Please quit wasting my time: Interview Advice from Hiring Manager - page 23

by Teacher Sue

I have spent the last two days interviewing candidates for an open RN position on my floor. Last week I went through the 14 resumes HR sent over to pick out the ones I wanted to interview. Eliminated eight of these for various... Read More


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    If you don't have the correct attire I suggest borrowing money from someone to at least get a good suit for interviews. If you can't visit some of the thrift stores. Professional attire is a must when interviewing. Making the statement some don't have much is not going to fly with many managers.
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    Which would you prefer bringing home a paycheck or changing your email?,
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    Quote from samadams8
    With respect, honestly, how in the world does that come close to anything objective? What I mean is that as striving for objectivity should be there--while looking for or against a particular attitude can cloud balance in thinking and understanding. Attitudes can appear "good" or "bad." What in the world do you mean by "attitude?" I am asking this b/c I truly believe people should be evaluated in a fair and objective ways--at least as much as it is possible.

    I say this b/c it almost smacks, IMHO, of a huge part of the problem in nursing in general. "Let's hire for 'LIKEABILITY' over all else."

    People that are strong, independent critical thinkers can frequently be misunderstood by others as having a "less than likeable attitude."

    I am sure that you strive to incorporate many things into your analysis and evaluation of potential candidates, and I am also certain that the process can be far from objective. But balance and objectivity, at least by my ethics, has to be what leads one's thinking in these situations. The very person that you or the unit's "influential others" may consider as having a certain "attitude" may end up being one of the strongest nurses for your patients as well as the whole team. "Different and independent thinker" does NOT mean trouble. Unfortunately there are those that can be threatened by free thinkers. Those that feel threatened can try to undermine people with great potential.

    No doubt, yours is a tough job. I just want to clarify and at least believe for now that the tone/meaning of "attitude" involves something much more than what it often can tranlate to in today's world of "likeability above all else."


    I have to disagree with you. Attitude IS everything. First impressions IS EVERYTHING!!!the candidate could not even put their best foot forward in trying to land a job( especially in this economy) how in the world are they going to impress later on?.
    joanna73 likes this.
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    Teacher Sue,
    When I worked in a hospital, I loved it. Then we we taken over, and our floor super changed. Didn't have a problem with that, just when all the long-term LPNs were either let go, or encouraged to go. Then I was let go -for my attitude. I was upset because after 3 years of working weekends, I was scheduled for a Monday night and was not informed (it was scheduled Monday afternoon). My point being is after working there for 8 years, being let go like that hurt my reputation. How can I impress a nurse manager without it sounding like sour-grapes?
    Last edit by blm1228 on Mar 24 : Reason: correction in spelling, sentence structure.
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    Some posters just do not get it. It is not the job of the recruiter to be fair or considerate or understanding. Her job is to find the candidate who will contribute the most to the hiring institution. If one candidate dresses and speaks more professionally than another, the recruiter does not care why; she is not your mommy or your therapist. She is a business professional who will hire the candidate that presents best. Period.

    No one owes you a job. You have to compete for jobs by looking and sounding better than all of the other candidates. If you have had personal problems with drugs, changed jobs frequently, or show up dressed badly, that is your problem, she does not give a hoot why.

    Does that sound harsh? Damned right it is harsh! It is called, "the real world." If you want to stay where you are, stay home and pout. If you want to make a better life yourself, put on your big girl panties, wake up to reality, quit ******** about how unfair it is, and get to work on becoming a winner in a competitive world.
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    Exactly. When I used to interview candidates in previous positions, I knew within a few minutes if I wanted to hire them or not. I have never been someone to ask lengthy questions beyond the standard types.

    Why? The attitude, demeanor and appearance of the candidate speaks volumes. Do they smile? Are they articulate? Are they dressed appropriately? Have they researched the organization at all? Very basic standards, yet it's surprising how many candidates don't make the effort. And please, be punctual! Leave the house earlier, and grab a coffee if you need to sit and wait.

    Resumes are another issue. Be precise. Nurse managers do not have time to read a list of all the basic skills that every nurse should have (medication administration, time management, basic assessment). Briefly highlight areas that will make you personally stand out amongst the other 100 applicants.
    BrandonLPN likes this.
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    Quote from joanna73

    I knew within a few minutes if I wanted to hire them or not. I have never been someone to ask lengthy questions beyond the standard types.

    Why? The attitude, demeanor and appearance of the candidate speaks volumes. Do they smile? Are they articulate? Are they dressed appropriately? Have they researched the organization at all? Very basic standards, yet it's surprising how many candidates don't make the effort..
    Yes, and no
    While a bad attitude, demeanor, or appearance will cause me to exclude a candidate, most candidates can fake it for a 1/2 hour if they really try. Remember that sociopaths can be quite charming.

    Had a candidate, very charming, great appearance, knew all the right things to say. That was the problem. She was just too smooth and polished. She would've made a great sales person or public speaker, but even with follow up questions I couldn't get to the "real person".

    I passed.
    joanna73 and LadyFree28 like this.
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    True enough. Sociopaths are highly deceptive. It's the package though. If they look good, but they can't follow the line of questioning, this will signal red flags.


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