stay or go back to the philippines - page 4

hey guys i need your opinion. Ok heres the deal. I was in nursing school last year. Unfortunately, i failed out of the program:crying2: Now im contemplating if i should go back to the Philippines to... Read More

  1. Visit  vegas2009} profile page
    1
    [quote=hushdawg;4194285]wow...

    are you aware, that us hospital networks are responsible for a majority of the hospitals being run in saudi arabia, dubai, oman and yemen? yes, i am. in fact, i'm also aware that the us military spend quite enough time in these places doing humanity and military work. both sides of my family have us air force and us navy backgrounds. so, don't lecture me about this stuff, i bet i know more than you do, ok?

    are you aware that most of the us-level experience that immigrant nurses gain before working in the usa is from the middle east? really? before working in the usa? it's possible. but, majority of us graduates would not even go and spend their time there. if they had to, they'll spend 'gaining experience' in a real third world country. so, when it comes to hiring, do you really think that someone who has gained 'experience' in the middle east is more hirable than someone who gained his/her experience in south america or africa? what's so special about the middle east that it trumps the 'experience' over any other country?

    are you also aware that iran is not the backward, third world country full of idiots that the media wants you to think it is? what the ??? i never said that it was a third world country. in fact, you are the one who just said it is. whether you acknowledge it or not, there is a backslash against iran right now. i did not make the rules, but this is reality for most people in united states. the sooner you acknowledge that, the better you are off. you are living in united states, the culture has changed in the 21st century. most people are paranoid, not idiots.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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  3. Visit  vegas2009} profile page
    0
    [quote=hushdawg;4194285]wow... i cannot believe that was actually posted.

    are you also aware that iran is not the backward, third world country full of idiots that the media wants you to think it is?

    ok, maybe you didn't say that it is... oops, but you brought it up. by the way, i don't believe in everything the media spits out. i'm not one of "those" people.
  4. Visit  chrispynurse} profile page
    1
    Im in the middle of exam week thus far plus i havent gone through most of the comments just because i assume it'll just be this whole ego trip thing that goes on in these forums and I dont even know if the original poster is even interested, but whatever. For the record I am a US (fil-am) nursing student here in the PI getting through the years to just graduate with my BSN after having had some conflicts with nursing school in the States, mind you I never failed my classes. I just wanted to share a few tidbits about my experience, like you I dont like the extra hassle that comes with transferring so my parents and I did our research before anything. My comments are in bold.



    Quote from black_knight


    Study in the Philippines

    Pros:
    - Cheap tuitionthere's that
    - Plus you're gonna get a BSNbig plus
    - no need to apply to different schools and worry if you'll get accepted or not. You can just pick the school you want and as long as you have the money to pay for the tuition, you'll get in. (i know some schools like UP etc etc.. that have very high standards and really look at the grades of the students but for the most part.. most schools in the Philippines, its all about the money. They'll let you in. If you're not fit to be a nurse, they'll fail you. Win win situation for the school. They get your money and their reputation as a school won't be tarnished. Am i right?)oh only if only, only select schools will accept transferees regardless of your income bracket, schools such as Trinity, UP, UST, La Salle and other "high class schools" want everyone to start from zero regardless. if money was the issue I would have gotten into those but unfortunately organization and image over money for these schools
    - nursing classes are not as overwhelming? because i heard students start taking nursing classes in their freshman year which means more time to digest the informationdont really know, i was a transferee, but for as much as I know, the students spend the first two years working on minor subjects before actual nursing courses
    - Girls jk heheno comment

