General Discussion about Filipino RNs currently working in the U.S. - page 6

for filipino rns currently in the us whether still undergoing the proper documentations or already working please kindly share your experiences on this thread. topics maybe from experiences at the... Read More

  1. by   bisayaispisyal
    Quote from pinoyRN_23
    just took and luckily passed my nclex-rn exam for the first time...now i dont know which area to choose..what areas could you suggest taht is not that stressful?i love psyche but they only have 8 hour shifts ..i need 12 hr shifts so taht i could apply for 2 full time jobs...i am thinkin of ER and NICU but im not that confident yet if i can handle it well?

    any advice ???
    congrats!!!! considering that its your first, i would go for med-surg. it has everything...psyche included. im on a respiratory/med surg floor. respiratory is our main area which could be tough too. anyways, when i first got here, i was thinking right away of getting a second job once i passed my nclex but eventually changed my mind as soon as i started working as RN. why? yep, the stress....even if i worked 12 hr shifts (and getting 4 days off at that), i dont think i can handle the extra stress on top of the regular stress at my first hospital..so i was thinking to get as much rest and relaxation as i can during my off days, otherwise, i would get burned out quick! but if you really wanna go for a second job, maybe you would think working in a non hospital setting (hopefully, there's lesser stress).

    good luck!

    :spin:
  2. by   seeandwhy
    I came in the US 3 yrs ago. I started to work in a Med-Sug floor. T'was really busy as in BUSY. In the Phils, I used to work in a District Hosp wherein there was 1 MD, 1-2 RN, 1 aid and the security guard for the entire 50-bed hospital. I thought that was tough coz we were incharged for all the wards including ER,DR,etc. But I tell you, nothing compares than the stress here in the US. Patients are legally conscious - believe it or not, there are patients that are waiting for you to make mistakes so that they can make money. Med-surg is truly a tough floor but it is the best training ground especially for foreign grad nurses like us. I already moved out to a specialty floor but I can say that I had a strong nursing foundation bec of that med-surg experience. My first evaluation from my new floor is "exceptional" and I always receive commendation from my manager.Barely 3 years here, I think I accomplished alot - I got my car exactly 2 months since I arrived,bought my own house as soon as I turned 1 year, had another baby, my children who are in elementary had won several chess competions not only from our city but statewide and had been invited several times in other states but we refused-it is not our priority. I used to work as a PRN in another hospital. I worked there at least once a week, the extra money I got from there were the money I sent back home to my family in the Phils. It was difficult at first bec primarily is the language barrier and they use a different computer system but nursing care is the same, just ask other staffs for their policies if in case you have doubts. I was able to do that for 1 year. i already quit coz I just satisfied my curiousity of how it is to work w/ a second job and in another hospital. But I really gained a lot from that, not to mention I was able to buy some properties for my parents,etc. I also had tried to go to school in a big university (again, for curiousity's sake). This one was kinda tougher because t'was a traditional class that meets twice a week for 3 hours per session. I took the "American Film" class just to see how is it to be a student in the US. My classmates were really young, single, college students, full of life, most were full-time students. I was able to pass the class but my conclusion was that it was a misadventure. Now, that I am 3 years, my goal this time is to be able to take the NP or the Advance Nursing Practice Exam because I had my MSN in the Phils but I think I still need to take a couple more subjects to qualify me to sit for the certification. To be honest, since I arrived here until this point in time, my mentality is to take advantage of whatever america can offer me because I plan not to stay here for good instead I am preparing myself in all aspects specially financially for an early retirement then go back home to share what I had gained here in the US to the Filipino nurses and future nurses that wants to work here in the US.
  3. by   lawrence01
    Thanks for sharing. :spin: Pls. feel free to share some more of your experiences here at anytime.
  4. by   sabadao22
    Hello Guys!! im Also an RN here in the philippines and will be coming soon in the US after this retrogression i'll be working in OR..just want to ask if experience is a big factor before going to US?....or its okey if you have limited experience will they train you when your already in their facility?
  5. by   RNHawaii34
    Quote from sabadao22
    hello guys!! im also an rn here in the philippines and will be coming soon in the us after this retrogression i'll be working in or..just want to ask if experience is a big factor before going to us?....or its okey if you have limited experience will they train you when your already in their facility?
