How to NOT interview for your RN/LPN job! - page 9

by musicianRN 61,746 Views | 112 Comments

I just got finished with round 3 of the most frustrating interviews! I was an LPN for 15 years before I went back to school for my RN. I am currently in training for management so I have been "forced" to endure the interview... Read More


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    I agree that one should look professional on a job interview and just basically in life. We are being judged all the time and it is not fair at all but it is what it is. makeup really and the one not mentioned is good credit score what that have to do with being a good employee I do not know. But since I have to dance to your tune like Tina Turner said" Im your private dancer and and since I need the money any old music will do"
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    The only tip I don't agree with is don't come in without makeup. Makeup is NOT a necessity in order to look polished and professional. Sometimes it's a plus, at certain times we all need it, but I hardly think it's required in order to prove yourself worthy of a responsible position in which you are required to look clean and tidy.
    mo2rn likes this.
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    Quote from ruby vee
    [color=#b22222]a couple of additions:

    don't bring your pets (gal came with an itty bitty dog in her purse) or children. seriously.
    don't chew gum . . . no matter how dry your mouth gets, chewing gum during an interview is just not professional.
    please don't start off the interview with a litany of things you won't do . . . such as work nights, touch poop or look at old people.



    lmao !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    silverbat likes this.
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    I actually disagree with many posters on here and agree with the manager regarding the makeup comment. Maybe my mother was old fashioned, and perhaps all my instructors throughout high school and college were as well, but I was always taught that a professional woman ALWAYS wears tasteful, minimal, looks like you don't have any on makeup. I'll always remember the military recruiter who came to my high school careers class who told us that even in the army women are taught how to apply tasteful makeup.
    This doesn't mean wear stage foundation, or the new colors from MAC and cherry red lips. It means a neutral foundation that matches your skin tone and evens it out, a very neutral eyeshadow, and maybe not even lip color but lip balm. Yes even if you have a "perfect" complexion a touch of makeup enhances it, makes you look put together and adds a finishing touch to your look. Interviews are first impressions. Dressing the part makes you look like you spent time this morning thinking about this interview, and that you care about the job. It has nothing to do with looking expensive, nor does it mean the manager is shallow in expecting you to come in looking professional.
    vintagemother likes this.
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    Quote from ruby vee
    [color=#b22222]a couple of additions:

    don't bring your pets (gal came with an itty bitty dog in her purse) or children. seriously.
    don't chew gum . . . no matter how dry your mouth gets, chewing gum during an interview is just not professional.
    please don't start off the interview with a litany of things you won't do . . . such as work nights, touch poop or look at old people.
    wow, has that really happened? actually, there is a woman in my nursing class that i can totally see saying those things...
  6. 2
    Quote from BD-RN
    I actually disagree with many posters on here and agree with the manager regarding the makeup comment. Maybe my mother was old fashioned, and perhaps all my instructors throughout high school and college were as well, but I was always taught that a professional woman ALWAYS wears tasteful, minimal, looks like you don't have any on makeup. I'll always remember the military recruiter who came to my high school careers class who told us that even in the army women are taught how to apply tasteful makeup.
    This doesn't mean wear stage foundation, or the new colors from MAC and cherry red lips. It means a neutral foundation that matches your skin tone and evens it out, a very neutral eyeshadow, and maybe not even lip color but lip balm. Yes even if you have a "perfect" complexion a touch of makeup enhances it, makes you look put together and adds a finishing touch to your look. Interviews are first impressions. Dressing the part makes you look like you spent time this morning thinking about this interview, and that you care about the job. It has nothing to do with looking expensive, nor does it mean the manager is shallow in expecting you to come in looking professional.
    I have never understood that... If it looks like you don't have any on, let's take the easy route and don't PUT any on.

    I wear make up every single day but I totally disagree that you have to wear makeup in order to look professional.
    toekneejo and mo2rn like this.
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    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    I have never understood that... If it looks like you don't have any on, let's take the easy route and don't PUT any on.

    I wear make up every single day but I totally disagree that you have to wear makeup in order to look professional.
    That's true...I mean, most men don't wear it and no one questions their professionalism for that reason.

    Makeup alone isn't going to make you look professional, nor will not wearing it suddenly make you the most unprofessional person out there. That's just one facet of many that make up a professional appearance.

    I agree with the majority here that a little subtle (key words: little and subtle) makeup can add some polish to your look and enhance your features so they notice them and not your makeup.

    But if you are lucky enough to look--or be able to look--polished without makeup and choose not to wear it, then more power to you!

    As for me...until they can come up with a guaranteed cure for rosacea, I'll still be frequenting Sephora.
    BabyRN2Be likes this.
  8. 0
    I want to know how are these weirdos scoring interviews? Surely your HR department is doing something wrong in the screening process if these people keep getting chosen... I know dozens of incredibly talented, accomplished, eager and professional new grads (fellow classmates) that no one has bothered to invite for an interview. What's up with that?

    Quality candidates don't need to be told not to wear pajamas to an interview. You should be thankful that these people you describe make it so obvious that they aren't qualified. Are these really the best candidates you can find, or are you just not screening your applicants?

    I have an interview later this week, and I hope to God my interviewer isn't like the author of this thread. You've been given incredible power that can shape a new nurse's destiny. Don't whine about the naive young nurses you interview on a public forum. It makes you look like the unprofessional one.
  9. 0
    Thank you for the information and advice. I'm RN of 6 years. I have been unsuccessful on some interviews and could not figure out why. I did dress professional however, I did not give examples and just gave simple answers like "i'm a team player" or "i'm a fast learner" etc. Also i did not show how willing i was to learn a new skill set, as you mentioned above. Thank you so much. I am going to approach interviews differently now.

    When i went on my very first interview for my first peds job as a new grad, HR did a group interview. One girl had on black stretch pants with brown uggs. I always wondered if she got the job back then.
  10. 1
    I agree with lrobinson5. I was with you up until the no makeup part. I personally hardly ever wear make up and it's because I look fine without it. I wear it occasionally if I am having photos taken (like the ones for pinning); but I usually go without. Like I said, I don't think I need a lot and it gets quite expensive. Then, some people have personal/religious beliefs against it.
    CrazierThanYou likes this.


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