Philippine Paramedical and Technical School - page 5

by hilda78

11,886 Visits | 55 Comments

I am a US citizen who is thinking of enrolling in the Philipine PAramedical and Technical School ASN RN program, where the theory is done online, but I have to go back to the philippine for the clinical portion. The curriculum is... Read More


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    Unfortunatley we are seeing people who are licensed in another state being denied in CA because CA still do their own evaluation and really clamping down if clinical and theory are not done at the same time. In the same way they are refusing Excelsior RN trained nurses
  2. 0
    You need to investigate the specifics of the California situation.

    Excelsior claims to have the largest nursing program in the US but I have never heard of them. There is a great demand in the US for RN education and some people seek to capitalize on this opportunity. Everyone should be very, very cautious evaluating a non-traditional college. Traditional colleges are those that are government supported, state, county or city or those with a religious tradition - most of the "name" universities in the US.

    Excelsior College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "Buyer beware"
  3. 0
    [quote=rktbrkr;6207282]just a couple of general observations.
    rn like most professional licenses in the us is generally recognized across state lines so if you were licensed as an rn in nevada, for example, you would probably be able to transfer your license to california even though your clinical and theory were not concurrent.

    that is incorrect for foreign graduates, each state has their own policy regarding foreign educated nurses. some are posting here that they are unable to get a nursing license due to the concurrency issue

    rn is required for us work visa, lpn won't help with that, also lpn training is not classified as academic in the us so you won't get credit toward rn academic credit requirements but many nursing schools want to encourage lpns to step up to rn and give some admission preference to lpns who hold a license in the us. the problem is you won't be able to move to the us to get the lpn license.

    [color=#00ff00]that is not true, many asn programs give credit for the lpn even foreign trained.



    my advice is that if you are interested in working in the us go straight for the rn, it's really only 12-18 months more academic work and you absolutely need it for us visa. there is a huge pay difference between lpn and rn here in the us, you would recover all your additional schooling costs the very first year you worked in the us. an lpn might start at $15/hr here and an rn $25-30/hr but the rn pay scale moves up farther and faster than pln, the lpn is what we call a "dead end" job here, no logical progressions to move up. employers continue to invest money in additional training and education in their rns here.

    [color=#00ff00]
    where is there an academic program for bsn that is only 12 months to 18 months more than a lpn?[color=#00ff00] lpn is one year and bsn is 4 years . i don't know where you are getting the information about lpns, while job choices are more limited, lpns get the same continuing education as rns, and the pay between lpns and rns in skilled nursing ( where most adns are finding employment ) is nearly the same.

    you can get a good rn education in the phils for a fraction of the us cost, follow up your phils rn education with a good neclex prep course and you're on your way. there may be more sophisticated rn training in the us but once you get here you will receive additional training from your employer that will cover any shortcomings there.
    [color=#00ff00]

    new grad programs are very competitive to get in to, plus going to school in the usa there are opportunities to network. the failure rate for foreign graduates on the nclex is over 70%.

    ps online nursing education is gaining credibility here in the us - for example georgetown university one of the very best universities in the us now has a masters degree in nursing that is largely online![/quote
    [color=#00ff00]
    online universities are very popular but there are no online schools for basic nurse education the masters program cited is for already licensed nurses.
    Last edit by Ginger's Mom on Mar 2, '12 : Reason: adding content
  4. 0
    rn is required for us work visa, lpn won't help with that, also lpn training is not classified as academic in the us so you won't get credit toward rn academic credit requirements but many nursing schools want to encourage lpns to step up to rn and give some admission preference to lpns who hold a license in the us. the problem is you won't be able to move to the us to get the lpn license.