    it is always okay to have an experience, but if you want to work in the u.s., it is not really required to have one because even if you are already well experienced in the philippines, your future employer will orient you to your choosen dept. in the philippines, we call it training,( which most rns there now have to pay for that training...) however, in the u.s., they will "orient" you for a long period of time, and you are getting paid, and also your license is on the line, including the person who is orienting you. in most places, they will let you work in a medical-department first for maybe a year or two, then you can transfer in different department, such as in o.r. goodluck to you!!
  6. by   sabadao22
    Wow that's good news for me..thanks for your reply have a nice day....
  7. by   juan de la cruz
    Hi seeandwhy! what an awesome success story! I wish you more success professionally and happines with your family and personal life. I noticed you indicated a desire to become an advanced practice nurse and you specifically mentioned NP. I am a nurse practitioner myself and have been for the last 2 1/2 years. I studied for my MSN here in the US with acute care nurse practitioner specialization. If you already have an MSN (which I assume you obtained from the Philippines), I would ask around college of nursing campuses around your area and see if you can qualify for a post-master's certificate NP program. The MSN obtained in the Philippines does not meet clinical practice requirements to sit for the NP certification exam here in the US. That is the reason for having to take a post-master's NP program. These programs can run 1-2 years depending on the school. By the way, what NP specilaty are you interested in?
  8. by   seeandwhy
    Hi Pinoy NP! Glad to hear from you. I got my MSN adult Nursing in the Phils and I wanted to pursue the Acute Care or Primary Care NP. I already consulted with the admission office and the int'l credentialing service on the university that I intend to apply. So far,you are absolutely right, they told me that I should apply for the post-grad certification and in order for me to sit for the ANCC certification for Advance Nursing Practice, I should take the Advance Pharmacotherapeutics and the Advance Health Assessment. Informally, they said that all my subjects/grades in my transcripts were credited. My only hindrance right now is the preparation of my application porfolio because it seems that it is so tedious specially that most of my credetials would still come directly from overseas. I needed 3 references/recommendation letters, my statement letter, OTRs including high school, etc. The deadline for Fall application is next week but they are giving me some consideration since I am an employee of their university hospital and I'll go for the post-grad. At this point in time, I am a bit confused if I should really push through studying in State University or maybe enroll in the University of Phoenix instead. Maybe their requirements are lesser - I don't know. Just that... to find a job as an NP is very competitive, therefore, it has a better edge to graduate in a State University under the tradional classroom style than to graduate from an online school. I really do not know how valid is my opinion, I confused right now. See if you can help me out decide, ok. I'll appreciate it. -
  9. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from seeandwhy
    Hi Pinoy NP! Glad to hear from you. I got my MSN adult Nursing in the Phils and I wanted to pursue the Acute Care or Primary Care NP. I already consulted with the admission office and the int'l credentialing service on the university that I intend to apply. So far,you are absolutely right, they told me that I should apply for the post-grad certification and in order for me to sit for the ANCC certification for Advance Nursing Practice, I should take the Advance Pharmacotherapeutics and the Advance Health Assessment. Informally, they said that all my subjects/grades in my transcripts were credited. My only hindrance right now is the preparation of my application porfolio because it seems that it is so tedious specially that most of my credetials would still come directly from overseas. I needed 3 references/recommendation letters, my statement letter, OTRs including high school, etc. The deadline for Fall application is next week but they are giving me some consideration since I am an employee of their university hospital and I'll go for the post-grad. At this point in time, I am a bit confused if I should really push through studying in State University or maybe enroll in the University of Phoenix instead. Maybe their requirements are lesser - I don't know. Just that... to find a job as an NP is very competitive, therefore, it has a better edge to graduate in a State University under the tradional classroom style than to graduate from an online school. I really do not know how valid is my opinion, I confused right now. See if you can help me out decide, ok. I'll appreciate it. -
    First, I encourage you to visit the advanced practice nursing forum for NP's in this website. There is so much information in there that you can learn from as you prepare for your quest in pursuing the NP role.