    Cons:
    - have to start out as a freshman even though i already took alot of classes in the states I go to Our Lady of Fatima University and I transferred over last year with the help of my advisor she was able to credit all my college credits from my old university and thus cut my time to a year and a half...like hell I was going to throw 3 years of my life down the drain
    - alot of things can change in 4-5 year span with nclex, requirements in the states, etc etcrequirements can and will change but the fact of the matter remains, as a nurse you'll need to still know how to care for patients, not kill anybody and still know your stuff
    - have to leave my family back in the States MAJOR CON, the other foreigners in my school usually complain about this
    - hot and humid weather in the Philippinesduring the early months the later months are really wet though, always bring and umbrella, they're used for every kind of weather
    - less qualified CIshmm...what do you mean?
    - hospitals are not as advanced technologically maybe not if your school doesnt have a technologically-advanced affiliation, but then its at these "less advanced" hospitals where skills are tested, resourcefulness is developed, and appreciation for what we do have in the States, bloodm
    - i heard getting clinical experience is also hard (but then again i also heard that you get to do more things freely in the Philippines without worrying about the repercussions of your actions.. which is good for the students not so much for the patients haha. You'll learn alot as a student.)how so?
    - i have to take the NLE and it will take 6 months before i can get my license which means its not just 4 years but rather 4 yrs and 6 months.. maybe even longeras a US citizen with my student visa ( major requirement) even if you were to convert to dual, I dont have to take the NLE, I do have to get my credentials reviewed by the CGFNS upon returning to the States though...actually I cant take the NLE because Im not a Philippine citizen, depends on your state. California requires the NLE while Texas doesnt (one of the graduating foreigners just sent in his application and flying back in May after their "mass feeding" community project after graduation
    - forever a foreign grad.. which means harder time transferring credits to school or getting a license from different statesforeign grad or not, after getting that license nothing else matters...FYI your license will say "_______, RN" not "________, RN after 4years from the PI who transferred after failing out of a nursing program in the US....."
    black_knight likes this.
  5. Visit  Hushdawg} profile page
    0
    Quote from chrispynurse
    - i have to take the NLE and it will take 6 months before i can get my license which means its not just 4 years but rather 4 yrs and 6 months.. maybe even longeras a US citizen with my student visa ( major requirement) even if you were to convert to dual, I dont have to take the NLE, I do have to get my credentials reviewed by the CGFNS upon returning to the States though...actually I cant take the NLE because Im not a Philippine citizen, depends on your state. California requires the NLE while Texas doesnt (one of the graduating foreigners just sent in his application and flying back in May after their "mass feeding" community project after graduation
    Did he miss the part about Texas requiring a Credential Evaluation?

    Part of the Credential Evaluation is the requirement of an active local license.
  6. Visit  black_knight} profile page
    0
    ok. You guys have a point about the advantages/disadvantages of being a US grad and foreign grad. But wow, graduating with a 50k debt is such a turn off. I inquired to some universities in my area about the cost of their tuition fees and most of them will cost approx 22k per year since theyre private schools. On the other hand, If I go the ADN route again, I don't think my chances of getting in is good since I lived out of district. The community college that I went to(the one that is in my district), i have zero chance of being readmitted since they prioritize students who failed this year over the students who failed last year.
  7. Visit  black_knight} profile page
    0
    Quote from chrispynurse
    I go to Our Lady of Fatima University and I transferred over last year with the help of my advisor she was able to credit all my college credits from my old university and thus cut my time to a year and a half...like hell I was going to throw 3 years of my life down the drain
    I have a cousin who goes to Fatima University. I think she's graduating this year. Btw, it's good that you were able to transfer your college credits. My brother already talked to the Dean of Trinity University and he said that even though they will credit my classes there, I still have to start over as a freshman. I think theres a new law that was recently implemented that students have to start as a freshman if they transfer schools (i dunno)

    anyway I havent decided if im staying or going back to the Philippines. I am still currently exploring all my options here in the States. Plus Im enjoying my job as a PCT I don't wanna resign yet hehe
  8. Visit  janeritchie01} profile page
    0
    Just that high class Universities in Manila wont accept any students came from other school for subject credit, but they want you to start all over again.
  9. Visit  Hushdawg} profile page
    0
    Quote from janeritchie01
    Just that high class Universities in Manila wont accept any students came from other school for subject credit, but they want you to start all over again.
    Not entirely true.

    Sto Thomas recently admitted a nursing student who transferred from the USA and several of her courses were credited. It depends on the transcript the school provides and if the school/student can prove to Sto Tomas that the courses were up to standard. Pretty much the same way that a foreign educated nurse has to prove that his/her education is up to USA standard during the licensure process.
  10. Visit  wishiwereanurse} profile page
    0
    "Cons:
    - have to start out as a freshman even though i already took alot of classes in the states
    - alot of things can change in 4-5 year span with nclex, requirements in the states, etc etc
    - have to leave my family back in the States "


    I just find it interesting someone said leaving the family is like a major con to them...but to most kids that grew up in america it's like a major pro for them to leave home... I remembered when I was freshman I didn't know a single soul except for the guidance counselor...but first day of classes I made friends with 50 people immediately...majority of them cheered me up when I was homesick...sometimes when I think about it..if I went to school in Cali I probably would've gone nuts before I can finish an RN program...there's just something different..maybe for me it was the hot, humid weather and the people that saved me from the insanities of becoming a nurse...