    [color=#00ff00]
    that is not true, many asn programs give credit for the lpn even foreign trained.
    can you name a few us based asn programs that give academic credit for foreign lpn training? all the 2 year associate degree programs for rns that i looked at do not accept lpn education as academic credits, either foreign or us: brookdale and ocean county community colleges in nj and broward and a couple other public colleges in florida did not give academic credits for lpn coursework. i'd love to know which accredited us colleges do give credits for lpn coursework.



    my advice is that if you are interested in working in the us go straight for the rn, it's really only 12-18 months more academic work and you absolutely need it for us visa. there is a huge pay difference between lpn and rn here in the us, you would recover all your additional schooling costs the very first year you worked in the us. an lpn might start at $15/hr here and an rn $25-30/hr but the rn pay scale moves up farther and faster than pln, the lpn is what we call a "dead end" job here, no logical progressions to move up. employers continue to invest money in additional training and education in their rns here.

    [color=#00ff00]

    where is there an academic program for bsn that is only 12 months to 18 months more than a lpn
    ?
    [color=#00ff00]
    lpn is one year and bsn is 4 years . i don't know where you are getting the information about lpns, while job choices are more limited, lpns get the same continuing education as rns, and the pay between lpns and rns in skilled nursing ( where most adns are finding employment ) is nearly the same.
    a bachelors degree (bsn) is generally 4 years and is not required to sit for the neclex rn exam but i never said a bachelors program, there are many associates degree programs in the us that allow grads to sit for the rn. these associates degree programs generally take 2-3 years. an lpn training program takes a full year, full time in the us, that's 12 months. an associates program to qualify for the rn exam is 24 to 36 months, so that's 12 to 24 months more time than an lpn.

    according to the us dept of labor the average (not entry) pay for an rn is $32/hr, and lpn is $19/hr or about 70% higher.

    you can get a good rn education in the phils for a fraction of the us cost, follow up your phils rn education with a good neclex prep course and you're on your way. there may be more sophisticated rn training in the us but once you get here you will receive additional training from your employer that will cover any shortcomings there.
    [color=#00ff00]


    new grad programs are very competitive to get in to, plus going to school in the usa there are opportunities to network. the failure rate for foreign graduates on the nclex is over 70%.
    the nclex pass rate is lower for foreign students, english is not their first language and even though the science is the same there are cultural differences, taking a good intensive prep course produces better nclex test results. many us students taking professional challenge exams "cram" for the exams with prep courses. good test taking skills are an essential part of successfully challenging professional exams especially in the us with it's emphasis on multiple choice questions.


    ps online nursing education is gaining credibility here in the us - for example georgetown university one of the very best universities in the us now has a masters degree in nursing that is largely online![/quote. online college education is gaining credibility in the us but there are aspects of nursing study that require labs and "hands on" experience. the fact that
    [color=#00ff00]

    online universities are very popular but there are no online schools for basic nurse education the masters program cited is for already licensed nurses.

    online college education has gained credibility in the us but there are aspects of nursing study that require labs and "hands on" experience.
    [color=#00ff00]


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    can you name a few us based asn programs that give academic credit for foreign lpn training? all the 2 year associate degree programs for rns that i looked at do not accept lpn education as academic credits, either foreign or us: brookdale and ocean county community colleges in nj and broward and a couple other public colleges in florida did not give academic credits for lpn coursework. i'd love to know which accredited us colleges do give credits for lpn coursework.

    http://www.massbay.edu/uploadedfiles...s_07_06_11.pdf


    http://www.rcc.mass.edu/nursing/admi...mation_000.pdf

    here are two that i have known foreign graduates to complete the lpn to rn programs. both are accredited.


    bachelors degree (bsn) is generally 4 years and is not required to sit for the neclex rn exam but i never said a bachelors program, there are many associates degree programs in the us that allow grads to sit for the rn. these associates degree programs generally take 2-3 years. an lpn training program takes a full year, full time in the us, that's 12 months. an associates program to qualify for the rn exam is 24 to 36 months, so that's 12 to 24 months more time than an lpn.




    roxbury community college is 42 weeks and other programs are less. while a bsn in not required to sit for nclex, it is required for immigration purposes as well as licensing purposes. to sit for the nclex -rn you must complete the program that is required in that country to sit for the professional level exam ( you have to be eligible for licensing in that country) last i heard that a bsn is required in the philp. not an asn.




    online college education has gained credibility in the us but there are aspects of nursing study that require labs and "hands on" experience.