    I am also advising you that before you decide on choosing Primary Care NP vs Acute Care NP, research the job market in your area first and see which types of NP's have a better chance of getting employed. Acute Care NP's are trained to work in acute care settings specifically ICU's, medical and surgical units in hospitals, and other types of in-patient facilities. Most ACNP's are hired in specialty practices such as cardiology, neurosurgery, nephrology, pulmonary medicine, etc.

    On the other hand, Primary Care NP's are trained to care for adults in out-patient settings to provide primary care services. Depending on which area of the country you are in, there is some overlap in the roles between the two types of NP's. Where I live, many NP openings are in hospitals and specialty practices so it is more likely that an ACNP will get a job right away compared to a Primary Care NP in this particular area of the country.

    Yes, the application process is tedious but that is the only way the university can determine that you are qualified to enroll in their program. Fortunately for me, I did not have much problems having my official TOR sent by the university I attended in the Philippines to the university I was applying in here in the US. I did not have problems with recommendation letters as well since I worked with NP's in the hospital and they were gracious enough to help me with recommendation letters. I did spend a lot of time polishing my graduate school goal statement to make my application stand out. I was also required to take the GRE which I noticed you did not mention at all so I am assuming this is not required of you. And would you believe I also had to present my CGFNS certificate!

    I attended a state university too and it is affiliated with a major medical center in the area. A major advantage of attending state universities is that you are eligible for cheaper in-state tuition rates as a resident of the state you are in. Private schools such as University of Phoenix can be very expensive. I also am not aware if U. of Phoenix has an NP track so you may be wasting your time attending their MSN program if it just leads to a generic MSN with no NP focus. Why would you have to do that when you already have an MSN degree.

    Take your time to gather all the requirements in a school that you feel will provide you with a good clinical learning environment and excellent training in your chosen NP field. If you can't make it for fall registration, will the school allow you to regsiter in the winter instead? I actually took my time in making sure I have all the required documents because I was set on attending the school I preferred the most. I do not regret doing that at all.
  10. by   seeandwhy
    PinoyNP, thanks for the inspiration! I feel like I am re-charged again. I will follow your advice. I had talked to the admission counselor from U. Phoenix yesterday and their program is not for me. So what's in your goal statement? I am planning to draft this week, hope I can send it to you via personal email so that you can edit and critic it and hopefully give me some advice. This goal statement seem to be so huge - it scares me specially that I am not a writer. Anyway, thanks for answering my questions, you are clearing my mind. Now, at least, I got a better view of what I wanted to be and the choices I have. You are such an inspiration! That is what I need...
  11. by   juan de la cruz
    No problem, seeandwhy. PM me anytime for anything.
  12. by   king2000usa
    Wow, great forum! I plan to move to the philippines this year to take up nursing--long story but I just want to get away from distractions--but I have concerns and questions. First, how soon can I apply for the NCLEX upon graduation and do I apply in the Phil or go directly to California and apply there? Should I stay in the Phil while waiting for the application and transcripts to go through? How long is the wait? What steps can I take to limit delays? And lastly, in picking Philippine nursing colleges to go, does their ranking in the local board passing rate comparable to the passing rate to the NCLEX?
  13. by   lawrence01
    Quote from king2000usa
    Wow, great forum! I plan to move to the philippines this year to take up nursing--long story but I just want to get away from distractions--but I have concerns and questions. First, how soon can I apply for the NCLEX upon graduation and do I apply in the Phil or go directly to California and apply there? Should I stay in the Phil while waiting for the application and transcripts to go through? How long is the wait? What steps can I take to limit delays? And lastly, in picking Philippine nursing colleges to go, does their ranking in the local board passing rate comparable to the passing rate to the NCLEX?
    If you are not a Filipino Citizen, you are not obliged to take the local boards and can apply directly to take the NCLEX. Of course, you have to do all the paperworks while still in the Phil. Some Filipino graduates don't even bother to take the local boards as well if they plan to work in the US.

    The nursing program is a 4 yr BSN program though.

    In my opinion, ranking for local boards passing rate does not translate w/ passing the NCLEX.

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