Please quit wasting my time: Interview Advice from Hiring Manager - page 22

by Teacher Sue

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I have spent the last two days interviewing candidates for an open RN position on my floor. Last week I went through the 14 resumes HR sent over to pick out the ones I wanted to interview. Eliminated eight of these for various... Read More


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    lvn2bsoon: If your soft spoken and quiet personality has you frozen in interviews or mumbling answers or not able to reply except for a few words, your chances of being hired are slim in today's market. This is where you need to take advantage of any interviewing classes and practice, practice, practice.

    Hiring managers are focused on customer service. If that doesn't come across in interviews, they will move to the next candidate. If you can't speak to an interviewer with enthusiasm and coherence, the assumption is that you won't be interactive with patients and will just do your tasks without engaging with the patient or the family.

    We also don't want someone who doesn't shut up and let the interviewer ask questions!
    itsmejuli, CountyRat, joanna73, and 1 other like this.
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    I have recently transferred from a small community ER to a large teaching ER in the same healthcare system. In both jobs my co-workers commented on how I fit right in. It may not seem fair or pertinent to some but it is apparently important to my co-workers, who are also my team members. Having the other staff like you makes the day go easier. In the end it makes for better care and outcomes for the patient. Some people just don't fit in. I've seen a lot over my 30 years of working (6 as a nurse). The good, the bad, and the "huh?" Just my humble opinion.
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    "I do get sick of the pat answers. they usually make the job candidate sound insincere anyway. That is why I never ask "What are your weaknesses." Quote from an earlier post.

    I drink to much coffee and have to run to the bathroom a lot. OK so I wouldn't say that but its too true! This is an lol - these posts get to heavy and need a little levity.

    BTW my real weakness is I don't like to ask for help because I'm afraid it will make me look weak and incapable of handling my assignment. I'm working on it and know that everybody needs help sometimes and I certainly don't view my co-workers that way when they ask for help.

    The person who does the interviewing knows what they are looking for. Like it or not they are responsible for the people they hire and have supervisors they must answer to also. They know what personalities will fit into their team.
    Last edit by DebanamRN on Sep 8, '12 : Reason: Clarification
    CountyRat likes this.
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    Quote from armyicurn

    I read your initial posting. I just have a question. Could you please elaborate on the inappropriate email account? I think I know what you are trying to say but at 0430 in the morning where I am currently, is starting to take its toll on my tired brain.
    I'm not the OP, but ... I have a friend who works as a recruiter for a children's hospital. She always uses the example of an applicant she had with the e-mail name of H8skids@ ... She also had an applicant whose voicemail recording that involved the woman yelling at her kids. These types of things really turn off prospective employers.

    But they are amusing to collect as examples.
    joanna73 and wooh like this.
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    Quote from DebanamRN
    I do get sick of the pat answers. they usually make the job candidate sound insincere anyway. That is why I never ask "What are your weaknesses."

    I drink to much coffee and have to run to the bathroom a lot. OK so I wouldn't say that but its too true!
    That's the main reason I DO ask the question. I use it as a gauge to see how much I can trust the applicant's answers as a whole. If someone BS's me on the weaknesses question, I know I can't trust their answers. If someone sounds over-rehearsed, I suspect they have rehearsed answers to other questions as well.

    To me, the key to answering the question well is to be sincere ... to talk about a real weakness that you have or have had in the past ... but to focus on how you are over-coming that and dealing with it so that it will not be a problem if you are offered the job. Or better yet, to pick a weakness that is totally understandable and expected for someone in your situation. For example, for a new grad to talk about their lack of experience, their need for mentoring, etc. Then be prepared to talk about you are going to deal with that. The interviewer already knows you have that weakness, so you are not hurting your chances by admiting it -- and you can use the question as an opportunity to make a positive impression by descibing how you are going to deal with it successfully.

    Anything less that real and sincere though, is a big turn-off for me.
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    Quote from lvn2bsoon
    That's pretty sad. And discouraging. I am softspoken and quiet, so if you don't like that quality, you won't hire me?
    Did I say I wouldn't hire you? No. I made a general comment based on the fact that everyone hires based on likeability, to some degree. That's the way it is. And usually, if you have insightful interviewing skills, as a manager, you won't hire or dismiss an applicant based on one quality alone. Various factors come into play. So, just because you may be soft spoken does not mean I won't offer you the job. However, if I feel that you are coming across as overly sensitive to my questions, then that could potentially go against you. I think you've interpreted too much into my post.
    wooh likes this.
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    Quote from lvn2bsoon
    That's pretty sad. And discouraging. I am softspoken and quiet, so if you don't like that quality, you won't hire me?

    Sigh, it should be balanced, and those interviewing should strive hard to use objective standards of evaluation--as much as is possible.

    Likeability can vary and is capricious. Obvious problematic attitudes, will, however, be screened. People have to demonstrate that they can work with others. Sometimes, however, I have seen people get labeled with this negative evaluation, and it's simply not true.
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    Awesome advice! It's nice to hear what the interviewer thinks from time to time. Thanks for sharing!
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    I think this article was great and I'd seriously like to give a free seminar to new grads and maybe some current "professionals". It amazes me that I work with and meet new medical profs all the time who can't read, write, speak or articulate their thought in an intelligent manner. It's sickening really. I've worked in a LTC facility, where the charge nurse was 400 pounds, rude to staff, residents, families and everyone else, sat on her lazy butt @ the nurses station and slept, ate or talked on the phone..and she was allowed to work for several years, because she had no life and therefore would work any day, any time, any shift...She had tons of money because of it...and you know...she filed for bankruptcy and eventually was fired. Karma is a beautiful thing! But, back on subject- because there are so many unprofessional doofuses out there, it makes it much easier for others to obtain jobs...sad but true!
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    Quote from PROUD2BANLPN
    I think this article was great and I'd seriously like to give a free seminar to new grads and maybe some current "professionals". It amazes me that I work with and meet new medical profs all the time who can't read, write, speak or articulate their thought in an intelligent manner. It's sickening really. I've worked in a LTC facility, where the charge nurse was 400 pounds, rude to staff, residents, families and everyone else, sat on her lazy butt @ the nurses station and slept, ate or talked on the phone..and she was allowed to work for several years, because she had no life and therefore would work any day, any time, any shift...She had tons of money because of it...and you know...she filed for bankruptcy and eventually was fired. Karma is a beautiful thing! But, back on subject- because there are so many unprofessional doofuses out there, it makes it much easier for others to obtain jobs...sad but true!
    This is a particularly nasty post. Whether or not the charge nurse was doing her job has nothing to do with her weight. And who are you to assume that she had no life, that she had "tons of money" or that her bankruptcy filing wasn't legitimate. You're making a lot of assumptions here.


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