General Discussion about Filipino RNs currently working in the U.S. - page 11

for filipino rns currently in the us whether still undergoing the proper documentations or already working please kindly share your experiences on this thread. topics maybe from experiences at the... Read More

  1. by   tagamargos
    Quote from misty888
    great and enlightening posts. would like to ask for advice though which is more practical - bring the kids along (ages 6 and 8) or give myself time first to adjust first.


    Great thread, Why didn't Lawrence post this 5 years ago? :chuckle It would have helped me, I had to learn it the hard way :chuckle

    Anyway,

    when i came here, It was only me and my husband first, we are sort of "trying the new water" first, so I can concentrate on my new job, and he can concentrate on looking for a job (hey, I'm smart! got to let them work!) My kids followed after six months (she was 7 and he was 4) , but, boy those were the hardest 6 months of my life! Spent too much money on long distance calls to p.i. and end up getting eyebugs for crying too much (you get the picture),

    Then, we enrolled them to school as soon as possible (my 4 yr old got accepted because he is what they call ESL (english as a second language) otherwise, if your kids are born here, they won't accept them until they are 5 or 6? I'm not sure. They can always put them in daycare but they are very expensive. The kids adjust really quick. I remember my son only know "yes" and "no" for english, after a few months, he has to think had na to talk in our language.

    6moths fast forward, me and my husband are having a difficult time adjusting our schedule (we only had one car then) he has to hurry home so I can leave for work (7p)....so he decided to leave his work as a security officer (which he only received base pay of $5.15, no insurance, no benefits, hey I was glad he decided to leave) and just be a homebody so "he can take care of the kids".....fast forward few months, my husband got crazy with DEPRESSION (my diagnosis, anyway, he was in denial ) being at home most of the time, nothing to do drove him crazy. We were always arguing (BEWARE: a big part of your adjustment is the spouse that's left at home to take care of the kids, esp when they had a totally different role back home)

    THen my husband decided to go to nursing school thinking it is one job you can have good pay, and where you can find job in most place you go.

    So now, we're both working as nurses... end of story.:hatparty:


    You have to weigh all the advantages and disadvantages of bringing your kids with you. If you have a spouse that is already taking care of your kids in the Phil full time, then I guess it's okay, because he/she is already used to that role. BUT if you have a reversal of role when you come to migrate, PLEASE always remember it's a BIG adjustment for BOTH of you.
  2. by   tagamargos
    Quote from sabadao22
    Hello Guys!! im Also an RN here in the philippines and will be coming soon in the US after this retrogression i'll be working in OR..just want to ask if experience is a big factor before going to US?....or its okey if you have limited experience will they train you when your already in their facility?

    Having an experience in Phil before coming here is an added bonus, if you have it, fine, if you don't, still okay because they will train you. They treat foreign hired nurses as new grads in this hospital) I had 2 months orientation in a MedSurg-Oncology floor. It was not a bad transition for me because I started off as a PCA (nurse aide) and Unit secretary while waiting to take my licensure exam. When I oriented as a nurse, they give us a whole week of general orientation, what the hospital's mission, policies, all those good stuff (free lunch and paid hours ) and how their computer system works. nursing stuff like medication dosage calculations and the equipments that we as nurses use (IV pumps, PCA (patient controlled analgesia machine) glucometers, etc.

    On the floor I was assigned to a Filipino nurse for a preceptor which really helped a lot, language/cultural barriers are eliminated. They give you patients starting with one, and gradually increasing till you take the full load (6-7 patients in my case).

    I got a new graduate nurse rate on this hospital, so when when my contract was done 2 years after, a converted into PRN (no benefit, pays better, more flexible schedule) and got a full time job in another hospital which jumped up my salary to $7 more/hr.

    Then when we moved to the bigger city of Houston, I found a hospital that credited half of my total Phil experience (10yrs experience in Phil, credited my for 5yrs here, so I got a very good offer) They just asked a copy of my job certificate from back home. And the work condition is way better than the remote city of McAllen. Here, on this hospital, their nurse patient ratio is 1:4 in MEDSURG! At first I did not belive it but it's true. So i grabbed the opportunity and still works here today. Of course I've moved to a specialty unit, but another story.

