US demand for Filipino nurses declining - educator - page 7

us demand for filipino nurses declining - educator change in work attitude... i wonder if this is related to the nurses who got "fast track" bsns, all in less than 6 months. cgfns &... Read More

  1. Visit  pinoy_guy profile page
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    Quote from suzanne4
    and the better part is that the above posters are actually from the philippines, and are actually in the us working in the rn role and have been doing so for sometime. they are quite factual in what they are posting.
    it's kinda strange that some people would rather believe the rumors flying around in manila, rather than the experiences of people who are actually in the us.
  2. Visit  crossbow profile page
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    Quote from pinoy_guy
    using big macs as a reference point was not my idea. i think a female economist was the main proponent of this idea, and it's called big mac economics.

    you don't have to convert to pesos. you convert your salary to the number of big macs, and it will give you an idea of the purchasing power of your money.
    being a cardiac nurse at heart and by profession, big macs are not my ideal point of comparison. this is due to the fact that i will need to take into account the money i will have to spent for stents placed when i have my mi!!




    Quote from pinoy_guy
    i don't have that much money to spend yet, so i can't really say at this point.

    however, i can say that buying online is much cheaper than buying from the stores.

    and the products arrive in pristine condition.

    i know i like buying online. my so many vintage collections have had acquisitions purchased through it
  3. Visit  pinoy_guy profile page
    0
    Quote from crossbow
    being a cardiac nurse at heart and by profession, big macs are not my ideal point of comparison. this is due to the fact that i will need to take into account the money i will have to spent for stents placed when i have my mi!!
    i'm just waiting for a filipino economist to introduce the "fishball economics."

    less chances of heart attacks, but increased risk for amebiasis.


    but we'll be talking hundreds to thousands of fishballs.


    Quote from crossbow
    i know i like buying online. my so many vintage collections have had acquisitions purchased through it
    amazing, huh?

    to receive mail and parcels intact?
  4. Visit  SF Fog profile page
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    Quote from rnhawaii34
    [$8,000.00 to $10,000.00 a month.....what are they? supermodels????? can somebody tell me if what state these nurses are working at? maybe i should move there!!!! where are they getting this digits?????? busy doing what? i think who ever turn down that much $$$ is a total idiot!!!
    to rnhawaii34: i have been an rn here in the sf bay area, ca. for over 20 years therefore i can give you an expert answer. if you work as an acute care rn in the san francisco area you will be making $8,000 to $10,000 per month. just check the web sites of the major hospitals and you will read about how much they offer the rn's. of course if you are a new grad you will earn a little less, but if you have at least several years of acute care experience in the united states you will be making this much.

    many of the acute care hospitals also offer sign-on bonuses to the tune of $5,000, and if you have recent icu experience or other specialties they will offer you up to $10,000 sign-on bonus.

    someone posted that the high cost of housing in the sf bay area is a major negative factor in living here and i couldn't agree more. but the sf bay area is one of the most desirable places in the usa in which to live. there is cultural diversity, the climate is mild, food is great, there are lots of nice places to see and visit, etc. and there are many hospitals where nurses can apply for employment.

    the state mandated nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:5 is going to be 1:4 come january 1st., 2008. if the hospitals in the state will abide the mandate remains to be seen though. the large hospital where i work has been hiring a lot of new rn's. i think nursing care will only get better with the improved staffing ratio.
  5. Visit  SilverSurfer profile page
    0
    Quote from SF Fog
    To RNHawaii34: I have been an RN here in the SF Bay Area, Ca. for over 20 years therefore I can give you an expert answer. If you work as an acute care RN in the San Francisco Area you will be making $8,000 to $10,000 per month. Just check the web sites of the major hospitals and you will read about how much they offer the RN's. Of course if you are a new grad you will earn a little less, but if you have at least several years of acute care experience in the United States you will be making this much.

    Many of the acute care hospitals also offer sign-on bonuses to the tune of $5,000, and if you have recent ICU experience or other specialties they will offer you up to $10,000 sign-on bonus.

    Someone posted that the high cost of housing in the SF Bay Area is a major negative factor in living here and I couldn't agree more. But the SF Bay Area is one of the most desirable places in the USA in which to live. There is cultural diversity, the climate is mild, food is great, there are lots of nice places to see and visit, etc. and there are many hospitals where nurses can apply for employment.

    The state mandated nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:5 is going to be 1:4 come January 1st., 2008. If the hospitals in the state will abide the mandate remains to be seen though. The large hospital where I work has been hiring a lot of new RN's. I think nursing care will only get better with the improved staffing ratio.
    :yeahthat:
  6. Visit  swtgrl_bee profile page
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    Quote from SF Fog
    To RNHawaii34: I have been an RN here in the SF Bay Area, Ca. for over 20 years therefore I can give you an expert answer. If you work as an acute care RN in the San Francisco Area you will be making $8,000 to $10,000 per month. Just check the web sites of the major hospitals and you will read about how much they offer the RN's. Of course if you are a new grad you will earn a little less, but if you have at least several years of acute care experience in the United States you will be making this much.

