Do nurses make the worst patients?

  1. 2
    hospitals may be the worst place to stay when you're sick

    american hospitals are capable of great medical feats, but they also are plagued by daily errors that cost lives.
    http://bcove.me/wturuxfq interesting video!
    www.aarp.org

    americans are dying in hospitals from preventable medical mistakes. but, patients can minimize their risks by keeping a close eye on their care

    as a recent frequent flyer of medical care......i know why i hate hospitals and i admit i am not the most patient patient. viewing the medical profession as a patient i am increasingly concerned where this is all going to end up and increasingly paranoid when i am hospitalized knowing that it is increasingly difficult avoiding being the victum of a grave mistake.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Mar 5, '12
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  3. 37 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    My sister is having hip replacement surgery tomorrow, and you can bet I'll be spending lots of time at the hospital keeping track of things and advocating for her. The patients I worry about the most are the ones who have no one to do this for them....and yes, nurses are often among them, because everyone from our physicians/surgeons on down to our spouses seem to think we know everything already and don't need education.

    It's been my experience, however, that healthcare providers are sometimes the ones who need it the most. I've been taking care of diabetics for over fifteen years, but when I was diagnosed with DM II about a year ago, I went stupid---suddenly I didn't have a clue as to how to take care of myself. Thankfully I have a friend who's a diabetic educator and she helped me tremendously, as did my oldest daughter who found me some very useful publications (Diabetes for Dummies came in a lot handier than it should have, LOL) and cooks diabetic-friendly meals for me sometimes. But not everyone has those resources, and when the MD says, "You're a nurse, you know how to do this," it's hard to swallow our pride and admit, "Ummmmm.......no I don't".
  5. 6
    I'm about three weeks post op from triple bypass. All except a crazy room mate that kept playing Russian cruses at me. My hospital experience was fantastic. Even though everyone knew that I was a nurse. All procedures were explain to me. Pain was no issue they kept me on cloud nine for the first few days and after that no pain. I had worked in Cardiac before but it was like Buck Rodgers. Before touching me the gloves went on. Everything was great. I knew going in that the stigma of being a nurse, would mean to some of the staff thought that I would ask a lot of silly questions but I didn't. I could tell that this was what they did every day. I got better and so far my heart has not attacked me.
    kool-aide, Epic_RN, sharpeimom, and 3 others like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    My sister is having hip replacement surgery tomorrow, and you can bet I'll be spending lots of time at the hospital keeping track of things and advocating for her. The patients I worry about the most are the ones who have no one to do this for them....and yes, nurses are often among them, because everyone from our physicians/surgeons on down to our spouses seem to think we know everything already and don't need education.

    It's been my experience, however, that healthcare providers are sometimes the ones who need it the most. I've been taking care of diabetics for over fifteen years, but when I was diagnosed with DM II about a year ago, I went stupid---suddenly I didn't have a clue as to how to take care of myself. Thankfully I have a friend who's a diabetic educator and she helped me tremendously, as did my oldest daughter who found me some very useful publications (Diabetes for Dummies came in a lot handier than it should have, LOL) and cooks diabetic-friendly meals for me sometimes. But not everyone has those resources, and when the MD says, "You're a nurse, you know how to do this," it's hard to swallow our pride and admit, "Ummmmm.......no I don't".
    I have found it extremely difficult to navigate insurance companies, billing, and finding a way to coordinate all the specialists and care. I wish I could remove the nurse part off my charts sometimes for the assumption people make that we hear what they are saying when we are scared and confused.

    What drives me nuts is when you have to argue with some about that's not the test, I already had that med, or no not my right arm and left leg it's my left arm and right leg. I found this more prevalent at large teaching facilities with many many indians and no chiefs.

    I found the article and video very interesting.

    VIVA my prayers for your sister for her health and recovery.
  7. 4
    I am glad you are on the mend......
  8. 3
    I find those that have watched the movie: 'Terms of Endearment' to be the the absolutely worst, most obnoxious patients/families to deal with.
    "Oooh, lets yell, scream, carry on, act like total jerks and demand everything be done our OUR and then we will get the best care for our loved ones".

    Really?

    Not where I work.
    nursenotamaid, Altra, and Esme12 like this.
  9. 1
    hello , the things happened on you , i believe it . I just can say this.
    Sincerely hope that nurses would give their patience, and kindness, passion to the patients.
    We have no choice to see the doctor and hospitalize in hospital with the care of nurses when we are sick. Please we need the patience , responsibilities from you .
    Esme12 likes this.
  10. 2
    It's a two way street. One of my favorite patients of all time was a retired RN. Down the hall I had another retired RN who wouldn't lift a finger to help herself, and you couldn't do enough for her.
    Esme12 and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.
  11. 1
    I have found that nurses make the best patients. Nurse's families are a pain in the rear.

    You can have an alert, oriented, verbal patient, who is able to speak for herself and her family will show out every time.
    Esme12 likes this.
  12. 2
    Wow, a Great Thread Esme12!

    I will be totally honest, All the nurses I have taken care of were full of grace for their caregivers, and a total joy to serve. Doctors as Patients, Another story. (although I get nervous with both).

    A Respiratory Therapist had a child with special needs at a hospital I worked at. She frequently got admitted to the hospital where I worked through the ER, and I felt good she would trust us enough to bring her to us. But, generally, I see the nurses being more involved, and advocative when "Their" family member is in the hospital. That's when it gets for real! Lol.
    I would always make an attempt after her discharge to follow-up with her to see if everything met expectations, and where we could improve.

    I am so glad you brought up this thread because I have often wondered how nurses view being on the other side of the care giving. I always wonder what pointers they can come back and give us. What if anything went wrong? Where can I improve my care delivery? Were you informed at all times? Did you know the plan of care at all times? Were there concerns you had that didn't get addressed? See there is a wealth of information a Healthcare Provider can bring back from this experience.

    Kudos to all Nurses that are dealing with health problems and navigating todays systems. My worst fear sometimes is having a wreck on the way home from a 12 hour shift, and being taken back to that place I just barely escaped from minutes earlier!

    This thread is going to be informative!
    VivaLasViejas and Esme12 like this.


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