Forced to stay and work under mandatory evacuation? - page 22

by squatmunkie_RN

33,021 Views | 256 Comments

I live near the gulf where evacuating for hurricanes is a possibility around this time. The hospital where I work places nurses on teams. One team is forced to say, the other forced to come back 24 hrs after the hurricane is... Read More


  1. 0
    [QUOTE=HM-8404
    What I find annoying is when I hire someone I have certain expectations and they start making excuses why they can't meet the agreed upon terms of their employment.[/QUOTE]


    I'm sure, but I would not care if you were annoyed.
    In a major catastrophic event, I could care less if you were annoyed.
    "Sorry, kids, you'll just have to deal with this here tornado alone... I have to go to work because someone will be annoyed."
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    [QUOTE=LaughingRN;6790257]
    Quote from Piglet08

    To me, I find this statement annoying.

    My child's life is worth more than 25 dollars an hour.

    Period.
    That's not fair. You took her statement completely out of context. She was remarking on the people who implied that those who have kids and are willing to go into work in an emergency are not quite up to snuff as parents.
    AnxiousRNtobe likes this.
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    It is completely legal . You signed up for this once you became a RN. You cannot refuse and leave as this is considered "abandoning" a patient. Abandoning in my state / Texas puts you up for license revocation. We as nurses took an oath.

    On second thought, you are not required to stay but some hospitals will try and get you under the abandonment clause.
    Last edit by Unique X on Aug 6, '12
  4. 0
    Quote from Hygiene Queen

    I'm sure, but I would not care if you were annoyed.
    In a major catastrophic event, I could care less if you were annoyed.
    "Sorry, kids, you'll just have to deal with this here tornado alone... I have to go to work because someone will be annoyed."
    Well, as long as you don't mind that someone might be fired...but you already said your kids are worth more than employment so we're back where we all started, being annoyed lol
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    Quote from Hygiene Queen

    I'm sure, but I would not care if you were annoyed.
    In a major catastrophic event, I could care less if you were annoyed.
    "Sorry, kids, you'll just have to deal with this here tornado alone... I have to go to work because someone will be annoyed."
    I suppose you think it is acceptable to accept employment with the knowledge you are not going to fulfill your responsibilities?

    Would that not be the same as a parent in the military refusing to be sent overseas because they have children that need them?

    My suggestion is don't take a job you are not willing to do. Whatever that job is.
  6. 0
    Quote from HM-8404
    I suppose you think it is acceptable to accept employment with the knowledge you are not going to fulfill your responsibilities? Would that not be the same as a parent in the military refusing to be sent overseas because they have children that need them?My suggestion is don't take a job you are not willing to do. Whatever that job is.
    Well I mean, suff happens, let's say I don't have kids but I have a mother in a wheelchair at home; I'd do the best I could to show up and make arrangements for mom, but if I can't then I can't, and if I'm disciplined so be it. It would be rather annoying to hear someone wave their mommy flag constantly and straight up say "forget that noise, I won't be there regardless because I've got kids;" however I'm not sure that's the position of most people here. I'm sure they would try to do their job before using their kids as a shield from responsibility.
  7. 3
    from redhead.nurse98: " i'd do the best i could to show up and make arrangements for mom, but if i can't then i can't"

    that's right. you try, and if you can't, you can't. that's all. and you don't need to go on about how, say, your mother is your life, and means more to you than any job. goes without saying. and your duty to preserve the life of a loved one who can't do it independently is of course one you can't abandon. but you try to do both.
    there's always a chance that plans can fall through, and whatever you set up as your backup plan can fail you. but i was getting the sense that some would not even try, and would not leave the kids. that's a valid choice, but it should be made before you take a job that asks you to leave the kids.
    redhead_NURSE98!, HM-8404, and llg like this.
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    The OP lives in a hurricane area. Many forget that hurricanes do not hit in a matter of a few hours or minutes. You are given days notice, sometimes 3+. If someone can foresee it being a problem and can't get their kids or wheelchair bound mom evacuated with 2-3 days notice they have no business taking a job where that can be a requirement.

    I believe this is what most are saying.
    Altra likes this.
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    I worked in a hospital in suburban Oklahoma City when the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was bombed. I was four months out of nursing school. I heard the explosion while I was outside walking my dog (I wasn't due at the hospital for another six hours), and then the phone rang with the call that you hope you never get: My hospital activating the disaster plan and calling in all off-duty personnel. During the entire time we were caring for the wounded, nobody ever said "I have to leave to take care of my child/parent/pet/whatever." We were all there to do a job, and we were staying for however long it took. People showed up who didn't even work for us, just to see what they could do. An off-duty RN from Dallas who was traveling through town and heard the news on her car radio stopped to help. I heard no complaints, just a dedication to duty. When our CEO came through after several hours and said that we were standing down, there was a deflation in the room I cannot describe. That only meant one thing: There was no one left to save.

    I grant you, we were not stranded for days like we might have been during a hurricane. However, we were in the heart of tornado alley, and that possibility was always there. About six months after I moved west, an F5 tornado struck the Oklahoma City area and did an untold amount of damage. It destroyed the last apartment complex I lived in, and it narrowly missed my former hospital. I heard the CEO on CNN talking about the kind of cases that were coming through ER.

    Being a nurse isn't always convenient. Sometimes we have to work in conditions that most people had rather not bother with. I take pride in doing so, however. Our dedication to serving others is one thing that sets our profession apart.
    diva rn, Altra, wooh, and 5 others like this.
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    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    Well I mean, suff happens, let's say I don't have kids but I have a mother in a wheelchair at home; I'd do the best I could to show up and make arrangements for mom, but if I can't then I can't, and if I'm disciplined so be it. It would be rather annoying to hear someone wave their mommy flag constantly and straight up say "forget that noise, I won't be there regardless because I've got kids;" however I'm not sure that's the position of most people here. I'm sure they would try to do their job before using their kids as a shield from responsibility.
    The problem with making a exception for those who have kids is that so many people have kids and making an exception for them implies that their lives/comfort is worth more than those who don't. It's indirect discrimination and that's wrong.

    Bottom line the OP has been given notice of what is expected of her in advance so if she chooses to disagree with the terms of her employment she is free to seek employment elsewhere.
    Orca and Altra like this.


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