I really screwed up on an interview

  1. 0
    Recently I interviewed for a position I really wanted. Interviewing has always been an extreme weakness of mine. I choked and gave a lot answers I didn't feel confident with. Needless to say, I didn't get the position. I have read on career websites that it is acceptable to follow up by asking the interviewer what went wrong and for suggestions on how to improve. If it is acceptable to do this, could someone also maybe give me advice on how to tactfully let the interviewer know this and let them know that I would still be interested in the future and that I hope I didn't ruin the chance of ever being considered.

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  2. 14 Comments...

  3. 6
    I usually email the person, thank them for the opportunity to interview, and state that you would like "feeback on your interview" to help you in the future. Most people will only take the time to email you back one sentence but sometimes it can be valuable feedback. I didn't get a job for lack of "leadership experience." Based on who got the position, I'm pretty sure I know why I wasn't chosen, and that wasn't it. But hearing their comments can be somewhat subjective. Just take it with a grain of salt. It doesn't mean you're a bad nurse or won't get a job. It's just one person's opinion. nothing more, nothing less.
    rnj77, BrookeeLou_RN, Nasra80RN, and 3 others like this.
  4. 13
    db, you honestly don't know why you didn't get the job.
    maybe it had to do with the interview, maybe not.

    i agree that often, it has to do with how you clicked w/the interviewer.
    as suggested, i would send them a note, thanking them for their time/consideration, and that you'd truly appreciate any feedback as to how you might improve your interviewing skills.
    it also wouldn't hurt to let them know how nervous you were, and that you fear your anxiety may have disqualified you from being hired.
    sometimes when you show the human side of you, it makes you more desirable as a candidate.

    i remember one interview i had many yrs ago, where i kept on tripping over my words, followed by nervous laughter and persistent hand-to-neck gestures, which is what i do when i'm nervous.
    i CLEARLY messed up and was hired anyway, because the interviewer found me "simply charming and adorable" as i struggled through our time together.
    so in essence, i was hired because i was so darned pathetic.
    but because i didn't have an ounce of pride, i took the job.

    you just never know why one may be hired, or not hired.
    but you have nothing to lose, by asking for input.

    wishing you the very best.

    leslie
    grudgrime, rnj77, AnonRNC, and 10 others like this.
  5. 1
    I would go for it. It'll give you a peace of mind, you'll get feedback on how to improve in the future, and I think this will make you look good to this employer (showing you're interested in self improvement). You never know, they might have another opening soon. Good luck DoubleblessedRN!
    DoubleblessedRN likes this.
  6. 2
    Interviewing is an art. If you live in CA then you can go to the offices that do unemployment and they have free interview classes. Most states should have something similar.

    You know all interviews are going to have the a few "freebies"; tells us about yourself, why do you want to work here, do you have anything further to say (at end).
    Some form of these will be asked. Be sure to have rehearsed answers. Because you know you can nail these, you can at least take comfort in that and hopefully relax.

    Most importantly, know the job you are applying for and the company; even understand politics, missions, and statistics about the facility. It takes effort to learn this stuff but if you drop little job/employer specific nuggets you will demonstrate your ability and desire for the job.

    Above all, interviewers want to make sure they hire the best person. Sometimes that isn't going to be you. If you are notified that you did not ge the job by someone that actually interviewed you then simply ask what the reasons were. Most folks don't want to waist time on someone they are not hiring and they may not have the time. They may have multiple calls to make and cannot critique everyone. Good luck
  7. 1
    "in essence, i was hired because i was so darned pathetic."

    Love it!!!!
    JacknSweetpea likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from DenverHopeful
    "in essence, i was hired because i was so darned pathetic."

    Love it!!!!
    Wish I could say the same. Thanks everyone for the replies.
  9. 0
    Go ahead and ask for feedback but do not hold your breath..
    Most nurses are saying they do not even get told they did not get the Job..no call no nothing.. so I can not imagine anyone taking the time to tell you why....it might be they did not like the color of you hair but they will never tell you the truth.

    The idea about the employment office and practicing interview is fantastic idea!!!!
  10. 1
    You can ask for feedback and see what they say, but more than likely they will not give you any valuable feedback. I used to work in HR (not in healthcare, but this rule applies everywhere) and the general rule of thumb was never, ever give detailed info on why someone wasn't hired. You were always supposed to be vague, as in "thank you for your interest in XYZ company, but another candidate was a stronger fit for this position." If you didn't get the job because you dressed inappropriately for the interview, sounded really nervous, and asked right off the bat if you could leave early every Friday to pick up your kids, we sure as heck could not tell you that. So most of the time, you'll never know why you didn't get the job, and often you'll never know why you DID get the job over other people.
    BrandonLPN likes this.
  11. 0
    Being in an interview is one of THE most stressful things to go through! You are being scrutinised in every which way - making you feel MORE uncomfortable than ever!
    I would ask the interviewer for feedback - they may tell you the truth, they may not. But do listen carefully to any criticism and ask how you could improve on what they are talking about, ie: were you too nervous, sweaty, was your appearance not up to scratch? And don't get offended too much either.
    Interviewing IS an art - the poster who said this was not exaggerating.
    You could do interviewing at home and someone could tape you. Or go to an employment office and they may be able to do mock interviews with you to boost your conifdence. The more you do, the more confident you will become.
    We have all loused up and lost the 'dream' job we wanted. It happens. But you will get better - you just got to have a bit more confidence in yourself.
    Oh and always dress professionally but comfortably, nice hair, little make-up, nothing pretentious, always wear your hair up, tied back or cut neatly and short. And I always get to an interview about an hour b4 hand to touch up my make-up, change my shoes (I usually catch public transport and wear my Reeboks in!), then that gives you time to go through all your questions, get a coffee and pee if you have to!
    Say to yourself - I will do better next time! and you will!
    Stay positive.


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