    Many of the acute care hospitals also offer sign-on bonuses to the tune of $5,000, and if you have recent ICU experience or other specialties they will offer you up to $10,000 sign-on bonus.

    Someone posted that the high cost of housing in the SF Bay Area is a major negative factor in living here and I couldn't agree more. But the SF Bay Area is one of the most desirable places in the USA in which to live. There is cultural diversity, the climate is mild, food is great, there are lots of nice places to see and visit, etc. and there are many hospitals where nurses can apply for employment.

    The state mandated nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:5 is going to be 1:4 come January 1st., 2008. If the hospitals in the state will abide the mandate remains to be seen though. The large hospital where I work has been hiring a lot of new RN's. I think nursing care will only get better with the improved staffing ratio.
    very well said.
  7. Visit  RNHawaii34 profile page
    0
    Quote from sf fog
    to rnhawaii34: i have been an rn here in the sf bay area, ca. for over 20 years therefore i can give you an expert answer. if you work as an acute care rn in the san francisco area you will be making $8,000 to $10,000 per month. just check the web sites of the major hospitals and you will read about how much they offer the rn's. of course if you are a new grad you will earn a little less, but if you have at least several years of acute care experience in the united states you will be making this much.

    many of the acute care hospitals also offer sign-on bonuses to the tune of $5,000, and if you have recent icu experience or other specialties they will offer you up to $10,000 sign-on bonus.

    someone posted that the high cost of housing in the sf bay area is a major negative factor in living here and i couldn't agree more. but the sf bay area is one of the most desirable places in the usa in which to live. there is cultural diversity, the climate is mild, food is great, there are lots of nice places to see and visit, etc. and there are many hospitals where nurses can apply for employment.

    the state mandated nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:5 is going to be 1:4 come january 1st., 2008. if the hospitals in the state will abide the mandate remains to be seen though. the large hospital where i work has been hiring a lot of new rn's. i think nursing care will only get better with the improved staffing ratio.
    yup, i heard that part of cali is very expensive, and personally, it doesn't matter if you make that much money and the cost of living is expensive. i don't have any dependents, ( just monthly mortgage ), i do not want to pay more taxes, so i guess i want to make "just right" amount of moolah every two weeks. i used to work in an acute setting as well, and we had 1:4 nurse patient ratio in medsurg stepdown telemetry. hawaii is expensive too, but i will not trade it for anything, we have a lot people from different background as well, great food, nicer, polite people, beautiful, clean warm beaches...i'm in the best place in the world!!! don't get me wrong i love california, being there for a week vacation every year is enough.
  8. Visit  jedv#1 profile page
    0
    i agree with seno on "There are more nursing schools now and so many nursing graduates. These schools have become mere diploma mills," Seno said. ever since there was an increase in demand for nurses in the States and in other countries abroad, there has been the proliferation of nursing schools in the Philippines. even other schools and universities which previously do not offer nursing in their curriculum suddenly turns up with a BSN course. they are just taking advantage for this increase in demand for their own financial gain and sacrifice the quality of their graduates.
  9. Visit  suzanne4 profile page
    0
    Funnier thing to add to this:

    There has not been an increase in demand over the past few years in the US, it has not changed. And the US still only grants less than 10,000 green cards for all under the EB-3 category. And that is not just nurses, but all professions that hold a BS degree.

    When there are more than 632,000 currently enrolled in nursing schools, you do the math. Where are they all going to get jobs? It just makes it that much harder for those that always wished to go to the US, get to the US.
  10. Visit  greenjungle profile page
    0
    The demand for PH nurses is over.
  11. Visit  rogue_maverick profile page
    0
    Quote from greenjungle
    The demand for PH nurses is over.
    That's only as far as the USA is concerned.
  12. Visit  Daly City RN profile page
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    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Update: I am now working as a nursing preceptor/supervisor/telehealth nurse at a nursing agency here in the San Francisco Bay Area located on the Peninsula just south of the city of San Francisco, California.

    Almost everyday there are RNs applying for a job in our office. Many possess years of U.S. nursing experience. We prefer RNs with BSN or a Master's degree in Nursing.

    Just this week a young U.S.-born Filipino nurse with a California RN license but with no acute care hospital experience in the U.S. applied for a job at our nursing agency office. I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news to him, I told him that we could not consider hiring him because he has no local hospital experience. The poor young nurse asked me where he could find a nursing job in the San Francisco Bay Area. Again, I was the bearer of bad news but I suspect that he already knew that most local hospitals don't hire nurses with no experience working in the U.S.

    There is now a large pool of highly experienced RNs looking for jobs in the SF Bay Area because of the lucrative salary of RNs over here ($9,000-$10,000 or more /month) . It is expensive to recruit foreign nurses therefore hospitals here have no incentive to recruit foreign nurses when there are thousands of RNs applying locally and they are already highly experienced in U.S.-style nursing.

    Filipino nurses can still hope of working in Australia or the Middle East, but forget the U.S. for the meantime unless you have a family-based immigrant petition.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


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