Nursing Interviews: Basic Post-Interview Etiquette - pg.2 | allnurses

Nursing Interviews: Basic Post-Interview Etiquette - page 2

Many job seekers become elated after having been granted that prized interview. After all, it is extremely easy for our online applications and electronically-submitted resumes to forever disappear... Read More

  1. Visit  Burlshoe114 profile page
    #13 1
    This is actually a really nice thread, as I am following your advice as we go!
    The problem I am having with following up with the HR nursing recruiter or even sending a thank you note is that they don't accept calls (phone tree), and there is no address or live person available to even send a note to.
    I hate to mail a generic thank you note to HR, and unless you leave a phone message in the generic HR mailbox to an HR recruiter, you have no other contact with HR.

    How do you get around this? Any advice?
  2. Visit  Patti_RN profile page
    #14 0
    Quote from Burlshoe114
    The problem I am having with following up with the HR nursing recruiter or even sending a thank you note is that they don't accept calls (phone tree), and there is no address or live person available to even send a note to.

    How do you get around this? Any advice?
    If you had an interview, send a thank you note to that interviewer--you were given their name and contact info when your interview was scheduled.

    I've heard of people sending thank you notes after they email their resume--this is way over the top and is not appropriate. Ditto for contact after meeting at job fairs or recruiting conferences. An applicant should follow up only after an interview--don't call, email, or send notes to HR or a manager after you've submitted an application or resume, or after you exchanged cards and spoke to someone at a meet-and-greet or job symposium.
  3. Visit  appleman profile page
    #15 0
    Should u give a thank you card after the interview
  4. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    #16 0
    Quote from appleman
    Should u give a thank you card after the interview
    I would mail a 'thank you' card within 48 hours after your interview took place to thank whomever.
  5. Visit  CP2013 profile page
    #17 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I would mail a 'thank you' card within 48 hours after your interview took place to thank whomever.
    What if it's only a phone interview and you have no contact info for the HR person or whoever called??
  6. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    #18 0
    Quote from CP2013
    What if it's only a phone interview and you have no contact info for the HR person or whoever called??
    This is a tough one. I would send a general thank-you card to the director of human resources to thank them for the interview. Be sure to reaffirm your interest in the position. This move will, at the very least, keep you in their radar.
  7. Visit  CP2013 profile page
    #19 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    This is a tough one. I would send a general thank-you card to the director of human resources to thank them for the interview. Be sure to reaffirm your interest in the position. This move will, at the very least, keep you in their radar.
    Where I applied, they only give you the general phone # for HR. They don't give you any information regarding their location. Honest to goodness. I managed to get an email and sent an email saying thank you. Other than that, they keep their HR very hush hush.

    Matter of fact, my neighbor used to work for this particular HR, she worked from home. They were the "recruiting department" of HR so they didn't have an on site address! How crazy is that?!

    I have actual gotten in touch with a recruiting agency in hopes that my resume will find the right hands when it's time for me to start looking for a new grad residency. Human Resources seems like such a road block to clinical professionals. I wonder why they don't use retired RNs for this type of work? Someone who knows what to look for besides a list of a few terms that an applicant needs to have in their application to trigger a response. Very frustrating.
  8. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    #20 0
    Quote from CP2013
    I have actual gotten in touch with a recruiting agency in hopes that my resume will find the right hands when it's time for me to start looking for a new grad residency. Human Resources seems like such a road block to clinical professionals. I wonder why they don't use retired RNs for this type of work? Someone who knows what to look for besides a list of a few terms that an applicant needs to have in their application to trigger a response. Very frustrating.
    Yes, indeed. Very frustrating.

    HR personnel are the gatekeepers to most companies because they filter the applicants, and therefore, strongly impact who gets hired and who doesn't.
  9. Visit  CP2013 profile page
    #21 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yes, indeed. Very frustrating.

    HR personnel are the gatekeepers to most companies because they filter the applicants, and therefore, strongly impact who gets hired and who doesn't.
    But often times they don't understand the clinical aspects. I have had recruiters tell me that 16 months of hospital tech float pool experience doesn't qualify for the 12 month of hospital tech experience? I asked why and they said "we didn't realize you had more than 12...sorry"

    REALLY?!? Argh.
  10. Visit  sourapril profile page
    #22 0
    I interviewed a week ago for a health department job. I actually called my interviewer the next day of my interview. Thanked her for giving me the interview, told her again how much I would love to work there, asked a few questions that I forgot to include during the interview. But I never heard back from her. So should I call her again or email her? Would that be seen as harassment?
  11. Visit  Idaho_nurse profile page
    #23 1
    Quote from Nascar nurse
    I've been interviewing and making hiring decisions for 15+ years (in LTC). I'm not sure that I have EVER received a Thank You note and honestly, it doesn't bother me one bit. I'm doubtful it would change my initial opinion of an applicant one way or another.

    I do agree with following up in one week after an interview. It's unfortunate to admit, but sometimes I just get busy and lose track of time and forget to call an applicant back in a timely manner. I do not mind the call at all but I can tell you those "stalker types" lose the job every time!
    I have also been in a position to conduct interviews, and the hiring process, and frankly, the places I have worked, I have worn so many hats that dealing with job seeking emails, thank you notes, and phone calls are a pain in the rear. I think it is not so bad when HR is JUST HR, but in smaller places, you are often a floor nurse, aide, management, conduct audits, etc. etc. I usually told someone something like "if you do not hear from me by such and such time, I am sorry, but a more qualified candidate has been selected" I have however, appreciated a well versed individual, who shows up early, is dressed appropriately, and understands the position that was being interviewed for with rehearsed responses, and not all "ah... well... " fill in the blanks.
    For those job seekers out there and as an fyi, most nurses are fluent in B.S., so if you do not have the experience in a particular area, do not try to sugar coat it and make yourself sound better than what you are. Enthusiasm is good but acting like you have done it all, is "off-putting". My advice? know your worth, and while you may need the job, do not name drop, do not act like you are better than everyone else, and be honest about your experience. I have sent people on to do a 2nd interview simply because they were very personable and I felt they would be a good team player.

    Just MY take on what I have done in my career.
  12. Visit  MicsterRN profile page
    #24 0
    For the thank you card naysayers, I might implore you to consider the thank you card as such: Reinforce how your skills and experience will align with the requirements of the position and the value you will add. Use what you learned in the interview - prove you listened actively. The purpose of the "Thank You" isn't actually to give thanks... it's the last sales pitch. It's accomplished under the guise "I appreciate your time and the opportunity to learn about ...."

    I think an initial phone screen or HR interview warrants a Thank You email, but once you get the peer interview pod or nursing manager interview, get out the nice pen and stationery. The practice of sending hand-written Thank You cards is a lost art, which is precisely why it will be noticed. It takes extra time, thoughtfulness, and it takes an actual stamp. If you are willing to go the extra mile for a competive position, these are just the nuances that could sway the decision.

    I have been successful for each job I really wanted.
  13. Visit  sassynerd profile page
    #25 0
    This post has been great! Many tips and insight! One question I have is I interviewed for a 10 person panel consisting of HR, nurse managers, staff nurses, educators and directors. Is it appropriate to send each of them a thank you email that is the same message? Or should I write something different for all 10?

    I am choosing the email route because with so many people, I think it can quickly get to them and remind them of my interest.

    Any need to follow that up with a thank you card as well for each person? Is that overkill? Also, it may be hard to track down the staff nurses.

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

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