Who's to blame for having oversupply of nurses here???...

  1. 2 1. Ourselves
    2. Relatives
    3. Government
    4. Schools
    5. Media (T.V., Advertisements on Broadsheets)

    I choose myself, why??? for believing on news on T.V.that there is a huge shortage of nurses and easily get carried by the vast amount of advertisements saying I'll have a great opportunity coming to U.S.. Assuming that graduating only as a BSN and passing the NLE and NCLEX is enough. I am also blaming myself for listening to C.I.s and lecturers and those in review centers with their sweet words which just gives us false hope. You... what is your story... do you blame yourself?
    This is the reality i am facing now... If only... lot's of it...
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    Visit  pablo75 profile page

    About pablo75

    Joined Apr '08; Posts: 6; Likes: 4.

    58 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  khirbz profile page
    0
    Me, I don't blame myself as it was true when I started my nursing course way back in 2001. There were really a shortage of nurses in the US and wasn't a thought of retrogression. In this waiting game you really should have patience. So when I graduated last 2005 I took all the exams and then went to an agency where they filed a petition for me. Now all I have to do is wait and make the most of the time waiting. While waiting we can give the best care to our countrymen. While gearing for a greater challenge abroad let's exhaust our expertise and care first here before going abroad. It's how we approach the situation. Me, I don't blame anyone. I just go about with my work as a nurse and wait for the retrogression to be over and finally get my visa.
  4. Visit  jenna18 profile page
    0
    I got interested in your thread. same here... at least we're accountable for our own mistakes and actions... Well its not a big lie after all. the shortage is true, but as you know, law of supply and demand, supply of visas not enough for all the applicants, bulk carried on to the succeeding year= retrogression. I guess before it was really easy...that's why the news spread.. Well, this is not the time for regrets or doubts... we need prayers, for God to lead us to right path. Right now, I don't want to be a burden for my parents anymore, I want to work, of course to help pay for our debts (which was also a result of my expensive tuition fee).
  5. Visit  suzanne4 profile page
    4
    Sorry, but one cannot count on another country for always having a need. This is something that you government is trying to push but is not acceptable behavior for the US or any other country.

    They have approved the LPN training there, but do not accept it for licensure, but expect the US just to take these grads and what they fail to understand is that the US does not have a shortage of LPNs, and therefore no visas are issued for this training. And then we see schools bragging about sending LPNs to the US with the H2-B visa, and we are seeing them being deported now for immigration fraud as the nurse cannot this visa to enter the US legally. It was meant for unskilled laborers for a short period of time only.

    And then you have RN programs where not one student has been able to pass the NLE.

    And then there are the two year ADN programs which are not recognized for licensure in your country, so they are not accepted by immigration here for visas. The requirement here is that the training be considered first level professional in your country, and it is not accepted there for the nurse to even be able to write the NLE, so why should we accept it or anyone else?
    Almost every other country also requires the BSN as well for immigration purposes.

    It really comes down to all of the above items that were listed and for those that have gone into nursing recently in the second courser programs or are just starting because they think that it will be a fast ticket out, need to reexamine what their motives are as well.

    We have just seen a class of nurses graduate from there with 850 in the class and primarily made up of physicians and dentists. What do you think is going to be the chance of them all getting out of there in any reasonable amount of time? The government cannot lose that many, and then thereis the issue of finding someone to hire them as well.

    All should always be spending time thoroughly researching every single thing about training as well as be aware of all of the obstacles that can be in the way and have a plan B in place.
  6. Visit  jenna18 profile page
    0
    Its quite easy for you to say that khirbs because you graduated earlier... unlike for most of us... where every door of opportunity closed... hard to find local jobs and difficult to gain entry into another country. Well, that's good for you. Wish you luck
  7. Visit  Serene_ieg profile page
    0
    LAWRENCE 01: AS YOU REQUESTED I COPIED AND PASTED BELOW, IN FULL THE ARTICLE THAT I READ.

    http://www.gov.ph/news/?i=18444
    Gov.Ph News Browse the Archives

    Ladderized education in universities and colleges 'abolishes' school dropouts
    TUESDAY, JULY 31, 2007 | EDUCATION

    Secretary Augusto Syjuco, director-general of the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), discussed the merits of ladderized education program this morning with Malacaang reporters during the launching of TESDA's Language Skills Institute in Taguig City.

