How to NOT interview for your RN/LPN job! - page 10

by musicianRN

58,043 Views | 112 Comments

I just got finished with round 3 of the most frustrating interviews! I was an LPN for 15 years before I went back to school for my RN. I am currently in training for management so I have been "forced" to endure the interview... Read More


  1. 1
    Am a male nurse, I will be having an interview for an RN position in two days. After reading the post here, I guess I'll be wearing black pants with long sleeve shirt. I was going to wear scrub but not anymore. Thanks nurses wish me best of luck!!!
    not.done.yet likes this.
  2. 0
    Viva and others; thanks for sharing these tips.

    I truly found it hard to read/hard to believe many of those situations are actually happening. In today's job market especially - seriously get some advice from mom,dad or a trusted friend.

    Maybe the competition is not REALLY ALL THAT out there if these are literally the types who are showing up for interviews. *Damn, there I go being judgemental and all.

    And don't be aghast as those who are on the OTHER side of the desk in your interviews explain what makes them tick. They are who you need to convince; whether you think these tips are harsh or not...do you want a good job? Or are you just wasting yours and their time?
  3. 0
    Cstatic - your post stated you didn't think people were perhaps getting the information they need about 'appropriate' dressing for different circumstances.

    I think that although there may truly be exceptions as you mention; the majority of people do receive this sort of information - if not through family or friends, throughout their high school years, media...somewhere.

    I think most of the ones who don't follow the general guidelines on interviewing, dis it. They believe they are their own special lil flower. Nods, we are all.

    But, when you are competing for a job - the playing field is leveled in a myriad of ways. First impressions, being able to handle the interview aside from a reasonable amount of nervousness, dealing with the interviewers' personal or subjective opinions etc is part of what is measured along with your credentials.

    The other applicants being considered for this position at the same time as you most likely meet or exceed the credentials you have, or they wouldn't have made the cut either. You need to go 110% to be the one selected. These suggestions are ways for you to stand out in a positive way. Don't have to like it, and other posters in this thread aren't saying you do. They are trying to advise you that is how it works. It is what it is.
    Last edit by Autymn on May 10, '12
  4. 0
    Loved your last post Boston; helpful tips except for one.

    I say BS on the single mom criterion/slam, though I know there is absolutely no way to defend against it... aside from being hired and working your position in just as responsible a way as the childless nurses at your facility.

    I've seen plenty of childless/divorced or single adults call in for the flimsiest of excuses...flat tires, 'I totally forgot about my specialist doctor appointment and it takes three months to reschedule so I can't miss it', my calf is sore because I ran a half-marthon yesterday and didn't have the foresight to realize the date would be only one day before my next shift at my place of employment, blah blah blah.

    Plenty of single parents (dads and moms) responsibly plan for childcare and have plan B's -- will they sometimes get things fouled up at the last minute? Probably -- but watch closely and make sure you value the ones who do meet your expectations. They respect you and their teams/co-workers and try very hard to fill their obligations because they probably love and/or value their jobs very much.
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    The first interview is almost entirely based on the first impression. I'm going to put my best foot forward, covering tattoos, removing piercings, you name it. It's too important to not get right completely. The first impression makes or breaks you. I've only not been hired once-- a job in corrections. I'm 5'2", 110 lbs and I have boobs. I think I'm the definition of the last person they want working in jail (except criminals, of course).

