stay or go back to the philippines

  1. 0
    hey guys i need your opinion. Ok heres the deal. I was in nursing school last year. Unfortunately, i failed out of the program Now im contemplating if i should go back to the Philippines to study nursing or stay in the States and keep applying to different nursing schools. Im really having a hard time deciding so i would appreciate if you guys can offer some insights.

    Study in the States

    Pros:
    - US grad - no hussle with license
    - advance technology
    - better CIs
    - if everything goes right, it would only take me 3 years
    - build connections


    Cons:
    - very expensive.. most likely will be in 20-25 thousand dollars debt when i graduate
    - its hard to get into nursing school (my biggest problem.. the whole process is just too stressful)
    - school is very fast paced and overwhelming (its very overwhelming because of the amount of information they throw at students in a limited amount of time)
    - have to buy a car to get to school and clinical sites (plus gas expense and insurance)
    - no assurance of getting in. This is what i really hate the most. I have to take additional prerequisite classes (cost alot of $) just to be able to apply to different schools. Yet theres no guarantee that i'll be able to get in to the school that i wanted to go to
    - terror CIs who like to make clinicals a nightmare for students (theres gotta be atleast 1 CI that is like that for every nursing school)

    Study in the Philippines

    Pros:
    - Cheap tuition
    - Plus you're gonna get a BSN
    - no need to apply to different schools and worry if you'll get accepted or not. You can just pick the school you want and as long as you have the money to pay for the tuition, you'll get in. (i know some schools like UP etc etc.. that have very high standards and really look at the grades of the students but for the most part.. most schools in the Philippines, its all about the money. They'll let you in. If you're not fit to be a nurse, they'll fail you. Win win situation for the school. They get your money and their reputation as a school won't be tarnished. Am i right?)
    - nursing classes are not as overwhelming? because i heard students start taking nursing classes in their freshman year which means more time to digest the information
    - Girls jk hehe

    Cons:
    - have to start out as a freshman even though i already took alot of classes in the states
    - alot of things can change in 4-5 year span with nclex, requirements in the states, etc etc
    - have to leave my family back in the States
    - hot and humid weather in the Philippines
    - less qualified CIs
    - hospitals are not as advanced technologically
    - i heard getting clinical experience is also hard (but then again i also heard that you get to do more things freely in the Philippines without worrying about the repercussions of your actions.. which is good for the students not so much for the patients haha. You'll learn alot as a student.)
    - i have to take the NLE and it will take 6 months before i can get my license which means its not just 4 years but rather 4 yrs and 6 months.. maybe even longer
    - forever a foreign grad.. which means harder time transferring credits to school or getting a license from different states
    - since ill be living with my brother, hehe.. instant noodle diet ftl



    basically it comes down to this

    US grad + more stress + 30 thousand dollars debt

    or

    Cheap tuition + 4-5 year schooling + forever considered as a foreign grad but less stress (don't have to worry about getting accepted to nursing school.. i can just focus solely on nursing)
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Mar 12, '10 : Reason: Tagalog removed

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  2. 50 Comments...

  3. 2
    ok I raised my eyebrow at the less qualifies CIs part. Are you trying to imply Phil nursing grads are incompetent nurses? If my logic serves me right, "less qualified CIs" produce mediocre nurses.

    First of, you have the VISA.. thats all that matters. So after you get the BSN degree here in the Phil, you can right away take the NCLEX-RN. Im not sure if they require you to have a license from the country you graduated from before they allow you to take the NCLEX.

    Just deal with the warm humid weather, it's not like you're going to attend classes under the blazing sun! With regards to hospital facilities, there are tertiary hospitals with modern facilities like St. Lukes etc.

    It's cheap here in the Phil. Nursing is the same everywhere. I know many nurses who graduated from the Phil, who works in the US and are doing well in their jobs. Btw, whats the issue with being a foreign grad?
    pipay22 and black_knight like this.
  4. 2
    study in US...the outcome is much better and easier..try 2 look for another school...search the web...then compare the programs they offer..u can also look for a part-time job while schooling at least tuition fees will be ease a little bit...just dont give up and study hard...rather than going back here in phils...
    Fiona59 and black_knight like this.
  5. 3
    On of the reasons why the US is hard to get into is that they only take students who are qualified and have a chance to pass the NCLEX. Being a nurse is stressful having that is why US nursing schools are stressful.

    One pro you did not put on your list - US students - 89% or greater passing the NCLEX. Foreign Grad Less than 50%.