    President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo has "hit on a wonderful formula with ladderized education," said Syjuco as he explained to mediamen how the scheme works.

    The TESDA head said ladderized education is like a stairway, with each step a stepping stone towards the next higher level, like caregivers who graduate to nursing aides, and could then go on to college and take up Nursing, with all their previous TESDA courses credited by the college or university that they will be attending.

    On the other hand, he said that the traditional four-year course "is like a pipe -- if you do not finish your course in four years, you are considered a dropout..."

    He revealed that TESDA's ladderized curriculum has a 98-percent awareness rating; and already has 73-percent acceptance by the targeted population.

    Syjuco also explained that the ladderized curriculum only requires that enrollees be high school graduates, while the PGMA "Training for Work" scholarship accepts any applicant regardless of educational attainment.

    The ladderization of all academic courses was mandated by Executive Order 358 as early as three years ago, revealed Syjuco, who noted that CHED commissioners had divided the number of universities and colleges among themselves at 21 schools per commissioner; and that one commissioner had completed ladderizing his/her 21 assigned schools of higher learning. (OPS)
  8. Visit  gemini_star profile page
    0
    Quote from pablo75
    1. Ourselves
    2. Relatives
    3. Government
    4. Schools
    5. Media (T.V., Advertisements on Broadsheets)

    I choose myself, why??? for believing on news on T.V.that there is a huge shortage of nurses and easily get carried by the vast amount of advertisements saying I'll have a great opportunity coming to U.S.. Assuming that graduating only as a BSN and passing the NLE and NCLEX is enough. I am also blaming myself for listening to C.I.s and lecturers and those in review centers with their sweet words which just gives us false hope. You... what is your story... do you blame yourself?
    This is the reality i am facing now... If only... lot's of it...
    That is very honest of you to post that. I hope others will also realize that nursing is not an easy ticket to land in the US. It's sad that many are still pursuing nursing taking that route. Don't blame yourself for it, just do something out of it. :redpinkhe
  9. Visit  lawrence01 profile page
    3
    Quote from whisky
    LAWRENCE 01: AS YOU REQUESTED I COPIED AND PASTED BELOW, IN FULL THE ARTICLE THAT I READ.

    http://www.gov.ph/news/?i=18444
    Gov.Ph News Browse the Archives

    Ladderized education in universities and colleges 'abolishes' school dropouts
    TUESDAY, JULY 31, 2007 | EDUCATION

    Secretary Augusto Syjuco, director-general of the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), discussed the merits of ladderized education program this morning with Malacaang reporters during the launching of TESDA’s Language Skills Institute in Taguig City.

    President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo has “hit on a wonderful formula with ladderized education,” said Syjuco as he explained to mediamen how the scheme works.

    The TESDA head said ladderized education is like a stairway, with each step a stepping stone towards the next higher level, like caregivers who graduate to nursing aides, and could then go on to college and take up Nursing, with all their previous TESDA courses credited by the college or university that they will be attending.

    On the other hand, he said that the traditional four-year course “is like a pipe -- if you do not finish your course in four years, you are considered a dropout…”

    He revealed that TESDA’s ladderized curriculum has a 98-percent awareness rating; and already has 73-percent acceptance by the targeted population.

    Syjuco also explained that the ladderized curriculum only requires that enrollees be high school graduates, while the PGMA “Training for Work” scholarship accepts any applicant regardless of educational attainment.

    The ladderization of all academic courses was mandated by Executive Order 358 as early as three years ago, revealed Syjuco, who noted that CHED commissioners had divided the number of universities and colleges among themselves at 21 schools per commissioner; and that one commissioner had completed ladderizing his/her 21 assigned schools of higher learning. (OPS)
    Now, I'll give my opinion on it. First of all, there is nothing wrong with the ladderized program itself. It is what it is.

    The problem is, practical nurses, caregivers, nursing aides are not recognized by the PNA and the BON. As far as hospital jobs are concern, there are technically no official designation as being an LPN, caregiver or a nursing aide in PH and their won't be anytime soon as long as the PNA and the BON doesn't recognize it. There is also no need for it.

