasn't a huge amount of money, but to me it was symbolically very important.
    prettymica likes this.
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    If organizations use statistical information such as the percentage of nurses who are degreed-whatever the level of degree BSN and above for advancing their standing in the community-then I feel the nurses who attain that level of education should be compensated by that organization/facility. The Magnet Status is one of the examples of that. If they tout higher education with better patient outcomes then they should compensate. This should continue until the entry into nursing (BSN) becomes a reality-These are all statistics that are out there in community shopping sites for healthcare. Advertising takes money-so should the reality of the monetary burden of staff with advanced nursing levels of education. No matter if these nurses are administrative or bedside.
    prettymica, anotherone, amoLucia, and 1 other like this.
  10. 0
    I worked as an LPN for 6 years and have now been an RN for one. I am going back to school to get my bachelors because in the state I work in and overall as a nation the push is for nurses to have their BSN and you will be more likely to get a job over an ADN if you have it. As of right now I have no desire to become an NP...to much responsibility and liability in my opinion. I like bedside nursing, but then again I work in rural America and the nurse here does it all, OB, ER, and the floor.


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