any FILIPINO members here? - page 5

hi!!im also a filipino and im here in the Philippines..just to know some filipino members and to ask tips from them on how they were employed in the US...im currently working as a nurse specialist in... Read More

  1. by   nrswnabee
    Quote from chlyxenne
    everybody would say it was a smart step i took... i was in medschool for a sem before i got into nursing. if i continued med, i should be graduating march2006, but then that's not the end yet... so i thought id go for nursing instead..

    so i had my credentials assessed in a local university in our province and i enrolled.. their course is ladderized.. i got into Level II first and so I got my Associate Degree from there (AHSE).. then Level III & IV, got my BSN diploma and took the board, now i have my RN license.

    true, it's cheaper.. but you cant always be assured of the training. i can say our training was just average.. hospitals here are do not have all the modern equipment.. but it was ok.. we had affiliations to some bigger hospitals in manila but that only ran for 4 weeks. it wasnt bad though.. at least..

    but then of course, you get the perks of having your BSN, plus ur license here (just in case) plus an associate degree (in case i wanna teach), add to that of course my previous BS Biology degree.. making it three all in all.. at least if nursing doesnt work (god forbid), i can have fallback options :chuckle
    hi! i'm gonna second everyone else who told you it's a smart move...practically. i just hope though that your heart's also into it. i must say that i am not really crazy about becoming a nurse myself but from what i see, it could be a means to becoming more. nursing has various specialties. (i'm actually thinking about what i can look forward to doing next, after floor duties...and i haven't even started clinicals!!! hehehe)... so that makes the career multi-faceted.

    at first i find it disheartening that many pinoy doctors are going back to school to become nurses. but you know, if you get to the heart of their reasons, it's basically because they value their families more than their personal ambition. the us has more opportunities for nurses than doctors. the situation for doctors isn't as rosy... malpractice suits are mounting and of course you are up against competition head on with other doctors born and trained here from the time you take the usmle, find residency and establishing practice. patients would understandably prefer doctors they can relate to ..you know, accent and all. it's something we can't really avoid...it will probably take a long time for all these to change.

    regarding training, i guess, with this career, no one's "fully trained" before working. you learn as you go and i think, a lot of your learning differs from facility to facility or hospital to another...i think even if you didn't get the chance to have hands-on experience with up-to-date technology, it shouldn't be a big problem. it could be even an advantage because all the time, you've known what to do minus the machines...you've always been improvising without knowing it. sweet huh?

    okay then...appreciate the posts...keep 'em coming!
  2. by   pinoy_guy
    Quote from nrswnabee
    at first i find it disheartening that many pinoy doctors are going back to school to become nurses. but you know, if you get to the heart of their reasons, it's basically because they value their families more than their personal ambition.
    Very sad that doctors are finding it hard to provide for their families...
  3. by   nrswnabee
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    Very sad that doctors are finding it hard to provide for their families...
    yup..doctors becoming nurses has become quite a phenomenon in our dear country. but you know, i think this is part of the world becoming multicultural. maybe the nursing profession (teachers, too!!) is simply a way for pinoys to be integrated with the rest of the world...
  4. by   Catzy
    Quote from chlyxenne
    everybody would say it was a smart step i took... i was in medschool for a sem before i got into nursing. if i continued med, i should be graduating march2006, but then that's not the end yet... so i thought id go for nursing instead..

    so i had my credentials assessed in a local university in our province and i enrolled.. their course is ladderized.. i got into Level II first and so I got my Associate Degree from there (AHSE).. then Level III & IV, got my BSN diploma and took the board, now i have my RN license.

    true, it's cheaper.. but you cant always be assured of the training. i can say our training was just average.. hospitals here are do not have all the modern equipment.. but it was ok.. we had affiliations to some bigger hospitals in manila but that only ran for 4 weeks. it wasnt bad though.. at least..