    There are a deluge of students who graduate with BSN degrees. The better known hospitals will only hire those with BSNs and they don't even hire all that they actually need. What ever hospitals say, there is no shortage of nurses in PH. The truth is they can only afford a few nurses to Staff the floors - just enough to barely run the diff. stations.

    If hospitals can't afford to give a decent nurse-to-patient ratio why would they hire additional staff to assist the nurse? Business-wise, and common sense dictates that they should just concentrate on hiring nurses and let them do everything, w/c they have been doing all along for decades and hospitals from PH are used w/o LPNs. If nurses are already paid very low wages then how much does LPNs, caregivers and nursing aides could be getting ?? Not enough for themselves.

    So, what use does a ladderized program do for them if they can't get a decent job on being an LPN, caregiver or nursing aide or whatever they call them in the country. That's the reason why it is supposed to be on a laderrized scheme, so that they can work in-between courses but since there is actually no job for those in-between courses then why do a ladderized scheme?? Also, not all schools credits subjects from these LPN programs. Some mushroom nursing schools may and, in my opinion, this is the real reason for these so-called ladderized programs. A TESDA accredited LPN school/review center/recruitment center/agency/immigration consultation/man power resources will have ties with other nursing schools/IT school/Hotel and Rest. Mgmt. school to accept their programs. They feed each other. Try and apply to a traditional nursing school and best bet is they won't credit anything from the LPN program. Why would they? There are lots of applicants for their BSN programs.
    jenna18, Daly City RN, and suzanne4 like this.
  10. Visit  suzanne4 profile page
    0
    And this just proves my point once again, that your administation does not have a clue as to what is happening in the real world. From Brion coming out with that statement last year that those that do not pass the NLE should automatically be declared the LPN and be able to go overseas to work, but alas, it does not work that way and no one from any other country has ever accepted it. To everything else that is being done there with no regard to the student nor the patient.

    With close to 1 million in nursing schools now, how can they say that there is a shortage of nurses there? Perhaps with those that have actually passed the NLE due to poor training, or those that do not wish to write it but get hired someplace right away that is not going to happen.
  11. Visit  Daly City RN profile page
    2
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    This leaves a vexing question: How safe is nursing in the Philippines? Very unsafe I believe. I don't blame the individual front line professional RN's in the Philippines but I blame the system and the people in higher positions in the Philippine government and in the private hospitals for allowing the very poor nurse-to-patient ratio. This leaves many nurses unable to find local jobs. If the concerned authorities improve the ratio, then more nurses can be hired by the hospitals and there will be less unemployed Filipino nurses.

    Local residents, returning Filipino balikbayans and foreigners who are unlucky enough to be admitted in Philippine hospitals with poor nurse staffing are put in greater danger. This is something to consider for Filipinos residing abroad who wish to retire in the Philippines. I have been a nurse here in California for the last 27 years and as any experienced nurse would know that poor staffing leads to more errors being committed by nurses. Statistically, in the U.S. about 100,000 patients die from medical errors committed in U.S. hospitals. In California, we have a 1 nurse to 5 patients ratio in Med-Surg. acute care hospitals, therefore I believe hospitals are safer here in California. In the Philippines, I've heard of horror stories about nurses taking care of 40, 50 and even 60 patients per nurse! I pity my fellow nurses in the home country.

    I am closely involved about monitoring and auditing the nurses in our acute care hospital here in the SF Bay Area and I am very much aware about the errors that were committed specifically in our unit. Thanks to the private grants we received and also the efforts from all the nurses in our hospital, we have vastly improved the safety of nursing care in our hospital. This accomplishment is something to be proud about. Undoubtedly, the patients are the prime beneficiary of this accomplishment.

    If Philippine hospitals hire more nurses, then they will not only reduce the oversupply of nurses in the Philippines but they will also make their patient delivery care much safer. It's a win-win situation.