    One con if you are not a citizen- leaving the US for more than 4 years you may loose your green card.

    Several routes are less expensive in the USA. Get your LPN and then become a RN can be done in 2 years and many students do it without any loans.
  6. 0
    Quote from enniad
    ok I raised my eyebrow at the less qualifies CIs part. Are you trying to imply Phil nursing grads are incompetent nurses? If my logic serves me right, "less qualified CIs" produce mediocre nurses.
    oh no definitely not. Don't get me wrong. Its just that i heard stories that there are RN in the Philippines who became CIs even though they don't have significant amount of clinical experience

    First of, you have the VISA.. thats all that matters. So after you get the BSN degree here in the Phil, you can right away take the NCLEX-RN. Im not sure if they require you to have a license from the country you graduated from before they allow you to take the NCLEX.
    Yes a license from the country where the person graduated is one of the requirements before he/she can take the nclex

    Just deal with the warm humid weather, it's not like you're going to attend classes under the blazing sun! With regards to hospital facilities, there are tertiary hospitals with modern facilities like St. Lukes etc.
    yea my brother said the same thing. He said if I go back to the Philippines, go study at Trinity University since theyre part of St. Lukes and they produce quality nurses

    It's cheap here in the Phil. Nursing is the same everywhere. I know many nurses who graduated from the Phil, who works in the US and are doing well in their jobs. Btw, whats the issue with being a foreign grad?
    Yup I know alot of good pinoy nurses here who work in the hospital.
  7. 1
    my brother is a permanent resident here but would like to study nsg in the phils bec. he does not want to have a debt and its more difficult in here. but what most of my relatives suggested is that he should take it here bec. it wont take that long, i mean 2 yrs vs. 5 yrs there.
    black_knight likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from enniad
    ok I raised my eyebrow at the less qualifies CIs part. Are you trying to imply Phil nursing grads are incompetent nurses? If my logic serves me right, "less qualified CIs" produce mediocre nurses ...

    ... Nursing is the same everywhere. I know many nurses who graduated from the Phil, who works in the US and are doing well in their jobs. Btw, whats the issue with being a foreign grad?
    Many people have discussed here that (some? many? all?) PI nursing schools hire new graduates with no nursing experience beyond their own education as instructors. This would never be permitted in the US. You have to have at least a few years of solid clinical experience to be considered for a teaching position. How does your logic process the idea of being taught nursing by people who are fresh out of school themselves?

    Nursing is not "the same everywhere." There are significant and substantive differences in nursing education and practice in different countries. However, the PI schools have for decades modeled their curricula on US nursing schools, since so much of the interest in nursing there is to secure a means of getting to the US, so they may experience less "culture shock" (at least in terms of nursing practice) than nurses from other countries coming to the US. The pass rate on the NCLEX-RN for foreign graduates, though, is only about half what the rate is for US graduates. I don't say that to suggest that US nurses are better nurses than those from other countries, just that people educated in other countries/systems have a harder time passing the exam and adjusting to practice here.

    The "issue" with being a foreign grad in the US is that someone who was educated outside the US, even a US citizen who was educated elsewhere, will have additional expenses, paperwork, and requirements to meet for licensure, not just for initial licensure but every time that person wants to get licensed in another US state, for the rest of her/his career.
  9. 2
    We are kinda in the same boat. Although I messed up in a private nursing school, with 1 yr remaining toward an associate's. So, I'm staying in the US to enter another school and not repeat this again. I feel much more confident now than before, because I have had 1 year of experience as a nursing student. I do wish that it translated to getting a job, unfortunately, it doesn't.

    Currently, I'm attending a public college instead of a private nursing school, like I did before. I assume that this college is more my style, since I did successfully receive my first associate's degree at a public college.
    As I said before, I feel much more confident. I have begun to change my attitude towards school. I'm going to use every moment in school to learn and not just to get by (passing with a mere C). I'm going to strive for the best and that's what these professors want out of us. With my first stint as a nursing student, I wasn't as attentive and mature about class as I should've been. So, now that i'm out of that situation, I've been feeling that I've gotta get back in. The nursing field isn't the same without me working in it.

    I'm going to use the Phil. as a last resort because I would have to start everything from scratch, plus its supposedly 5 yrs towards a bachelor's. And the trip to get there is steep, regardless of who you know. Plus, I still have previous expenses to cover.