    but then of course, you get the perks of having your BSN, plus ur license here (just in case) plus an associate degree (in case i wanna teach), add to that of course my previous BS Biology degree.. making it three all in all.. at least if nursing doesnt work (god forbid), i can have fallback options :chuckle
    I feel bad about the way you described your training experience in our country. I have been a registered nurse since 1986 and I graduated from one of our college of nursing, however, I would say that when I had my first job as a nurse I feel confident enough to do tha basic nursing tasks expected from a newly graduate nurse. Yes, I do realize that now a days, college of nursing is now turning into business. put up by greedy business people who only thinks of getting big fat money in return. Therefore, I would like to advise the Filipino people to look into the schools who are really have a good board exam result so that we could cripple these sub standard schools in our country.
  5. by   Catzy
    Quote from nrswnabee
    yup..doctors becoming nurses has become quite a phenomenon in our dear country. but you know, i think this is part of the world becoming multicultural. maybe the nursing profession (teachers, too!!) is simply a way for pinoys to be integrated with the rest of the world...
    Uh huh! I really do not totally agree that Filipino doctors are forced to take up nursing after getting their medical license just to provide for their family. In the first place, I think they had a very wrong motive in taking up medicine. What they wanted is really to earn big fat MONEY and get rich. So finally, they realized that doctors, especially newly graduate can not be rich overnight, just what they thought before, so they turned their back from their oath and went to nursing because they can see that there is a lot of opportunity for nurses to be rich especially abroad.

    What happens when they practice nursing? They thought that they are the boss because they know everything! They question every order of the doctors. I knew that as nurses, we are our client's advocate and have the right to question doctors to protect our clients/patients. But doctors turned nurses sometimes do it arrogantly. Ooops sorry, these are all based from my personal observations (I am not saying that this applies to everyone - doctors turned nurses).
  6. by   cheyeree


    Hi to Everyone,
    YES I'M proud to be A FILIPINO one of the worlds most caring NURSES im here in KSA and been working still processing my EB - 3 so to all we should always have FAITH in GOD and PRAY more blessings to come too. MAHALO to this SUPERB site and especially to SUZANNE 4 she keep helping everyone. HAPPY NEW YEAR

    :wink2: :Melody:
  7. by   chlyxenne
    Quote from nrswnabee
    yup..doctors becoming nurses has become quite a phenomenon in our dear country. but you know, i think this is part of the world becoming multicultural. maybe the nursing profession (teachers, too!!) is simply a way for pinoys to be integrated with the rest of the world...
    may i also say that many nursing students of today (second-degree coursers or not) take up nursing as a gatepass entry to US (or to any other country as a stepping stone to US).. haha i remember one friend of mine told me she's starting to hate that country (US) because everyody else is going there! :roll oh well, can we blame them in the first place?
  8. by   chlyxenne
    Quote from nrswnabee
    regarding training, i guess, with this career, no one's "fully trained" before working. you learn as you go and i think, a lot of your learning differs from facility to facility or hospital to another...i think even if you didn't get the chance to have hands-on experience with up-to-date technology, it shouldn't be a big problem. it could be even an advantage because all the time, you've known what to do minus the machines...you've always been improvising without knowing it. sweet huh?
    yeah, thats what i thought.. but some friends start to tell me we cant always bring the attitude we had here, no matter how creative we can be and make do with what-have-we's, not everyone can appreciate it.. they still go 'by the book' and i thing that's sad coz i myself dont believe everything written on paper.. good thing we get at least a month's training (as experieced by friends, i dunno if it goes the same for all US hospitals though) before you can finally "legally" work with them.

    we are told that the advantage of Filipino nurses over others is the "Pinoy" appeal.... if you're Pinoy you definitely know what I'm talking about.. so be proud! :kiss
  9. by   chlyxenne
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    Very sad that doctors are finding it hard to provide for their families...
    even lawyers, dentists, military men, seamen, and almost everybody else! i just learnt that one friend who is in the US now is coming back to the Philippines only to take up nursing.. (guess office jobs can't sustain the lifestyle they want eh..)

