Why do so many nurses from the Philippines come to Canada/USA? - page 10

by lilaclover | 29,556 Views | 128 Comments

I hope nobody takes offense to this question because I certainly don't mean it in any negative way. I am just wondering why so many nurses from the Philippines are coming to Canada and the USA? I always thought the... Read More


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    well based from the previous post, way back in page 1 and 2, I don't see any reason why there are so many Canadians who are jobless. I tried to look for a nursing job in the internet specifically in Canada and there are lots of hiring there, for Ontario I think there are 100+ nursing jobs open in just 1 website, how much more in others. Try to look for possibilities, advise your fellow Canadians to search and search for a job because in your country there are lot's of possibilities, not unless they are not highly qualified to land that job. That is where we Filipinos' are known of, try and try until you die( naah..just joking) try and try until you succeed, and also ("Kung ayaw may dahilan...kung gusto maraming paraan ")- If you do not want to do it, you always have reason for not doing it. If you want to do it, you can always find ways to do it.
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    Quote from juan de la cruz
    What's there to get? I could have phrased your sentence as: why would the profit-conscious call center industry waste money on training people from Timbuktu to speak English so that they can work for peanuts in overseas call centers when the dirt cheap alternative in the world are the people from the Philippines whose English is not stellar but "good enough" to get by for a very small fraction of the cost compared to employing native English speakers in their own homelands where the call center services are utilized.
    It's seems like you don't get it. What I'm trying to point out is that among those non-native English speakers or those who do not speak English as their first language, Filipinos are among the best. That's basically all that I'm trying to say and I'm using the "call center boom" as an example. There's no need to compare a non-native speaker to a native speaker of the language. The later would flatout beat the non-native dude 99% of the time.
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    Quote from juan de la cruz
    Huh? where did you get the idea that nurses in "America" worry if their patient can pay or not?
    1.Reports of uninsured Americans not receiving medical care.

    2.USA as the only wealthy, industrialized nation that does not ensure that all citizens have health coverage
    -stated by Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science

    3.United States being ranked 37th in the world in health care systems by WHO and one of the lowest rank among developed nations.

    Can't really argue on this since I've never been to America but maybe you guys are on the better end of the spectrum.
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    Quote from lactamase
    1.Reports of uninsured Americans not receiving medical care.

    2.USA as the only wealthy, industrialized nation that does not ensure that all citizens have health coverage
    -stated by Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science

    3.United States being ranked 37th in the world in health care systems by WHO and one of the lowest rank among developed nations.

    Can't really argue on this since I've never been to America but maybe you guys are on the better end of the spectrum.
    Well, then I was right in thinking that you just didn't get your message across well. To state that nurses here worry about whether their patients can pay for medical care or not is just plain, flat out, absolutely, without reasonable doubt, false. Elkpark already answered that quite succintly.

    Regarding the statements in your last post, well, those are very true and I can explain them further if you want.

    Statement 1 and 2: There are uninsured Americans not receiving medical care. USA is the only wealthy, industrialized nation that does not ensure that all citizens have health coverage.

    As it stands at the moment (with Obama's new health care law taken out of the equation), there are three ways an American can receive health care insurance coverage: 1) Government funded insurance through Medicare (for those 65 and above only) and through state funded Medicaid programs. Medicaid programs are very restrictive -- only those with extreme poverty (low income, limited financial resources) qualify and state to state rules vary on their criteria for eligibility. 2) Veteren's Affairs funded which only applies to Americans who served in the military 3) Private insurers such as HMO's, PPO's, Blue Cross, and such. For the most part, Americans who fall under the third category have insurance through employment-sponsored programs as part of their work benefits.

    Sounds peachy enough doesn't it? Find your own category among the above 3 and we can all gather 'round for a healthy kumbaya. Not really, there are Americans who at one point or another in their lives, will not fall into any of the above 3 categories. Take for example, a middle-aged healthy man (not 65 yet, so not eligible for Medicare), who loses his job at the automotive manufacturing plant because the job was shipped overseas, will lose his employement sponsored health insurance. He will not qualify for Medicaid because he still has the house he mortgaged when he had the job because this house is an asset, so he's not considered down and out, though really, he is screwed. In short, God forbid that something changes in this man's health because now, he has nothing to cover him when he is sick.

    Again, that's just one example. There are numerous other scenarios of peope who are uninsured in the US: the undocumented alien (that's an easy one), the self-employed who doesn't make enough income to purchase individual private insurance because of its high cost, and those who work for companies that do not provide insurance to its employees, the list goes on. By law, hospitals are not to turn away a patient who shows up at the ER with no health insurance. This is one of the reasons why ER's across the US are full of people seeking care not only for true emergency situations but also for things that you would normally just see the physician in the clinic for. It doesn't matter if you have insurance or not, the ER will take you in and will just send you a bill later if you have no health insurance to cover part of the cost of the service you received.

