CNA/Patient Ratio Laws - page 3

Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? To my knowledge, there is not one here in NC. I'm currently in nursing school, and have opted not to get my CNA certification back due to poor work conditions. I got burned out! I was... Read More

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    In my state, the governor did sign a bill earlier this year requiring hospitals to publicly post how many RNs, LPNs, and CNAs were working each shift, along with the ratio of those workers to patients. However, I don't think applies to nursing homes, since I have seen homes that list the number of nurses and aides, but not the ratios of nurses/aides to residents. The bill, however, doesn't legally specify what ratio of CNAs to residents/patients is required, so the bill hasn't changed the ratios at all. I guess they don't want the public to know that most aides regularly have 15-20 residents to take care of for around $8 per hour. Then they wonder why nurse aide jobs have a high turnover rate!

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    Quote from Tommybabe
    In my state, the governor did sign a bill earlier this year requiring hospitals to publicly post how many RNs, LPNs, and CNAs were working each shift, along with the ratio of those workers to patients. However, I don't think applies to nursing homes, since I have seen homes that list the number of nurses and aides, but not the ratios of nurses/aides to residents. The bill, however, doesn't legally specify what ratio of CNAs to residents/patients is required, so the bill hasn't changed the ratios at all. I guess they don't want the public to know that most aides regularly have 15-20 residents to take care of for around $8 per hour. Then they wonder why nurse aide jobs have a high turnover rate!
    The NH I worked in for 2 years/part time had a sign in sheet you were to sign at the beginning of the shift, so anyone could look at it and tell how many nurses or CNAs were working that particular day or shift, but you couldn't tell what the ratio was of nurse or aide to patient was. This is in Arkansas.
    That home was bad, too, for not having adequate staffing.
    When I started there someone warned me to not agree to work the nightshift by myself, and I never had to, because I made it clear in the beginning I would NOT do it.
    But there were several nurses who would do it.
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    On a good day (i.e. everyone shows up) we have:
    16 CNA's on AM with two extra CNA's that do no ADL's but do take care of feedings, ambulation, daily weights and help PT

    8 CNA's on the PM shift with two extra that feed and help PT

    5 on PM's no extras

    On my shift I usually end up with the same 15 people, three of them take care of themselves I just have to bring them dinner and answer the occational call light. The other 12 are total care and aren't congnitive enough to hit the call light, instead they like to slam their bed rails into the wall. I also have two G-tube patients who don't do anything and are a pain to turn. Thankfully the DON overstaffs us by at least one and their job is to take vitals, help transfer/turn, pass water, feed and any of the 'little' things we can't get to. I honestly don't mind the staffing. It's rare that I don't get everything done on time.

    This is a 98 bed facility.

    It is not all sunshine and roses. I have had to change a patient that wasn't on my list because no one else wanted to do it "I'll get to it later." I have had to page people when I needed help. I have had to call someone from the other side of the building because my side is nowhere to be found. I have caught CNA's on the phone in an empty room while I was running my butt off. I am one of the only CNA's that actually does two rounds between 1900 and 2300. I recently asked the DON to not staff me on the same side as a particular CNA because I can't stand her or her lack of work ethic.

    More than likely I will work at this facility after I graduate and while I bridge over to my RN. I know it has it's problems but I love my residents, most of the PM CNA's are excellent and I know all the tricks that the bad CNA's pull.
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    please tell me how many residents should a cna have is there a limit how can you give good care with 15,16 or more residents on a shift
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    Just Call and ask your states odbudsman should be posted at your hospitial somewhere on a wall on a poster .Happy


    Quote from dkayb
    please tell me how many residents should a cna have is there a limit how can you give good care with 15,16 or more residents on a shift
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    Quote from spacenurse
    We have an HPPD (hours per patient day0 system in the law for long term care such as SNFs.
    They count the RN DON who does ZERO care as well as the clerk.
    I gave my two week notice my first week as a CNA in a nursing home. We had 12 to 15 patients to bath, feed, and groom. Linen was locked up and the "Highly educated LVN" would allow is 6 sheets for 12 incontinent patients. She would not give PRN medication to patients in pain.

    The RN on the weekends had us sit everyone on a towel in a wheelchair all day. She medicated the residents so they slept all day. At 2:00 we would clean everyone, put them back to bed, and mop under the wheelchairs where the urine dripped off. PMs would find clean patients in bed. Nights had patients awake all night because they slept all day.

    I am told it is nearly as bad now.
    The public needs to be aware and write, e-mail, and telephone elected officials to increase staffing.
    This needs to be reported to the department of health, human/senior services in your state. Did anyone think of that??
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    I've been a CNA and I have not worked in a nursing home in over 10 years. This thread brings back horrible memories for me. I saw some HORRIBLE things and I'll never work in a nursing home as a CNA ever again. I'd rather work at burger king or Mcdonalds. It's about the same pay and insurance benifits anyways and your exposed to alot less.
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    Wow, I though I had it bad. My facility is a very highly ranked one, but that's because the assisted living and retirement home for Catholic preists are wonderful, not the regular nursing home. On my floor, there are about 50 residents, 2 nurses, and idealistically 5 CNAs that usually end up being 3. At least the place is clean, but I'm waiting for another job so I can make about 50% more than my current $6.90/hr paychecks. After I become a nurse, I doubt that I'd be able to do LTC.
  9. 0
    I'm working in a nursing home for the time being. 3rd shift crew is wonderful, but it is burning us out. we have over 100 residents and some nights only 2 cna's. Corporate wont do anything to help. Complaints have been made to the state but as usual it gets covered up. The company pulls cna's from 3rd to cover on first and second so it looks good to the state and then our residents have to suffer because only 2 people are working 3rd. when you have over 50 people each to tend to and call lights are going off like christmas tree lights, it makes a person angry. What can we do.? We deserve better and the residents deserve better.
    We are told not to let the family know we are working short. I think they can see that for their self. If only state would come in on 3rd shift and talk to cna's without management looking over their shoulders.


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