US nurses moving/moved to Canada - page 3

I have noticed reading over this forum that there are quite a few nurses here that have moved to Canada from the US, or are in the process. I am wondering, for those like me who are still trying to... Read More

  1. by   MTBanRN
    I heard something about 30 days would be the length of time then I heard it would be 2-3 months before you receive a license after applying for one. To be quite honest who knows but you can contact the Canadian Nurses Association and they will inform you of all that you need to know. Depending on where you move you may have to live there 30 days maybe that would be what they were referring to when they said it takes thirty days. Also I believe that it is the same if you were foreign moving to the US you must have employment first. Then they will issue a work permit. That is why it may be the same when going over to Canada. No I do not think they are less strict in the US I believe that there are those who just do not abide by regulations and do not get caught.
  2. by   oneLoneNurse
    Quote from mistoff
    I moved from Canada to New Mexico first in 1997 and requirements were a job confirmation, $56.00 and copy of your license to obtain a TN visa. I only needed to cross the border each year to have my Visa renewed.

    Since 1997, they have been talking about foreign nurses requiring the CGNSF validation. Well, as of July 2005, the CGNSF has been legislated as required for foreign nursing entry. That is why some people are being told it will now take 3-4 months.

    I have worked in the US for 8 years with a yearly visa. I went home to Canada for the summer and have moved back to New Mexico and the US immigration won't renew my TN unless I have the CGNSF. I called them which they are a credentially service that validates that foreign nurses have the equivilent education and English language skills of the US. They want $350.00 & you need to send them everything since high school for them to validate and provide you with the necessary visa screen now required for Canadians. They state it will take them 4-6 weeks to process this information

    For me the problem is that I was credential by another service a few years ago and in fact have finished my BSN nursing components in the US and am short 2 general electives to finish. CGNSF still requires me to pay them for the Visa screen

    I have a few weeks to decide what to do. I only live 20 minutes from the Mexican border so I am going to try to get the renewal without the CGNSF because I have also written NCLEX. This time I am applying for US Citizenship because I am unlikely to return again to Canada to nurse.

    The positive side--I have been an ED nurse for 20 years all over Canada and the US. The US provides you with better opportunities for advancement, better staffing, education funding etc. I went home for 8 months and decided I prefer US health care.

    Hope that helps.
    Jennifer

    Well, as of
    Have not written the NCLEX. Have been here since 1987. Working in computers since 1996. Good to see someone else in my situation. I have switched back into floor nursing to pass the NCLEX and am taking Kaplan. I agree with you about the opportunities here.
  3. by   RRlvr
    Matt,
    Do you have a BSN ? I am graduating this May with a ADN,RN and have been told that Ontario no longer will accept the associates and that BC is planning on following suit.
    Could I ask why you approached immigration the way you did ?? I may need to do something similar. Its that or the UK !
  4. by   nurse_ange1
    Hi Everyone,
    I'm a US citizen who did all of my schooling in Ontario, I graduated with a BScN in nursing (i.e.degree) and I took the CRNE (i.e. rn exam here) and then had to apply for a work permit ONCE I had a job offer. Luckily for me I lived in a border city so I could do everything in person vs. snailmail.... Below is some factual information that I hope helps.
    1) There is no longer RN associate degrees available in Canada in any province... as of Jan 2005 anyone wanting to be an RN has to have a bachelors in nurses...In canada, the liscesning is done by a National organization. There are some associate programs that have just finished, and they will be allowed to write, but there is no more intake into these programs. However, if you have many years of experience you MAY be able to write the exam, you would have to talk to the CNO (College of Nurses of Ontario). RPN (simular to LPN) is a 2 year associates degree, and medication administration is now part of the course. However, you will find that more and more hospitals prefer to have BScN nurses and have no need for LPNS/RPNs except in areas such as phych and Long term. CNA's are not equivilent to PSW's... PSW go to school for one year to be able to assist thenurse in personal care... there is no vitals or medication involved. If you have a certificate for CNA, you will find it isn't equivilent to any type of worker here. Sorry.
    2) You have to have permission to write the exam if you are not a Permanent/Citizen or not on a student visa. Once you write the exam (3 months for everyone for results) you can then search for jobs... once you have a job offer you can then and only then apply for a work visa under NAFTA to move to Canada to work. There is yearly immigration garbage you have to do. Then once you have the job offer, & the workpermit you can then apply for you LIcsence. There is a temporary one for 6 months if all of your ducks aren't in order and/or your results aren't back, and then you get a permanent liscense which EXPIRES when your work visa expires. As it expires you can reapply as you get more work visas
    3) Once you have all of these things, if you want of fully immigrate to canada, then you apply for permanant status ($1500 and 3-6 months).