    [color=#00ff00]
    that is true for a basic licensing program but not true for secondary degrees such as rn-bsn, bsn- msn.


    basically this program may not save anyone money. many boards of nursing are looking at the concurrent issue for basic programs. furthermore the website for this school implies that they are accredited by the nln and they are not, and i don't know how the graduates get around the fact they are not qualified to take the lpn or rn test due to the fact their home country does not recognize this level of education.

    "the request for validation of license/registration/diploma form
    you need to request validations for your current and initial license/registration/diploma obtained outside the united states. to do this,
    download and send the request for validation of license/registration/diploma from your online account. please check before sending
    that the applicant’s section reflects what you have entered in your application. the section at the bottom titled “for licensing
    authority to complete” is to be completed by the licensing authorities. if you have a diploma that authorized you to practice
    in your country, send this form to the institution that issued your diploma (for example, your school or the ministry of health) and
    request that an official copy of the diploma in the original language be sent to cgfns. if cgfns receive documents that are not in
    english without an english translation attached, we can have them translated for the fee listed on the fees page at http://www.cgfns.
    org/sections/apply/fees.shtml#5, at your request."
  6. 0
    Quote from rktbrkr
    You need to investigate the specifics of the California situation.

    Excelsior claims to have the largest nursing program in the US but I have never heard of them. There is a great demand in the US for RN education and some people seek to capitalize on this opportunity. Everyone should be very, very cautious evaluating a non-traditional college. Traditional colleges are those that are government supported, state, county or city or those with a religious tradition - most of the "name" universities in the US.

    Excelsior College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "Buyer beware"
    My sister-in-law is a Excelsior grad, she cannot get her RN license endorsed over from AZ to CA nor can several of her classmates. She has been a working RN for almost 3 1/2 years, like the others. Here's the information from the CA BON site.

    Board of Registered Nursing - Excelsior College


    Any and all nation-wide Excelsior grads from Jan. 2007 are not able to get their CA license, based on Excelsior's not having their clinicals and theory courses running concurrent in the same semester. This has been the case since 2006. However, this does not apply to those Excelsior grads who graduated from a certain year, I think, 2003, there are still able to apply for and into CA and yes, the CA BON is able to backdate their denials to those after 2003 year grads. Sad but true.

    I think that Maryland also is not accepting any Excelsior grads and there are many other states that requires a lot of extra hours in a clinical setting before they are allowed to take the exam. Check Excelsior's site itself, there used to be some kind of disclaimer of which state requires any Excelsior grads to do so.
    Last edit by sallyp911 on Mar 2, '12 : Reason: added info
  7. 0
    Can you name a few US based ASN programs that give academic credit for foreign LPN training? All the 2 year associate degree programs for RNs that I looked at do not accept LPN education as academic credits, either foreign or US: Brookdale and Ocean County Community colleges in NJ and Broward and a couple other public colleges in Florida did not give academic credits for LPN coursework. I'd love to know which accredited US colleges do give credits for LPN coursework.

    http://www.massbay.edu/uploadedFiles...s_07_06_11.pdf


    http://www.rcc.mass.edu/nursing/Admi...mation_000.pdf

    Here are two that I have known foreign graduates to complete the LPN To RN programs. Both are accredited.

    Thanks for making my point, Massbay requires 77 credits for it's LPN transitional program and the same number of credits for it's conventional associates program for RN, the training taken to become an LPN doesn't reduce the academic requirements to sit for the RN
  8. 0
    Thanks for making my point, Massbay requires 77 credits for it's LPN transitional program and the same number of credits for it's conventional associates program for RN, the training taken to become an LPN doesn't reduce the academic requirements to sit for the RN

    Of course the LPN-RN program has to meet the same requirements, most PN programs include college level English, A &P, Micro , etc. The advanced placement programs do not require the LPNs to repeat courses they have previously passed. Why would you think the LPNs don't have to take the same courses as the RNs? There is no credit for on the job training.

  9. 0
    on their website, license issed in 2011

    [color=#333333]
  10. 0
    Quote from rktbrkr
    on their website, license issed in 2011

    [color=#333333]

    wrong license

    prc official website - our services: verification of professional licenses


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