US demand for Filipino nurses declining - educator - page 7

by pinoy_guy

12,688 Views | 76 Comments

us demand for filipino nurses declining - educator change in work attitude... i wonder if this is related to the nurses who got "fast track" bsns, all in less than 6 months. cgfns & uscis have to crack down on these... Read More


  1. 0
    I do not agree to this statement because if it's the case now why are recruiters here in the Philippines still hiring Filipino nurses.
    Simple! Because of money! Some agencies still recruits nurses illegaly. PArt of the contract may not be explained properly. Like for example the Sentosa case.. Although it was not proven due to lack of evidence. Try to read some thread... It might enlighten you....

    I personally believe that this is just an opinion of someone who doesn't know the real score, commenting on an issue that is isolated and does not represent the general working ethics of the Filipino nurses in majority
    Mind you.. I might be not an expert with this matters but they're right. I don't question the Filipino ethics and I'm not generalizing either, but there are some unethical Filipino. Looking for greener pasture by breaching contracts and some are are out of the line! We experience it here in the Philippines, and definitely they experience it in other countries...
  2. 0
    Quote from caloy
    I don't think anyone meant that hospitals are not recruiting filipinos anymore. It's just that more and more hospitals would rather not want to because of nurses not fulfilling their contracts. Previous posters have shared their own experiences regarding that.
  3. 0
    Quote from suzanne4
    sorry, but even though there are recruiters, most are not recruiting for hospitals, and there are also no visas available, and we do not expect them for sometime. recruiters have been making promises there for years and many have been unable to live up to what has been promised. many are also recruiting there illegally.

    and the better part is that the above posters are actually from the philippines, and are actually in the us working in the rn role and have been doing so for sometime. they are quite factual in what they are posting.

    i understand that you are new here, but you need to be aware of what is actually going on, not the rosy picture that some of these recruiters are boasting about.


    example, i am sure that the ones from the border towns in texas, where they do not have the ratio laws have not told you that you will have 12 to 15 patients that you are responsible for and this is in a hospital and not a long term care facility. you must always check out everything before signing.

    and there are many other threads here where specifics as to what is going on in pi is actually discussed on this foum. please have a read.
  4. 0
    Quote from pinoy_guy



    cardiac enzymes are done q6h x 3.
    here its q4 x 3

    Quote from pinoy_guy
    manila is kinda similar...but the scale is disproportionate.

    minimum daily wage in manila is $7/day...and a big mac meal is $2, almost 1/3 of your daily wage--leaving you with $5.

    minimum hourly wage is $30 in nyc, and a big mac meal is $6...so assuming you work 8 hours a day, that's $240 daily wage, leaving you with $234 after your big mac meal.
    yes but we try not to equate dollar to pesos.
    you earn in dollars you spend in dollars........

    generally

    living in the city, one spends more dollars for an item than if living in a suburb or township, right?

    just like in manila and the provinces.
    spend more pesos for an item than buying it in the town or province.

    so save and live outside a city ha ha ha
  5. 0
    Quote from crossbow
    yes but we try not to equate dollar to pesos.
    you earn in dollars you spend in dollars........
    using big macs as a reference point was not my idea. i think a female economist was the main proponent of this idea, and it's called big mac economics.

    you don't have to convert to pesos. you convert your salary to the number of big macs, and it will give you an idea of the purchasing power of your money.


    Quote from crossbow
    generally

    living in the city, one spends more dollars for an item than if living in a suburb or township, right?

    just like in manila and the provinces.
    spend more pesos for an item than buying it in the town or province.

    so save and live outside a city ha ha ha
    i don't have that much money to spend yet, so i can't really say at this point.

    however, i can say that buying online is much cheaper than buying from the stores.

    and the products arrive in pristine condition.