    Hope this information helps. Even though I went to school here and my work visa is for 2 years because of the new graduat programme, it was still a many many headaches. As a US citizen it is easier for us to work here than say someone from Europe/Asia.... but i can assure you there are many many headaches involved no matter what. An things get lost in the vortex known as the CNO....Copy everythng you send, and keep very detailed notes about who and when you speak to people.

    Also, for those looking to be outside of Toronto... Ottawa is desparate for nurses. check out The Ottawa Hospital on google

    Best of luck
    :angel2:
  5. by   Fiona59
    Well, lets see, Alberta is still producing diploma RN's and I believe they will do so until 2010. I have worked with PSW and CNA who taken med administration and vital sign procedures as part of their education but the facility employing them does not permit them to perform these "nursing" duties.

    LPN's are in demand in the west. We work in pretty much everywhere in active treatment except ICUs, PICUs,. We work Dialysis, OR, Orthopedic specialties. We are in school/public health.

    Yes we work LTC (pretty much the backbone there) and psych. They are even considering a Pych specialty.

    Don't write us off. The hospitals here would collapse without us. I guess Ontario really is a different world.
  6. by   nurse_ange1
    To Fiona59
    As described I gave factual information... Associates RN's are being phased out. Maybe Alberta is the last to phase them out. As I live and work in Ontario, I know those rules and regulations best. An RN is an RN, I don't really give one thought as to whether or not the RNs i'm working with are AD or BScN... I only care that they know how to do their job, take care of their patients, and know how to assist in an emergency. As a followup... you obviosly didn't read my post very well.... I said LPN's/RPNs are often not found in many acute care floors. If this fact offends you in some way, I'm sorry. It wasn't meant to offend you or anyone else... I was only offering factual information to those wanting to come to canada from the us from someone you has already done so... I don't recall where you said you were either in your post. I didn't write anyone off... Ontario is a different world with its own rules and regulations when it comes to Nursing.

    Oh... btw I was a health care aide for 3.5 years so don't even assume that I don't know what its like to be at the bottom of the totem pole. I also worked with many LPN/RPN that were good nurses and those that were just plain scary. I also worked with many NA's that had the potential to be very good nurses (regardless of the letters behind thier names). I firmly believe that a CNA or a PSW has no business giving medications.. i don't care how many inservices they have. If you want to give meds then become a nurse, either a RN or LPN/RPN. In acute hospitals in Ontario you will very likely not find either giving medications. In assisted living homes, half-way houses, LTC and other simular insituitions it is often practiced as a cost saving measurement.... one i don't support in the least. Somehow it just doesn't seem ethical or safe for a nurse to regardless of their education to be giving meds to 50 plus people.
    Last edit by Jay-Jay on Jan 30, '06
  7. by   nurse_clown
    Quote from Fiona59
    Don't write us off. The hospitals here would collapse without us. I guess Ontario really is a different world.
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]Funny you should say that. I'm an Ontario nurse. I'm an RN. I got my diploma from a college. Working on my BScN. Yes, I believe that Ontario is a different world. I just finished confusing myself at the Ontario Nurses Association web site. I work at a hospital ( who seems to be phasing out RPN's let alone PSW's) and then theres bill - 36 or something which has everyone running scared. I also work in Long Term Care and the union CUPE is fighting about someting else - and they're running scared. The region I work in is chaotic. I've been told by many, that the health care here "sucks" in this region. It's crazy. Have you been to the union sites? Totally different story. To me, BScN, RN, RPN, PSW, Health Care Aide, PCN - whatever.... In the broad scheme of things it doesn't matter who you are and what you do, none of us have any control over what goes on over here in Ontario. One day, an elderly woman who needs cataract surgery will have to bus herself to North Bay from Hamilton for surgery because the Ontario government wants to contract out services. Even now, we have to transport our Oncology patients by ambulance to another city (an hour trip) for Radiation treatment.