    they still say nursing is the best bet.. well i can be a rapper and make money! haha kidding
  10. by   chlyxenne
    Quote from Catzy
    I feel bad about the way you described your training experience in our country. I have been a registered nurse since 1986 and I graduated from one of our college of nursing, however, I would say that when I had my first job as a nurse I feel confident enough to do tha basic nursing tasks expected from a newly graduate nurse. Yes, I do realize that now a days, college of nursing is now turning into business. put up by greedy business people who only thinks of getting big fat money in return. Therefore, I would like to advise the Filipino people to look into the schools who are really have a good board exam result so that we could cripple these sub standard schools in our country.
    i entered nursing school in 2002, and that's 16 years after u became an RN. there had been tons of changes in the nursing curriculum. our CI's would tell us their horrifying experiences with their CI's back then. The discipline before is far different. You must have an overview of Pinoy culture today.. totally different from long ago. During my time, students would literally buy a thesis just to have a diploma. I bet those students are on the losing end though... the defeat the purpose of learning and loving the profession.

    however, many students these days are only after a diploma. other than the fact that even hospitals lack modern facilities and "good staff nurses," they just can't cater to the needs of student nurses for clinical experience because of the bulk of the student population. Sometimes, there can be 2 or 3 groups of students, 12 each, in one area per shift. sad to say but true, nursing education today is very different.. i'm talking about median schools... but even if i would prefer a more reputable institution to earn a diploma, it just won't be easy because many of them do not welcome 2nd degree coursers.. again, due to lack of facilities.
  11. by   chlyxenne
    Quote from Catzy
    Uh huh! I really do not totally agree that Filipino doctors are forced to take up nursing after getting their medical license just to provide for their family. In the first place, I think they had a very wrong motive in taking up medicine. What they wanted is really to earn big fat MONEY and get rich. So finally, they realized that doctors, especially newly graduate can not be rich overnight, just what they thought before, so they turned their back from their oath and went to nursing because they can see that there is a lot of opportunity for nurses to be rich especially abroad.

    What happens when they practice nursing? They thought that they are the boss because they know everything! They question every order of the doctors. I knew that as nurses, we are our client's advocate and have the right to question doctors to protect our clients/patients. But doctors turned nurses sometimes do it arrogantly. Ooops sorry, these are all based from my personal observations (I am not saying that this applies to everyone - doctors turned nurses).
    in my case, i grew up leaning to the "idea" that to be a doctor is the ultimate dream... i gave it a try but didn't really fell in love with it. i didn't fall in love with nursing as well, but as time passed i learned to live with it, and now, as an RN, i acknowledge the profession. i know i can make money, but sooner or later, i still wish i can do what i really wanted to do in the first place, without jeopardizing my RN license.

    bottomline, sometimes, it's not all about the money.. but it can be the sturdiest stepping stone to keep a certain lifestyle and save up for something you really want and reach for your ultimate dream..
  12. by   amerain
    Quote from lector
    HI Guy's Im lector a 2nd yr Nursing stud here in the Philippines........Im currently studying at the University of Southern Philippines Foundation-College of Nursing....

    Hope to knw you all!
    CIAO

    hi!! where is your school located??? nway,i'm a filipino,too.. a 2nd yr student-nurse studying in southwestern university...:spin:
  13. by   rpangeles
    Quote from nrswnabee
    -----

    so that explains it...before i came here to the us (i'm on a student visa pursuing nursing as a second career, hopefully), i asked up manila if they accept second degree seekers...yup, they don't...i wanted a school in manila so i ended up getting my credentials assessed in gen. emilio aguinaldo. but then again i never got to attend classes with geac, too. it's waaay cheaper to study in manila and what's great about it is you get a bsn after school. studying here in the states, you pay more than twice the resident's rate even with a community college. in my case, i can only afford an associates' degree. i will have to be an rn then think about getting hold of a bsn later. for all of you taking up nursing in the philippines...God bless! you are in the right track!!
    You have to agree that an ADN gotten here is much better than a BSN received in the Philippines as you don't have to go to the whole process of getting CGFNS, TOEFL and IELTS which really delays a nurse's move to the US. When you finish your ADN, all you have to worry about is getting through NCLEX and finding a job. I have observed that hospitals here donot give as much emphasis from where you graduated as much as they do in the Philippines. And with the shortage, an ADN is worth the same as a BSN.
    Don't get me wrong though, Filipinos are treasured in hospitals here due to the quality of care that they give. I have been through a nursing home and a medical center as part of my clinicals and in both sites Filipino nurses are holding positions of resposibility.

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