    Some Americans, in my opinion, are proud self-sufficient people who view government dole-out as a sign of personal failure. Some who become uninsured, will refuse to seek medical care for little ailments and minor discomforts and will "man-up" and do nothing not realizing that a mild or minor health care situation can get worse. On the other hand, there are also some people who do not see the shame in receiving government assistance and will do whatever is required to get Medicaid coverage. I'm not in a position to judge people's choices, I'm just giving scenarios. Illegal aliens do show up in the ER's across the US when they are sick. Hospitals are not law-enforcement agencies, thus, are not bound to report the legal status of patients to authorities.

    Statement Number 3: United States being ranked 37th in the world in health care systems by WHO and one of the lowest rank among developed nations.

    This is largely due to the facts in statement numbers 1 and 2. Developed nations in Europe as well as Canada, Australia, and New Zealand have a form of national health care coverage available for all their citizens. However, the quality of health care delivered in hospitals in the US is one of the most technologically advanced and is comparable to the industrialized countries with national health care coverage. The difference lies in who gets access to this technologically-advanced care. The insured definitely gets a piece of the pie but so do others who for lack of a good word, also take advantage of it. Like the example I made in another post about the undocumented alien who is being considered for an organ transplant. Though undocumented, this person showed up at the hospital's door in fulminant single-organ failure. It is unethical to kick this person to the curb to die... and what will the headlines on the evening news bear if a hospital is found to have done that? But is it fair to use limited hospital resources to pay for this person's care? or worse, should taxpayer money be used for this person's care? You don't have to answer that question, I have my answer but I prefer to discuss it on another thread.
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    Quote from lactamase
    It's seems like you don't get it. What I'm trying to point out is that among those non-native English speakers or those who do not speak English as their first language, Filipinos are among the best. That's basically all that I'm trying to say and I'm using the "call center boom" as an example. There's no need to compare a non-native speaker to a native speaker of the language. The later would flatout beat the non-native dude 99% of the time.
    Oh alright, it's me.
    nursel56, Fiona59, and elkpark like this.
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    The thing is nurses in the Philippines are not compensated properly. If you compare the salary of a nurse in Canada or the US to the salary of a nurse in the Philippines, you would be surprise how a nurse in the Philippines can allocate their salary for the expenses in a month.
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    Quote from lactamase
    How different are American nurses compared to UK nurses when it comes to practicing nursing? Can you give a realistic example. Apply it in a scenario or something like that. They say that nurses from countries like UK don't have to worry if their patient can pay or not unlike in America. Well I do think that's a factor.
    Your point would be that what type of payment situation a patient might be in is something that a) nurses know about and b) would account for some type of hypothetical difference between our performance and nurses from countries with nationalized health insurance? That's offensive.

    There is no reason why a nurse would need to know that, and if she did know it we are bound to treat all patients admitted to our care the same without regard to their financial status.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Apr 10, '11
    Fiona59 and juan de la cruz like this.
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    Quote from lactamase
    What I'm trying to point out is that among those non-native English speakers or those who do not speak English as their first language, Filipinos are among the best.
    My opinion still stands that this statement is completely false. Why? because...

    1. I read the posts from people who are posting in the Philippines on allnurses including yours.
    2. I work with immigrant Filipino nurses in the US as well as people from other national origins so I have a point of comparison.
    3. I am originally from the Philippines myself and my English made a complete 360 degree turn for the better from the 16 years I've spent in the US. Some Filipinos who have been here longer hasn't gotten any better, I'm afraid.

    ...and lastly, just for kicks and giggles, 4. watch the last Miss Universe show (your contestant totally bombed the interview portion).

    You don't have to agree with me.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    Quote from lactamase
    1.Reports of uninsured Americans not receiving medical care.
    How would that affect our nursing care or be a basis for comparing the training we get compared to other countries?

    2.USA as the only wealthy, industrialized nation that does not ensure that all citizens have health coverage
    -stated by Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science
    Juan explained this well, but again -- it has nothing to do with your statement that our nursing care would be affected by that.

    3.United States being ranked 37th in the world in health care systems by WHO and one of the lowest rank among developed nations.
    Normally this refers to access and cost of the healthcare system, not the care one receives as a patient once in the system. If you only look at that I believe you will find that many people from countries with nationalized single payer healthcare plans will come to the US for treatment at great cost and upheaval in their lives.

    Can't really argue on this since I've never been to America but maybe you guys are on the better end of the spectrum.
    I really have to ask, why you are taking the time to justify an opinion when you already know you don't have nearly enough facts at hand to offer a meaningful reply.
    juan de la cruz and Fiona59 like this.
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    Quote from nursel56
    Your point would be that what type of payment situation a patient might be in is something that a) nurses know about and b) would account for some type of hypothetical difference between our performance and nurses from countries with nationalized health insurance
    You consume resources when giving care to a patient right? Unless you don't, it matters when giving care to a patient. As much as I would love but I can't give free medications to a patient who can't pay and is not insured. Don't think of me as a cold-hearted nurse but thats reality in PH. Some people can't get treated because they can't pay. Some don't even consider getting a surgery because it cost a lot.


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