CNA/Patient Ratio Laws - page 2

by Aneroo

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Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? To my knowledge, there is not one here in NC. I'm currently in nursing school, and have opted not to get my CNA certification back due to poor work conditions. I got burned out! I was... Read More


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    just direct care hours which I believe vary by state. As someone else stated, they count in personnel who don't actually do any direct care. Which is why I'm no longer working as a CNA. The staffing is horrid and terribly unsafe.

    Lorraine
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    Hello,

    I was in your shoes. As an CNA I had worked all 3 shifts at one time or another. In the daytime, when the Big Dogs were there, you had more than enough people. The night shift was the same as yours, 2 CNA's to 50 people. Now to get away with that, they would count the LPN's as a CNA if needed. It was so bad. Lights going off all at the same time. If there was a real emergency then we were really up a creek. I had one night when we had to also take care of any problems with assisted living people on the other end of the building. We got a call, Mrs.X's husband called to say she had died. I ran over there to find a confused Husband, He could not tell me where she was in the apt. I found her sitting in her chair, checked her pulse and she looked up at me saying "Thank you for stopping by" Tears of laughter and relief rolled down my cheeks.

    I love school, and want to make a difference when I get out.

    Take care.


    Quote from Aneroo
    Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? To my knowledge, there is not one here in NC. I'm currently in nursing school, and have opted not to get my CNA certification back due to poor work conditions. I got burned out! I was working in a nursing home, where we would end up with two aides on the night shift, with almost 50 patients, most of whom were alzheimer's or total care. We would start out with three, but management would send home someone (fire them) without telling us we were now short staffed. It wasn't fair to us and employees, and definitly was not fair to the patients! We physically weren't able to care for them all, turn, change, etc. I quit before something happened to a patient that was somehow related to poor care. I feel horrible for the way things went there, and I am ashamed to say I even worked there and put up with the crap for as long as I did. We were written up for not taking supper breaks (we didn't have time between the two of us), so we'd clock out and go back on the floor, then clock back in after 30 minutes. This is one of my reasons for even choosing nursing school, was to somehow try and help change the poor conditions I have seen. Back to the original question, is the a law where you live? How do you feel about it?
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    [QUOTE=Aneroo]Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? there is a website -- owned by the coalition for reform in nursing homes-- under "govt laws" tab, lists laws and/or regs or guidelines for each and every state. how awesome is that?oops-- no, wait. is national citizens coalition for reform in nursing homes-- and obviously it probably does not also cover hospital care, just LTC
    Last edit by merricat on Sep 7, '04 : Reason: factually incorrect
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    Quote from Aneroo
    Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? To my knowledge, there is not one here in NC. I'm currently in nursing school, and have opted not to get my CNA certification back due to poor work conditions. I got burned out! I was working in a nursing home, where we would end up with two aides on the night shift, with almost 50 patients, most of whom were alzheimer's or total care. We would start out with three, but management would send home someone (fire them) without telling us we were now short staffed. It wasn't fair to us and employees, and definitly was not fair to the patients! We physically weren't able to care for them all, turn, change, etc. I quit before something happened to a patient that was somehow related to poor care. I feel horrible for the way things went there, and I am ashamed to say I even worked there and put up with the crap for as long as I did. We were written up for not taking supper breaks (we didn't have time between the two of us), so we'd clock out and go back on the floor, then clock back in after 30 minutes. This is one of my reasons for even choosing nursing school, was to somehow try and help change the poor conditions I have seen. Back to the original question, is the a law where you live? How do you feel about it?

    Since you feel so strongly about what happened at that particular nursing home... did you report it to the state board of health? With anonymous reports, they investigate matters... I have had the pleasure to insure that the facility I worked at receive an Immediate Jeopardy citation... These things should be reported and investigated... it could be your mom/dad in that nursing home!!!
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    Quote from Aneroo
    Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? To my knowledge, there is not one here in NC. I'm currently in nursing school, and have opted not to get my CNA certification back due to poor work conditions. I got burned out! I was working in a nursing home, where we would end up with two aides on the night shift, with almost 50 patients, most of whom were alzheimer's or total care. We would start out with three, but management would send home someone (fire them) without telling us we were now short staffed. It wasn't fair to us and employees, and definitly was not fair to the patients! We physically weren't able to care for them all, turn, change, etc. I quit before something happened to a patient that was somehow related to poor care. I feel horrible for the way things went there, and I am ashamed to say I even worked there and put up with the crap for as long as I did. We were written up for not taking supper breaks (we didn't have time between the two of us), so we'd clock out and go back on the floor, then clock back in after 30 minutes. This is one of my reasons for even choosing nursing school, was to somehow try and help change the poor conditions I have seen. Back to the original question, is the a law where you live? How do you feel about it?
    I work swing shift at an acute/snf facility and we often work with only 2 aides and 50 patients! I am so tired sometimes that I wonder why am I doing this kind of work? My partner another CNA and I do not get lunch breaks , nor do we get to sit down for several hours at the beginning of our shift. I have complained to the DON and no results . I am wondering should I go to the labor board with this? I hate seeing the patients having to tolerate this kind of staffing. They always make sure that day shifts are fully staffed. Looks good to the public, know what I mean. I have worked graveyard shift there and many times I was it the only person to turn, change bedding and answer lights for over 50 total care patients. What , do you think? pumpkin92356 I live in California
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    Quote from pumpkin92356
    I work swing shift at an acute/snf facility and we often work with only 2 aides and 50 patients! I am so tired sometimes that I wonder why am I doing this kind of work? My partner another CNA and I do not get lunch breaks , nor do we get to sit down for several hours at the beginning of our shift. I have complained to the DON and no results . I am wondering should I go to the labor board with this? I hate seeing the patients having to tolerate this kind of staffing. They always make sure that day shifts are fully staffed. Looks good to the public, know what I mean. I have worked graveyard shift there and many times I was it the only person to turn, change bedding and answer lights for over 50 total care patients. What , do you think? pumpkin92356 I live in California