    When I was doing the interviews in property management, I had a guy with narcolepsy apply for a grounds maintenance position. Bless his heart....fell asleep while filling out the app. Our grounds guys would sometimes do maintenance inside the apartments, so we ultimately decided not to hire him. Imagine coming home to find some guy asleep in your apartment.
  6. 0
    I believe that really we should just be well -groomed and ourselves in interviews .Research alot of questions that will be ask and practice on going to interviews etc. Learn to talk more with people and nurses, schools should help people with interviews so we know how to present ourselves in better ways.
  7. 1
    As I read all the comments on odd things worn, piercings, nails etc. I think back to nursing school and the FIRST DAY! We received a packet in the mail for my nursing program and first thing on top was the DRESS CODE. It stated, no nails, no fake nails, no long nails, they must be clean and with no polish. No piercings worn when attending lab or clinical. Hair up, nothing an unnatural color and they went on to detail the color, if it was other than being dyed a natural color or highlighted, it was not allowed. You could NOT be late or miss class, Ever! (of course it turned out later that some people did for hospitalization, lol!) Details about how to dress. There were so many rules, you wouldn't believe it. The letter stated that if you showed up with any of these things on the first day, you would be sent home. My first instinct was to balk at it and I didn't have any piercings or unnatural hair color etc. But our director came in and explained that they had a waiting list a mile long and that you weren't serious about this program, they would give your spot to someone that was. This was our introduction to how to be professional as a nurse and from here is was constantly reinforced. This was exactly from the dress code at the hospital where we did our clinicals. We had to do two community nursing experiences, we had to dress as we would for an interview and we were inspected and given criticism. we also had a class where we did practice interviews before a class and received criticism from the class, on our dress, our answers etc. I guess after that I find it difficult to believe that any school would leave someone totally unprepared to interview (that they would think pjs were ok), unless they just didn't pay attention.
    SHGR likes this.
  8. 0
    Both my LPN school and my RN school had basically the same info as anangelsmommy. The problem is, those who show up LATE and/or wearing the banned items, sporting piercings in every part of the face, have the dragon lady nails, etc don't seem to think the rules apply to them.

    Our school nursing program handbook specifically states ONLY ALL WHITE SHOES (no clogs, no open toes etc) and yet on the first day of clinical I noticed at least a dozen of the 40 people in class wearing black shoes, multicolored sneakers, and clogs/clog type shoes. Nothing was said...nothing was done. Yet I was 'called out' and accused of not wearing the authorized bottoms of the scrubs. I beg to differ...I most certainly DID purchase my top and bottom at the required uniform shop and they are the ones that the school mandated I purchase. My instructor didn't believe me b/c my top and bottom colors weren't exactly the same...nope...they are not (nor were several other classmates)..but not MY doing...its b/c the school chose the top from one line of the company's tops and the bottoms were not the 'match' to the top, both navy blue but two different hues of navy blue.
  9. 2
    Quote from CT Pixie
    Both my LPN school and my RN school had basically the same info as anangelsmommy. The problem is, those who show up LATE and/or wearing the banned items, sporting piercings in every part of the face, have the dragon lady nails, etc don't seem to think the rules apply to them.

    Our school nursing program handbook specifically states ONLY ALL WHITE SHOES (no clogs, no open toes etc) and yet on the first day of clinical I noticed at least a dozen of the 40 people in class wearing black shoes, multicolored sneakers, and clogs/clog type shoes. Nothing was said...nothing was done. Yet I was 'called out' and accused of not wearing the authorized bottoms of the scrubs. I beg to differ...I most certainly DID purchase my top and bottom at the required uniform shop and they are the ones that the school mandated I purchase. My instructor didn't believe me b/c my top and bottom colors weren't exactly the same...nope...they are not (nor were several other classmates)..but not MY doing...its b/c the school chose the top from one line of the company's tops and the bottoms were not the 'match' to the top, both navy blue but two different hues of navy blue.
    If your instructors were doing their job correctly, you would not know if any one else was corrected for their attire. Remediation and correction should be private.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN and SHGR like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    If your instructors were doing their job correctly, you would not know if any one else was corrected for their attire. Remediation and correction should be private.
    I was called out in front of my clinical group..out there in the open, nothing private about it. She corrected me in public for an offense that I had not made. However ,if she did privately remediate and correct Ms Dragon Lady nails, Ms. Rainbow color clogs, Mr Tat on the neck and Ms Tat on the arms, they obviously didn't take it seriously nor did the CI take it seriously b/c 5 weeks into the class they are STILL doing the same thing with breaking dress code and appearance rules.


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