bedside CPR alerts

  1. Hello!
    Looking to see if any facility has any type of cpr/no cpr alert at the bedside.
    Whether it is a "DNR" wrist band or a sign above the bed.
    I currently work in a facility where there is no identifier at the bedside and ancillary staff such as phlebotomy and cardiology who do not have easy access to patient charts are unaware of their code status.

    Thank you!
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    About MMT5056

    Joined: Sep '14; Posts: 3

    7 Comments

  3. by   RainMom
    We use a wrist band that says "Respect". Simple and easy to identify for any healthcare worker.
  4. by   vampiregirl
    I worked at a SNF that used color coded dots outside the room on the name plate and on the name plate above the bed. That was our "HIPPA" compliant indicator of code status.
  5. by   AJJKRN
    Quote from RainMom
    We use a wrist band that says "Respect". Simple and easy to identify for any healthcare worker.
    While I like the concept, since the meaning is not universal to all healthcare facilities, if the patient is transferred to another facility then this arm band could very well either cause unnecessary confusion or just get overlooked. My facility has changed the purple arm bands that had stated DNR to NO CPR instead.

    Wouldn't it be nice if we all used universal arm bands with their respective meanings?
  6. by   Buckeye.nurse
    I suspect that this topic is state specific. In Ohio, we have two different categories of DNR--DNR comfort care, and DNR arrest. There's an interesting PDF on our state's laws concerning DNR here. https://www.odh.ohio.gov/-/media/ODH...ice/dnrfaq.pdf. Having moved here from a state where it was very difficult to make oneself a DNR, I'm a huge fan of my state's laws.

    With that being said, since we have 2 different categories, we have very specific wristbands. They are purple (which I think is a pretty universal color). We place the patient's hospital ID sticker on it, along with a DNR arrest label or DNR comfort care label.

    My advice would be to first check the laws for your state. After that maybe a quick literature search, or a search of practices at large treatment hospitals in your state might give you some good ideas. Best of luck on this important initiative!
  7. by   psu_213
    Out of curiosity, why is it necessary for phlebotomy, etc. to know that a pt is a DNR? I don't remember a bedside alert for "no CPR" (nor a wrist band) at any of the facilities at which I've worked.
  8. by   Double Dunker
    Quote from psu_213
    Out of curiosity, why is it necessary for phlebotomy, etc. to know that a pt is a DNR? I don't remember a bedside alert for "no CPR" (nor a wrist band) at any of the facilities at which I've worked.
    Aren't most of the hospital employees required to have BLS certification? If so, the assumption would be those staff members in the room at the time of arrest would begin CPR, so it is important to know. My facility doesn't use armbands, or anything else for that matter. I wish we would.
  9. by   psu_213
    Quote from Double Dunker
    Aren't most of the hospital employees required to have BLS certification? If so, the assumption would be those staff members in the room at the time of arrest would begin CPR, so it is important to know. My facility doesn't use armbands, or anything else for that matter. I wish we would.
    I see your point, but I can't imagine a dietary aide starting CPR on a patient in a room when they go in to deliver a tray. Code status needs to be thoroughly communicated with clinical staff, but I really can't think of a good reason why ancillary staff would get much value from it.

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