    If I were you, I'd weigh my options further. There are other nursing schools in the US and just because one is more prestigious than the other, doesn't mean that you'll succeed at the prestigious school. I had to learn that the hard way, but hey, as long as your still pursuing nursing and you have what's important to keep you going (that is "heart" or "puso"), you should be able to pull through and focus. Best of luck to us all! I pray for us all.
    Ginger's Mom and black_knight like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from StayingOnThePath
    We are kinda in the same boat. Although I messed up in a private nursing school, with 1 yr remaining toward an associate's. So, I'm staying in the US to enter another school and not repeat this again. I feel much more confident now than before, because I have had 1 year of experience as a nursing student. I do wish that it translated to getting a job, unfortunately, it doesn't.

    Currently, I'm attending a public college instead of a private nursing school, like I did before. I assume that this college is more my style, since I did successfully receive my first associate's degree at a public college.
    As I said before, I feel much more confident. I have begun to change my attitude towards school. I'm going to use every moment in school to learn and not just to get by (passing with a mere C). I'm going to strive for the best and that's what these professors want out of us. With my first stint as a nursing student, I wasn't as attentive and mature about class as I should've been. So, now that i'm out of that situation, I've been feeling that I've gotta get back in. The nursing field isn't the same without me working in it.
    I can definitely relate to your post. When I was in nursing school, I was a passive student. And like you, I was barely passing with C's. However, it's not like I wasn't serious with school. It's just nursing is really tough and overwhelming.

    Anyway Ive been working on my weaknesses since the day I failed out of nursing school. Actually this past year Ive been studying my med-surg book over and over again. Just really trying to master and understand the pathophysiology, symptoms, meds of every diseases. I also started working at a local hospital as a PCT so I can become comfortable at the environment. Hopefully, that will get rid of my nervousness whenver im doing clinicals.

    btw you mentioned you're currently attending public college? are you taking your prerequisites? or are you already in the nursing program? Sorry to hear that you got kicked out of a private nursing school. The tuition must be very expensive.


    I'm going to use the Phil. as a last resort because I would have to start everything from scratch, plus its supposedly 5 yrs towards a bachelor's. And the trip to get there is steep, regardless of who you know. Plus, I still have previous expenses to cover.

    If I were you, I'd weigh my options further. There are other nursing schools in the US and just because one is more prestigious than the other, doesn't mean that you'll succeed at the prestigious school. I had to learn that the hard way, but hey, as long as your still pursuing nursing and you have what's important to keep you going (that is "heart" or "puso"), you should be able to pull through and focus. Best of luck to us all! I pray for us all.
    Yea Im thinking the same thing. My initial plan right now is to stay in the States 1 more year and apply to different nursing schools. If i don't get accepted in any of them, then i would go back to the Philippines next year.
  11. 1
    Quote from black_knight
    hey guys i need your opinion. ok heres the deal. i was in nursing school last year. unfortunately, i failed out of the program now im contemplating if i should go back to the philippines to study nursing or stay in the states and keep applying to different nursing schools. im really having a hard time deciding so i would appreciate if you guys can offer some insights.

    study in the states

    pros:
    - us grad - no hussle with license
    - advance technology
    - better cis
    - if everything goes right, it would only take me 3 years
    - build connections


    cons:
    - school is very fast paced and overwhelming (its very overwhelming because of the amount of information they throw at students in a limited amount of time) ..........
    - terror cis who like to make clinicals a nightmare for students (theres gotta be atleast 1 ci that is like that for every nursing school)

    study in the philippines

    pros:
    - no need to apply to different schools and worry if you'll get accepted or not. you can just pick the school you want and as long as you have the money to pay for the tuition, you'll get in. .........most schools in the philippines, its all about the money. they'll let you in.........
    cons:
    - alot of things can change in 4-5 year span with nclex, requirements in the states, etc etc
    ..........
    - less qualified cis
    - hospitals are not as advanced technologically
    - i heard getting clinical experience is also hard (but then again i also heard that you get to do more things freely in the philippines without worrying about the repercussions of your actions.. which is good for the students not so much for the patients haha. you'll learn alot as a student.)
    ...........time transferring credits to school or getting a license from different states

    pros & cons in the us:

    you've raised some very good points.