    "- forever a foreign grad.. which means harder time transferring credits to school or getting a license from different states foreign grad or not, after getting that license nothing else matters...FYI your license will say "_______, RN" not "________, RN after 4years from the PI who transferred after failing out of a nursing program in the US....."


    chrispyRN has some sense..I mean I guess it depends on what your plans are after you get your license...being a foreign grad may or may not affect you. Like me, I am a foreign grad, but I am now an RN. I don't think of moving to different states to live and work because I grew up in cali, I love it here, and this is where my family is...bad economy or not I will be staying here... and with what I make as a nurse I can just go and visit other states...so as of now I am not thinking of getting licenses from other states... A big question mark though as to whether or not I can qualify for graduate school...but I am not even thinking of graduate school now because my focus is still on building up my experience...
  11. Visit  black_knight} profile page
    0
    Quote from Hushdawg
    Not entirely true.

    Sto Thomas recently admitted a nursing student who transferred from the USA and several of her courses were credited. It depends on the transcript the school provides and if the school/student can prove to Sto Tomas that the courses were up to standard. Pretty much the same way that a foreign educated nurse has to prove that his/her education is up to USA standard during the licensure process.
    What year was this? I wonder if UST still accepts transferees

    Quote from wishiwereanurse
    "Cons:
    - have to start out as a freshman even though i already took alot of classes in the states
    - alot of things can change in 4-5 year span with nclex, requirements in the states, etc etc
    - have to leave my family back in the States "


    I just find it interesting someone said leaving the family is like a major con to them...but to most kids that grew up in america it's like a major pro for them to leave home... I remembered when I was freshman I didn't know a single soul except for the guidance counselor...but first day of classes I made friends with 50 people immediately...majority of them cheered me up when I was homesick...sometimes when I think about it..if I went to school in Cali I probably would've gone nuts before I can finish an RN program...there's just something different..maybe for me it was the hot, humid weather and the people that saved me from the insanities of becoming a nurse...
    Thats because I was born and raised in the Philippines

    "- forever a foreign grad.. which means harder time transferring credits to school or getting a license from different states foreign grad or not, after getting that license nothing else matters...FYI your license will say "_______, RN" not "________, RN after 4years from the PI who transferred after failing out of a nursing program in the US....."


    chrispyRN has some sense..I mean I guess it depends on what your plans are after you get your license...being a foreign grad may or may not affect you. Like me, I am a foreign grad, but I am now an RN. I don't think of moving to different states to live and work because I grew up in cali, I love it here, and this is where my family is...bad economy or not I will be staying here... and with what I make as a nurse I can just go and visit other states...so as of now I am not thinking of getting licenses from other states... A big question mark though as to whether or not I can qualify for graduate school...but I am not even thinking of graduate school now because my focus is still on building up my experience...
    good point. However, Im more worried about two nurses competing for one position and they both have the same qualifications, experiences, and the only difference is one is a US grad and the other is a foreign grad. Im afraid the US grad will get the nod.

    btw so you grew up in Cali? what made you decide to study in another country?
  12. Visit  momnars18} profile page
    0
    Quote from black_knight

    i think you misunderstood my post. my fault i should have been more clear. when i said students can do things more freely in the philippines without worrying about the consequences of their actions, i meant cis let their students do things more freely(such as inserting catheters into pt, doing iv push, etc etc. in my school, i didnt even get to experience inserting a catheter into patient. we only did it on a mannequin.) and if they mess up, the cis got their backs. it gives students a sense of insurance that its ok to explore and its ok if you make a mistake.

    thanks.
    wow which nursing school did you go to? in my school, we were able to start ivs, insert ng tubes, foleys, ims, sub-qs and a whole lot more on actual patients. i remember even putting an iv in the er with a cp patient who was shocky..if i were you, i would stay and go to school here in the us. if you are going to work here anyways, might as well get trained here so you'll get accustomed to not only the advanced medical equipment but the culture in the nursing units and taking care of diverse patient populations. and at this tough job market, foreign new grads will have a tougher time landing a new grad position. if you're worried about paying your debt, 1-2 years of working as an rn here will take care of that as long as you put aside school loans in your budget once you start working. i too am a green card holder, graduated with a bsn in one of the cal states here, passed nclex at 75 qs on the first try and studying here was one of the best decisions that i made. good luck on your decision!
  13. Visit  momnars18} profile page
    0
    "A big question mark though as to whether or not I can qualify for graduate school"

    If you are a foreign grad with a BSN, you will have to take a research class here in the states if you want to pursue grad school. I know this because one of my classmates in my nursing research class was a BSN philippine grad and he had to take nursing research here to pursue grad school.


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