    After first quater of nursing school i became a NA, and the hospital i work at had 15 to 22 pt. to one NA. It was out of control!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :angryfire
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    Quote from petaybee
    I work in a nursing home in Utah and I feel that the CNA to resident ratio is horrible. There are 2 aides on the floor I work and currently 28 residents. We usually try to share the work, but the CNA I'm usually teamed up with spends most of his time on the phone, out smoking or finding other ways to avoid actually working. So I end up doing most of the work for all 28 residents. Very exhausting and frustrating! We have a good majority of these residents that can't stand without assistance, can't do anything to help care for themselves and are incontintent. This makes the job even harder, though I don't mind doing these things, I just need more help in order to get everything done that needs to be done. We usually have about 6 showers to do during the morning shift and about an hour to complete them in. We get written up if we don't take our lunch break and get in trouble if we don't complete our showers. I always feel as though I'm letting the residents down when it comes to caring for them properly. There's always things that get missed because we just don't have the time to do it all. I try to always keep my residents in clean briefs and safe, those are the two most important things we can do, but there are so many others.

    I greatly feel that there needs to be a requirment for the CNA/resident ratio. I dream of the day I only have 10 residents to care for.
    I would complain to your charge and then your DON you don't have to put up with this.I had someone who did this to me and I told them what she was doing .They fired her. I actually doumented all the times she left the floor .in a little book after 3 days went to my charge the charge did nothing then made an appointment with the DON.What would kill me is she the aide would sluff all shift ,till the end and she would still have Pt's to put to bed and would ask for help .I said gee you had all that time to smoke and eat and I didn't get a break so I am taking one now You'll have to ask some one else .Have to take lunch .

    I work in Utah the ratio is 10 to 1 on the non medicare side
    with 3 max beinging bedridden or total care .On the medcare side it is a 5 to one ratio durring the day 7 on 3-11 and nights 2 for 20 Pts Many times I would have to do upwards of 30 on a 3-11 on the non medicare side.That's why I quit doing nursing homes ..(call your Odbudsman in the state.) I think they even have a web site.


    I went in and set up care just recently for my home health agency because a women Pt was not being attended to at night. The assited living had 150 Pt's for 2 aides (one of these aides was also passing meds as well ) is what I was told. I told the assited living nurse charge, durring the day that this was really not good because of the liability issue. Then she told me the normally just have 3 on . couldn't belive it for 150 PT

    Hey if you live in Provo SLC or Odgen area's every want a part time job let me know you sound like your a great aide.Plus the ratio at most would be 1 to 2 if you had a husband and wife ,family to care for But mostally you would do one PT's in the home .
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    This is why I would have to think very hard before leaving our facility to another one. We have our problems but there are so many nursing homes out there that sound HORRIBLE! I just wouldn't want to take a chance of ending up there.
    Quote from Aneroo
    Is there a CNA/Pt ratio law in your state? To my knowledge, there is not one here in NC. I'm currently in nursing school, and have opted not to get my CNA certification back due to poor work conditions. I got burned out! I was working in a nursing home, where we would end up with two aides on the night shift, with almost 50 patients, most of whom were alzheimer's or total care. We would start out with three, but management would send home someone (fire them) without telling us we were now short staffed. It wasn't fair to us and employees, and definitly was not fair to the patients! We physically weren't able to care for them all, turn, change, etc. I quit before something happened to a patient that was somehow related to poor care. I feel horrible for the way things went there, and I am ashamed to say I even worked there and put up with the crap for as long as I did. We were written up for not taking supper breaks (we didn't have time between the two of us), so we'd clock out and go back on the floor, then clock back in after 30 minutes. This is one of my reasons for even choosing nursing school, was to somehow try and help change the poor conditions I have seen. Back to the original question, is the a law where you live? How do you feel about it?
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    As a student, our very first clinical site was a convalescent facility. We noticed the care was poor, with patients sitting in their dry feces for hours! Many of the staff members acted cold-hearted and would rather go outside to smoke than care for the patients. Even our clinical instructor said the care was bad. And clinical instructors usually refrain from speaking badly about any colleagues.
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    Well, Spacenurse. I agree. I got so fed up with being expected to do the impossible...I put up a website to inform the public about our staffing (and other) issues. It's a regional site for C.N.A.s here in North East Tennessee, but I'm pretty sure the info is accurate pretty much anywhere you find a nursing home. Oh, I also wish people would inform the right people to get some laws changed. I'd be happy to get some traffic from any public official who wants the info! It's also very new...and unknown.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Apr 20, '05


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