12 hour shifts...dangerous? - page 6

This is a general question, but I was talking to a nurse and was shocked to find out that nurses can be forced to work four hours overtime on top of their twelve hour shifts for a total of sixteen hours. To her, she says this can... Read More

  1. 0
    Just jumping in, haven't read the 5 pages of comments prior,
    but, TO THE OP,
    and your shock at nurses being ordered in 4 hours early, or ordered to stay 4 hours or more later,
    than their scheduled shift---------
    DO READ POST #91 on this thread

    http://allnurses.com/collective-barg...05-page10.html

    (some further discussions on my experience follows after post #91, when an incredulous nurse did not believe me, had questions, which we talked about for a page or two afterwards)

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  2. 2
    Quote from MotherRN
    Where I was working, they took the half hour break out of the 8 hr shift pay automatically. But, you weren't REALLY allowed to take the time off during the shift. Legally they had to show that a break was given on paper. Does this happen everywhere?
    This does not happen everywhere. Do not work for free. If you don't get your 30 minute, uninterrupted break you should punch "no lunch" and get paid for your time.

    They might pull the "you need to work on your time management" card so encourage your coworkers to punch this way also when they don't get their breaks. On my floor, we pact to punch "no lunch" when we don't get out breaks so no one gets singled out. Works quite well.

    Hijack over. Wish my workplace offered 12 hour shifts. I'd punch "no lunch" BID.
    KelRN215 and sharonp30 like this.
  3. 1
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    I've worked twelve hours. I can do day shift (easy peasy), but I cannot do a twelve hour night shift. It is too brutal for me. But I could not do a sixteen hour shift and the thought of being forced to work four extra hours makes me cringe.
    12 hour nights is a breeze for me. I HATE staying but have done it. i would quit if forced to do five 8s or four 10s. one of the biggest reasons i went into nursing was for three 12s
    sharonp30 likes this.
  4. 0
    Frankly the 30 hours of work and call of the residents worries me maybe more than a nurse doing 16. some services you can sleep all of your call hours but not many of them. in seeing consults all night than to the OR in the a.m..... To those that have never been forced to stay thats great! not like that everywhere.
  5. 0
    As someone who is going to be entering this field, I am interested to know if the more experienced nurses feel that if the charge nurse, or nurse supervisor, etc. stepped up, would you be able to take breaks and or lunch? Or is it a case of everyone just being stretched too thin? Is this better in a Not For Profit, or is it worse? Just some things that I wonder about. Thanks everyone.
  6. 0
    I worked both eights and twelves. I HATED the twelves. It made family life very difficult, esp. when my husband had travel. Then there were the holidays...which on twelves I totally missed. As I got older, the twelves were just too taxing, esp. in the intensive care unit.
  7. 0
    I worked 10 hr shifts. It was great!! There were two 10s and a 5 hr pm shift in a day. It allowed for shift meetings, staff education, and also extra help during visiting hrs and dinner. The 5 hr shift never had a problem with staffing because the hospital paid for 40 hrs, even though only working 25. Was great for students.
  8. 1
    I work 12.5 hr shifts on a busy Tele floor. It can be brutal or a walk in the park. It truly depends on the patient acuity on that particular day. I have done 4 hours additional on my shift, only when I have patients that are pretty stable and are ready for discharge the next day. 12.5 hours are the best, 3 days on and 4 off. BTW, I am not a young new nurse, I am a middle aged new nurse. I have the drive and the aches and pains afterwards as well. LOL
    anotherone likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from sharonp30
    As someone who is going to be entering this field, I am interested to know if the more experienced nurses feel that if the charge nurse, or nurse supervisor, etc. stepped up, would you be able to take breaks and or lunch? Or is it a case of everyone just being stretched too thin? Is this better in a Not For Profit, or is it worse? Just some things that I wonder about. Thanks everyone.
    I have 6 nurses working and I am charge. We work a buddy system 3 teams of 2. So nurse 1 goes to tea and nurse 2 covers her bells. Swap over 30 min later. I could not physically cover 6 tea breaks. That's 3 hours of my day. As charge I have a different role. I am a resource, discharge co ordinator after 5 pm ward clerk organising admissions, if someone is confused suddenly I am usually trying to organize a behavioral nurse and watching them myself if I can't get one.

    I certainly will cover someones break if their buddy and themselves are flat out.

    Mind you I work in Australia in a very pro union hospital. Look up Australia nursing federation Victoria branch to see what we did at the beginning of the year
  10. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN


    *** I see they failed to take into account the errors that will result from the exoudous of the most experienced and skilled nurses from the bedside if you take away one of our primary benifits.


    Usually the "12 hour shifts are unsafe!" studies also fail to take into account that shorter shifts mean more errors caused by miscommunications during more frequent handoffs.
    PMFB-RN likes this.


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