    1. no hassle and have to worry about licensing
    2. advanced technology
    3. qualified clinical instructors
    4. build connections

    building connections is very important because in this day in age, hospitals can be very picky on who they hire and who they don't hire. as a foreign grad you'll always be looked at as a foreign grad. most likely they will choose a person who graduated from the us because they know the reputation of the schools, and when you're a foreign graduate the us doesn't have any regulation on what other countries do for nursing. the transcripts will get evaluated, and they can pass, but it's up to each state if they will allow someone to sit for the nclex or not. reality is, they don't have to.

    5. nursing school is very fast paced and overwhelming
    6. ci who make it a nightmare during nursing school


    if you think nursing school is fast paced and overwhelming, just wait until you start working. it really gets intense. clinical nurses that do make it a nightmare for students are only preparing you for what's in the real world. i've learned that while in nursing school, and consider yourself lucky if you end up with one of those instructors. i had one of those clinical instructors, and if you can handle her, you can handle any situation. consider it a blessing. if you feel that nursing school is overwhelming and fast paced, then maybe you need to reconsider your career path and choose something else. i'm sorry but that's the way it is in the real world. nursing isn't easy and if you can't handle it then look for something else. i'm not trying to be harsh i'm just trying to make you see how important these issues are that you brought up.

    pros & cons in philippines:

    1. you can basically pick the school you want to go to as long as you pay your tuition. as long as you have the money you'll get in
    2. less qualified clinical instructors
    3. you can do things more freely in the philippines with out any repercussions of your actions.
    4. transfering your degree & licensing
    5. less technology

    so basically what you're stating and what's been suspected about schooling in the philippines (this is now a days, not like before when it was strict) it doesn't matter as long as you pay your tuition. there's no competition if you can basically get accepted into any school there. i know there are some that still have high standards, strict on who they admit, and produce high qualified nurses, but most aren't like that anymore. less qualified clinical instructors, yes there are many less qualified cis who are incompetent. before some of you start wagging your little fingers at me and start pulling a jerry springer let me explain something. if a ci has never worked as a floor nurse before and they're fresh out of school and land a job as a ci how can they consider themselves competent enough to teach a group of student nurses? the only experience they have are their own clinical experiences. they haven't spent enough time on the floor as a staff nurse, they have seen very little in their clinical experience. they have nothing to offer other than book knowledge that they just learned themselves. so yes, they would be incompetent as ci. however, they wouldn't be incompetent as new staff nurses. they have a lot to learn as new nurses, and that's why they're getting their experience as staff nurses. they need the experience in order to advance themselves as nurses whether they want to get into management, or teach nursing. but as new ci with zero experience as a floor nurse, then yes they're incompetent in that aspect. me, for example, i'm a new lvn with less than 6 months experience. i know i'm not competent enough to teach a group of new vocational nursing students. i don't have the qualified experience. i can offer tutoring, and offer my experiences as a cna and while i am in nursing school, but i have a lot to learn in the field of nursing. i have nothing to offer new students as a ci, so in that aspect i would be incompetent in that field of nursing as a ci. now as a new grad lvn, i'm competent enough to get a job as a lvn, and gain the experience and knowledge for the future if i decide to get into teaching nursing. it's a learning process. ok, now with regards to doing things freely with out any repercussions is a scary thing. you're in the field of nursing to learn, and you must take responsiblity for your actions, and you learn from it. it's not a good thing if you can do things as you please and not be responsible for your actions. i wouldn't want nurses who were like that while in nursing school. ummm, please send me a rn who basically knows what they're doing and is more cautious. transfering your education and trying to get licensed is a big deal. you'll waste more time, effort, and frustration if you decide to go to a school that's outside of the us and your intentions are to practice in the us. you can get done faster in the us and get licensed faster, plus you wont be forever looked upon as a foreign grad. you will be looked at as someone who was educated here in the us and your diploma wont be questioned. less technology can be true, and one of the good things about going to school in the us is that you have all the high tech equipment to learn with. it's amazing what you see. yes, you can learn it on the job but it's better to already be exposed to it rather than look at it for the first time and need to be trained on it.

    whatever decision you make, please weigh out all the pros and cons. you flunked out of nursing school for a reason. i'm not saying that you're stupid because you're not. all i'm saying is that maybe you didnt' take things as seriously as you should of, and now since you've seen what happens when you don't make the grades, you were asked to leave nursing school. you're now taking responsibility for your actions, you're seeing the importance of an education, and you're weighing all the pros and cons between nursing here and nursing abroad. it's making you think, and now you're willing to buckle down and start all over again in order to finish. good luck!
    black_knight likes this.


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