    If you have experience on the Phil. make sure you get a job certificate and hang on to them, you'll never know you'll use it some day.
  3. by   breech
    wow! that's a nice experience
  4. by   pointeblanc23
    this thread is really amazing... i'm definitely learning something...:spin:
    i'm also working here in the PHil as an ICU nurse about 8 mos now and hopefully, work there in the US when this retrogression will be lifted. although, i have no idea yet where will i be working. i mean hospital wise. Will there be a big possibility that i'd still be working as an ICU nurse when i reach US? or will everyone start as a floor nurse again? Please do enlighten me.
  5. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from pointeblanc23
    this thread is really amazing... i'm definitely learning something...:spin:
    i'm also working here in the PHil as an ICU nurse about 8 mos now and hopefully, work there in the US when this retrogression will be lifted. although, i have no idea yet where will i be working. i mean hospital wise. Will there be a big possibility that i'd still be working as an ICU nurse when i reach US? or will everyone start as a floor nurse again? Please do enlighten me.
    It will depend on what openings are available for you when you finally find an employer to sponsor you. ICU nurse vacancies are very desirable and usually fill up faster than floor positions. A lot of the floor nurses in any particular hospital usually apply for these openings and are given priority over outside applicants. I was an ICU nurse in the Philppines but when I arrived in the US in the mid-90's most of the RN openings were in long-term care as hospitals were not hiring as much. I had to work in LTC for a while before I was able to get my foot in the door at a hospital and I did not even work in ICU at first - I was hired in a step-down unit first. But of course, there are anecdotal accounts that tend to be an exception to this rule. The SICU I currently work in as an NP hired 2 foreign nurses (from India) early last year and they were started in ICU immediately. They both have ICU experience in India. I personally do not agree with the practice as it took these guys longer to get accustomed to the US hospital setting alone, so the US ICU setting was too much of a challenge to them.
    Last edit by juan de la cruz on May 17, '07
  6. by   nurseshrek
    I've been working in the U.S for a year and 3 months now, on my part, 2 days after I got here in California, I started working already,only 2 days of orientation,i was already on my own, dealing with CNA's is the first challenge to me, and its was not that easy.I was living in a house provided by the employer with no heater so I have to provide myself a portable heater and heavy blankets.Ate canned foods for 2 weeks.The company that I got into are not very supportive to their newly hired nurses,so just a piece of advise,come prepared,mentally and physically when you come to the US to work,
    Now after more than a year,life is gettin better,9 more months with my present employer and I would be free to apply to hospitals that I wish to work with.(Im on a 2 year contract right now.
  7. by   pointeblanc23
    Quote from pinoyNP
    It will depend on what openings are available for you when you finally find an employer to sponsor you. ICU nurse vacancies are very desirable and usually fill up faster than floor positions. A lot of the floor nurses in any particular hospital usually apply for these openings and are given priority over outside applicants. I was an ICU nurse in the Philppines but when I arrived in the US in the mid-90's most of the RN openings were in long-term care as hospitals were not hiring as much. I had to work in LTC for a while before I was able to get my foot in the door at a hospital and I did not even work in ICU at first - I was hired in a step-down unit first. But of course, there are anecdotal accounts that tend to be an exception to this rule. The SICU I currently work in as an NP hired 2 foreign nurses (from India) early last year and they were started in ICU immediately. They both have ICU experience in India. I personally do not agree with the practice as it took these guys longer to get accustomed to the US hospital setting alone, so the US ICU setting was too much of a challenge to them.
    Thanks alot. I was just a bit worried with the patient loads. Although i started with a maximum of 15 patients before when i was a floor nurse but having more experiences in the ICU with a 1:1 of nurseatient ratio, i fear of not being able to juggle with 6-8 patient loads or that i may not be able to deliver the best care the patients are entitled to have.
  8. by   Tricia07
    Thank you all for the inputs...
  9. by   narutoidol
    wow, its great thread with a lot of inputs that i need to know about.Guys, i want to ask, if you're a new r.n in the U.S esp. in Ca, working only 1 job for the moment, maybe 6 months or a year and of course, single.:chuckle Will Your income will be enough for the basic needs living in the California.
    I am newly R.N here in PI, without hosp. exp.,and planning to take nclex this coming Oct. 18, 2007.I am so much greatful for this thread, for the usedful info.Basically, i'm not confident regarding my skills.So my next question, does your training here in PI, really matter a lot in the U.S Hosp.
    Here, i'm able to attend a lot of free seminars conducted By various agency, some agency may say, at least a year or more, but other may say, no need to have an exp.,as they say, they will train you in the u.s. with pay 10dolars/hour for 3 months in california.
    Of course, im not tied up, as of now in any agency.i just loved to attend there seminars and eat ther free snacks( candy).:icon_cheesygrin:
    Right now, i am cgfns certified, 4 months and 18 days from now,i will take my nclex exam.
    Hoping you could share your ideas....
  10. by   aeonflux14
    To all Filipino Nurses in US or in any other country,

    Can you please share any valuable lesson learned from your migration.
    Please share so that nurses who are about to go outside the country can prepare.
    All of lesson shared will be greatly appreciated.
  11. by   ricemilk
    Quote from Rep
    Let us start on the first step of the journey. On the first plane ride to the US.

    Remember, that we were instructed to bring along our x-rays from St Lukes. I believe most of us had bought the square plastic bag outside of St Lukes. I bought mine there. Well, you can just put it in your handcarry luggage, just fold the top portion of the envelope and it will fit right in your handcarry luggage. If you brought the square plastic, yiou will stand in the crowd as a first time immigrant and sometimes in gets in the way when you are carrying your hand luggage. The US customs will not ask for it when you arrive at the port of entry. They will only ask for the folder which the US embassy provided to us. Believe me.

