I want to know what managers really think of applicants in monitoring programs

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    I know it is illegal to tell a person that they were not hired because of the monitoring program, so most people pick some other reason (i.e. more qualified applicant).

    But I want to know what managers really think of people in monitoring programs. What kinds of things would you say no way, I am not hiring them and what would you tolerate, if you were to hire them at all as far as why people are in them? What kind of expectations would you put on them? Does it bother you having to fill out periodic forms (this is the one that scares me the most. That managers will say "I don't want to deal with it")?

    If they were out of work for a certain time due to stipulations or not being able to find a nursing job, would you hold that against them? Also, if you decided against the applicant (not for qualification reasons), what advice would you give them? Keep in mind not everyone in the programs diverted drugs or did illegal drugs.

    Anything else you want to add, I would appreciate. Not being able to find a job while in one (even after being cleared) or even after the program is my BIGGEST fear.

    Thanks.
    Last edit by wish_me_luck on Sep 4, '12 : Reason: Additional Info.
  2. 2 Comments so far...

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    For me, it would depend on how you are doing in the program. I did hire someone in the past who was in a monitoring program. She had been in an accident which resulted in several surgeries and the loss of her small daughter. She was prescribed long term pain medication because of the surgeries and used the medication to dull the emotional pain as well as the physical pain. She realized she had a problem and entered the program voluntarily. She discussed this freely in her interview. I hired her because she impressed me with this story, her clinical knowledge and professional behavior, as well as her positive attitude. On the other hand, someone who does not take responsibility for themselves and blames others for their situation would not get the time of day from me. Every person has a story. No one sets out to have a substance abuse problem. It is more important to me how the person is dealing with their problem and what they are doing to repair their life.
    CrufflerJJ, brillohead, and itsmejuli like this.
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    Okay, thanks. I take responsibility for mine. I am actually a new grad but I self disclosed on my application for licensure, hence why I am already in the program straight out of the gate (I have given the whole explanation in the Nurses Recovery section). I am having to do Caduceus (AA for health care providers) and I go to my psych appts like I am supposed to. So, I am participating like I am supposed to. I don't know about other states but where I live, you can't work in health care until the monitoring program clears you. So, I want to get a part time job as a cashier until then to pay for my drug screens and any extra money I have I want to split between saving and taking classes that I am interested in and could be beneficial to my career (I really want to take a documentation class and EKG class. Those are two right off that I plan to take.) and join some professional organizations.

    If I was able to secure a nurse position, I would want to keep the side job (part time) in hopes of moving back to pharmacy section (In process of trying to get pharmacy tech license approved). I would like to do both nursing and pharmacy tech because I want a change of pace (I don't want nursing burn out) and I think it would help me learn the different drugs (and be familiar with new drugs on the market) and have some dealings with insurance companies, which would lead to better care of my patients. I have done a little nursing assistant (non-certified) work too. Even though it sounds like I am all over the place, I think it could be beneficial knowing a little of everything and hopefully, giving me an edge in the new grad job world. It just scares me about the monitoring program though and I know that it's easier for a manager to say they don't want to deal with it.


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