    I know, I'm talking as a "First World" RN but the Philippines is a "Third World" country. How can you improve the situations in the Philippine health care system if no one really makes a heroic effort to make things better? Hire more Filipino nurses is a good start.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
    jenna18 and suzanne4 like this.
  12. Visit  narutoidol profile page
    0
    blaming your self!!!!! U.S is not the only option, and i guess our super moderator doesnt want us to go U.S , not unless you very much more qualified.She is perfectly right!
    If we blame our leaders,Teachers and Others,i n the end of the day,what do you think we will accomplish for blaming them.
    i am a dec2005 passer,got marrieddec 2006 and right now i am still starting my life as R.N,i worked as a volunter in the government hospital here only last month.
    i dont blame myself.U.S is having a retro right now and maybe recession. sO,next option New zeland.if you really want to achieve your all american dream,you must have patience. For me, what i need is one year hosp.exp,and ielts exam for N.Z.third option. n case i guess dubai, and qatar.
    Right now,work,work and work.
    By the way,i passed all my exams FOR U.S( CGFNS,NCLEX AND IELTS) last year.it means my family invested alot for the all american dream.In the end of day,we just pray.
  13. Visit  suzanne4 profile page
    3
    I want nurses to be able to get jobs as nurses, not as caregivers or maids. And with the significant increase in students enrolled in nursing programs there now, the quality has gone down and will go down even more. There are not enough qualified instructors available either, so they are employing new grads in that role both as clinical instructor as well as clinical lecturers. And this is a fact as I get resumes all of the time sent to me asking for help in the person getting a job.

    They may be teaching there but do not meet the qualifications to teach here in the US, nor have any bedside experience.

    If someone wishes to come to the US, and knowing that there is a retrogression in place, then they need to go to another country and get adequate experience, otherwise 5 years and no experience, and it is going to be quite difficult to get a job anywhere.

    If one goes into nursing now, they need to be aware that they cannot just get on a plane and fly someplace and expect to be able to get a job and begin working. That no longer is the case anywhere. And every other country requires a local license as a start.

    I want nurses to be qualified when they come here and have the skills that are taken for granted that all BSNs should have.
    griffon, gemini_star, and Daly City RN like this.
  14. Visit  Daly City RN profile page
    6
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>

    To narutoidol:

    If you don't blame the current problems to the people who have the authority to improve things over there in the Philippines then nothing will be accomplished. Blame the government officials for allowing too many schools of nursing to operate in the Philippines, blame the school authorities for providing sub-standard education and training to their students and blame the unqualified student nurses and their parents for enrolling their sons and daughters in nursing schools.

    Being a "volunteer" in a government hospital instead of working as a gainfully employed nurse is one proof of the profound problems of the nursing profession in the Philippines. There are too many nurses in the Philippines and hundreds of thousands more are in the pipeline means the competition for nursing jobs in the Philippines will be that much more intense in the near future.

    The roots of the problem are that there are too many student nurses who should not have been accepted in nursing schools in the first place. And sub-standard schools of nursing are being allowed to continually operate by the Philippine government. Four hundred schools of nursing in the Philippines is too many for a country the size of the Philippines. Therefore, the Philippines is churning out poorly educated nurses many of whom cannot even pass the local nursing licensure examination.

    Wait until those 950,000 student nurses graduate from nursing schools in a few short years. With so many of them poorly educated, expect the same results as in past years when those student nurses take the local nursing licensure examination. Less than half of them will pass the examination. For the sake of conversation, say 400,000 of them become licensed nurses, how and where would those nurses find jobs in the Philippines?

    The U.S. has retrogression, therefore it would be many years before any of those nurses will have that vaunted interview in the U.S. Embassy in Manila. From what I've read in this forum the European Union countries no longer employ nurses from the Philippines with BSN degrees as nurses, but only as caregivers or as nursing assistants.

    There are fewer and fewer countries where Filipino nurses can immigrate to. Yes, Australia and New Zealand still import nurses from the Philippines, but can you honestly believe that those two countries with relatively small populations can absorb the HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of unemployed nurses from the Philippines? You can expect that those countries to hire only the best nurses from top schools of nursing in the Philippines.

    That leaves the Middle Eastern countries. Those countries pay foreign nurses less than $1,000/month. Admittedly, that amount is more than the $200/month that nurses get paid in the Philippines. But $1,000/month is so much less than the starting salary of nurses $8,000+ in major cities in California.

    Congratulations to you for passing the CGFNS, NCLEX and IELTS. I assume that your first choice is the U.S. and I can understand that. Let's just hope that you can immigrate to the U.S. someday. You'll need lots of luck personally because you will be competing with over half a million or more other Filipino nurses.

    Over-supply of nurses in the Philippines? Yes, indeed.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
    griffon, jenna18, lawrence01, and 3 others like this.

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