  6. 0
    Quote from suzanne4
    and the better part is that the above posters are actually from the philippines, and are actually in the us working in the rn role and have been doing so for sometime. they are quite factual in what they are posting.
    it's kinda strange that some people would rather believe the rumors flying around in manila, rather than the experiences of people who are actually in the us.
  7. 0
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    using big macs as a reference point was not my idea. i think a female economist was the main proponent of this idea, and it's called big mac economics.

    you don't have to convert to pesos. you convert your salary to the number of big macs, and it will give you an idea of the purchasing power of your money.
    being a cardiac nurse at heart and by profession, big macs are not my ideal point of comparison. this is due to the fact that i will need to take into account the money i will have to spent for stents placed when i have my mi!!




    Quote from pinoy_guy
    i don't have that much money to spend yet, so i can't really say at this point.

    however, i can say that buying online is much cheaper than buying from the stores.

    and the products arrive in pristine condition.

    i know i like buying online. my so many vintage collections have had acquisitions purchased through it
  8. 0
    Quote from crossbow
    being a cardiac nurse at heart and by profession, big macs are not my ideal point of comparison. this is due to the fact that i will need to take into account the money i will have to spent for stents placed when i have my mi!!
    i'm just waiting for a filipino economist to introduce the "fishball economics."

    less chances of heart attacks, but increased risk for amebiasis.


    but we'll be talking hundreds to thousands of fishballs.


    Quote from crossbow
    i know i like buying online. my so many vintage collections have had acquisitions purchased through it
    amazing, huh?

    to receive mail and parcels intact?
  9. 0
    Quote from rnhawaii34
    [$8,000.00 to $10,000.00 a month.....what are they? supermodels????? can somebody tell me if what state these nurses are working at? maybe i should move there!!!! where are they getting this digits?????? busy doing what? i think who ever turn down that much $$$ is a total idiot!!!
    to rnhawaii34: i have been an rn here in the sf bay area, ca. for over 20 years therefore i can give you an expert answer. if you work as an acute care rn in the san francisco area you will be making $8,000 to $10,000 per month. just check the web sites of the major hospitals and you will read about how much they offer the rn's. of course if you are a new grad you will earn a little less, but if you have at least several years of acute care experience in the united states you will be making this much.

    many of the acute care hospitals also offer sign-on bonuses to the tune of $5,000, and if you have recent icu experience or other specialties they will offer you up to $10,000 sign-on bonus.

    someone posted that the high cost of housing in the sf bay area is a major negative factor in living here and i couldn't agree more. but the sf bay area is one of the most desirable places in the usa in which to live. there is cultural diversity, the climate is mild, food is great, there are lots of nice places to see and visit, etc. and there are many hospitals where nurses can apply for employment.

    the state mandated nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:5 is going to be 1:4 come january 1st., 2008. if the hospitals in the state will abide the mandate remains to be seen though. the large hospital where i work has been hiring a lot of new rn's. i think nursing care will only get better with the improved staffing ratio.
  10. 0
    Quote from SF Fog
    To RNHawaii34: I have been an RN here in the SF Bay Area, Ca. for over 20 years therefore I can give you an expert answer. If you work as an acute care RN in the San Francisco Area you will be making $8,000 to $10,000 per month. Just check the web sites of the major hospitals and you will read about how much they offer the RN's. Of course if you are a new grad you will earn a little less, but if you have at least several years of acute care experience in the United States you will be making this much.

    Many of the acute care hospitals also offer sign-on bonuses to the tune of $5,000, and if you have recent ICU experience or other specialties they will offer you up to $10,000 sign-on bonus.

    Someone posted that the high cost of housing in the SF Bay Area is a major negative factor in living here and I couldn't agree more. But the SF Bay Area is one of the most desirable places in the USA in which to live. There is cultural diversity, the climate is mild, food is great, there are lots of nice places to see and visit, etc. and there are many hospitals where nurses can apply for employment.

    The state mandated nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:5 is going to be 1:4 come January 1st., 2008. If the hospitals in the state will abide the mandate remains to be seen though. The large hospital where I work has been hiring a lot of new RN's. I think nursing care will only get better with the improved staffing ratio.
    :yeahthat:


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