    Also, we Filipinos are so fond of bringing extra foods which we want to eat when we travel. My experience was my wife brought a lot of biscuits for our snacks and we did not touch any because during our travel, lot of foods/snack were offered to us during our plane ride and upon disembarking, we have to declare to US Customs that we were bringing some foods from the Philippines. The US customs will ask you that when you arrive at the port of entry regarding food, if you have any contact with plants, farm animals, etc.

    Be also ready about informations about your employer, your address in the US and other things related to your immigration. They will ask you that. Sometimes, they will ask how much money are you bringing in. They asked me that.

    If they asked some questions, just answer with a simple answer.

    My experience was smooth, they asked about my employer, they ask about my children and asked them some question regarding their birthdate .

    After they stamped your passport, the US Customs officer will say which you have been waiting ofr a long time to hear. " Welcome to the United States of America!"
    I really find this thread helpful. Thanks to those who spearheaded this. I have a lot of friends who had gone to US ahead of me but I havent been told of this. Maybe because they're also busy with their new job and had to adjust to a new culture that they forgot to share this important thing.

    Keep up the great work! God bless!
  12. by   silence01
    Pardon me for posting this hypothetical question/scenario (though hypothetical, it may gain a grain of truth depending on your response). I've already met the requirements (passing the cgfns exam, English proficiency test) enough for me to start processing my visa. I've met this Recruitment Company and employer (I believe it to be reputable) to help me ease the tedious paper and legal works for my immigration. From then on I started to get confused. I hate to discuss this with anyone it's some kind of private stuff. Haha. But since I'm zero knowledge on what's the right thing to do, I guess it would be helpful if I share this to people whom I believe had the same or at least a little grasp of my situation like you guys........ I'm single at this moment. And I'm planning to get married before I leave Pinas (if things work well for me) but I have second thought whether or not I'll push on with my plan for the following simple yet disturbing reasons:

    I'm not certain if I'm going to restart the process of getting my visa in case I get married. My status in all the documents I submitted is "single" and I'm afraid getting married would affect my time table which I believe it's already just a stone-throw away before the release of my visa. My partner and I had discussed this matter already and we both agreed that it would be unwise if I restart the whole process (of securing my visa).

    Another option we have is to get married after I finally have my visa or after absorption at the facility of my employment. Maybe after working a couple of months or a year, I'll go back home and settle. The only problem with this option is the huge and precious time that we'll be losing. I hate to say this, but we're running out of time to start a family (Yeah, I'm serious). If we gonna stick with the latter option, that would mean I would wait a longer time before I could get my partner with me. I've learned that getting a spousal visa usually takes at least two years since I'm not eligible to file a petition for a K1 or K3 Visa.......

    Guys, please be generous of your time to give me an advice. You might have other way there. I might just isolating my mind to these limited options I have. So if you guys have something there please do share. My goal is simply how my partner and I could get and start a family in US the soonest time. I really want to bring her with me the soonest time. Thanks!
  13. by   RNHawaii34
    Quote from aeonflux14
    to all filipino nurses in us or in any other country,

    can you please share any valuable lesson learned from your migration.
    please share so that nurses who are about to go outside the country can prepare.
    all of lesson shared will be greatly appreciated.
    valuable lessons...i think i had too many. but first, you need to have a lot of patience..you need to have an open mind and the willingness to learn new things. a simple "please", and "thank you" will make your life a lot easier. learn to respect other people's opinion even if you disagree with them. if you don't understand things, never hesitate to ask, don't pretend you know everything. at work, respect the people you work with, even if you don't like them. always try to learn new things. read, read, read. america is such a big country, with a lot of people from different backgrounds. people who live here are not only black or whites. always be careful of what you say, because some of the english language we used back home may not be "polite" or acceptable here in usa. every immigrants have different experience, whether they are from pi or from other countries. you may feel awkward, uncomfortable at the beginning, but eventually you will catch on. i think it will help you a lot when you start reading, searching infos. about the place you are going to before you get out of the philippines. like me for instance, coming here 15 years ago, i had a bigtime culture shock! i had no clues of what state of hawaii would be like, i always thought people here are all whites, and nobody eats rice....and there will be snow all year long, to my dismay, i see many asians, mixed with whites, and other beautiful people of different descent ( japanese, chinese, irish, portoguese, french, italians, africans, you name it,), what a paradise!! and i had such a great time, thus, made me decide to stay here in the aisle up to now. language wise, i had a hardtime at the start, because they have different accent compare to the ones' i saw and hear on tv. going in other part of the country, such as eastcoast, and westcoast, they have different dictions or accents too. what i love the most is visiting the southern usa because they have pretty southern accents..the bottomline? practice proper english, get a grammar book, read a respectable newspaper, or books, try not to use slangs, ( trust me, it's not funny). the most important thing that i learned during my first few years hear in the us? just be yourself, and everything will be ok. sorry for being so offtopic here .
    p.s., it will help also if you read the geography, and brief history of the usa.

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