Need thoughts/advice pertaining to interview

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    So I have been in acute care (neuroscience and spine unit) for almost 6 months and can no longer handle the stresses of this job. I run, run, run and hardly ever get my breaks and have lost a lot of weight. I recently had an interview at a clinic and I really want this job- I really think that I would thrive there and enjoy it. I really had a tough time describing to them why I wanted to leave acute care as I was afraid of saying the wrong thing so I said something like "I would thrive in an environment where things are more routine and narrowed" and I'm not sure I was clear enough or that they understood. I dunno, what would have been the appropriate response to why I wanted to leave acute care? I tried to focus more on why I want to work there- that I think I would enjoy it and hope to stay there long term. Also, when you leave the interview and they give you a card and say contact me with any questions that come up that you may have forgotten, do they really want you to contact them. I guess I'm wondering if I shouldn't call back and try to clarify why this job would be a better fit for me than acute care and ask about her management type/etc. as I had forgotten to do this. What are your thoughts?
    Joe V likes this.
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  3. 2 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Don't call them back, it'll sound like back-pedaling.

    When you send your follow up thnk you note, which you should be doing anyways, you can use that opportunity to elaborate on seeking a better work- life balance, more set hours, whatever.
    biblepoet likes this.
  5. 0
    I deffinetly agree with the back-pedaling. Thanks so much for replying I had actually forgotten about the thank you letter! Whew! Thanks for reminding me! I'm still not sure though how to get my point across as to why clinic nursing and not acute care. I know how I feel about it but don't know how the right way to say it would be. Clinic would be more routine/focused, a different type of stress, not so many patients, slower-paced, patients are stable.


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