    Take a look at the Union sites then decide what you want to do....
  8. by   Fiona59
    It bothers me when someone who was educated and works in Ontario speaks for Canada as a whole.

    Healthcare is in a bit of a shambles in every province and the main thing to keep in mind is the best utilization of the healthcare dollar.

    If someone feels insecure its not me. I know my worth and I know the areas that myself and my friends work in. Luckily most of the RNs I've worked with in Alberta have been supportive of the LPNs that work alongside them.

    For so long in this country, Ontario has spoken "for the country" and given their opinions. They seem to forget there are other regions in the country. But I'm getting political, so I'll leave it at that.

    For the original poster check with the provincial governing body for RNs in the province you want to relocate to, they can answer your question the best.
  9. by   nurse_clown
    Quote from Fiona59
    It bothers me when someone who was educated and works in Ontario speaks for Canada as a whole.

    Healthcare is in a bit of a shambles in every province and the main thing to keep in mind is the best utilization of the healthcare dollar.

    If someone feels insecure its not me. I know my worth and I know the areas that myself and my friends work in. Luckily most of the RNs I've worked with in Alberta have been supportive of the LPNs that work alongside them.

    For so long in this country, Ontario has spoken "for the country" and given their opinions. They seem to forget there are other regions in the country. But I'm getting political, so I'll leave it at that.

    For the original poster check with the provincial governing body for RNs in the province you want to relocate to, they can answer your question the best.
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]You know Fiona, I suggest you READ the post before flying off the handle and responding so ignorantly. I believe you were refering to my post above. Where in it did I say that I speak FOR THE REST OF CANADA? I'm not even speaking for the whole of Ontario. I was just explaining the conditions in my REGION. And for your information the RN's and RPN's here work alongside each other in peace and harmony too. I'm not a political person and I shouldn't have to be.

    I don't know what your issue is Fiona with Ontario, but this is a nursing forum not an "I'll put in my cheap shots on politics" forum. This is no place for that. I'm merely explaining the some of the "stressors" that are going on here in Ontario and judging by your response Fiona, you don't understand it. I wasn't talking about Ontario vs THE REST OF CANADA. Ontario vs. THE WEST. or whatever... you didn't read my post correctly.
  10. by   Fiona59
    I wasn't referring to your post. It just happened to be above my reply to someone else. Check your pms

    I've lived through the cuts of the Klein government in the '90's and the current healthcare reorganizations going on in this province, so yes I do know stress.
  11. by   Jay-Jay
    Please, please ladies, MIND THE TOS! I am seeing rudeness here bordering on personal attacks, and am going to edit a post to keep this from going any further!

    Please let's discuss the TOPIC, and leave personal comments out of it!
  12. by   nurse_ange1
    Some members of the group feel disinfranchised by the health care in this country which varies from province to province--- one could even say from city to city or hospital to hospital as as all provinces are lead by different political parties which have different agenda's it isn't any wonder that healthcare varies from one region to another. I think that those of us in Canada can attest that things could be better, staffing ratios are herrendous, and there is a lack of respect and trust for the very hard, back breaking work we do. But I ask you, how in gods creation did a topic about coming to Canada from the US become a political referendum about who has better health care? The topic is about coming to canada from the US. I imagine that individual posts were based on their LIVED EXPERIENCE with the whole headache involved. As nurses I believe we are all familiar with lived experiences.... one persons experience with some illness can be drastically different than someone else. The same goes for dealing with the experience of coming to canada to work as a nurse.

    In case anyone hasn't figured it out... I was the person's post who was edited, and I recieved the duely earned warning. I went a bit over board with the critique and critism and failed to keep in mind politeness and constructiveness instead. I also forgot to take a deep breath before pressing send that final time. So, if there was anyone else I accidently offended then you have my appologies.

    I also want to reiterate that I fully appreciate nurse's work; I'm fully aware of how hard it is and how little rewarding it can be at times. It doesn't matter to me if a person I'm working with has 1, 2 or 4 years of education. All I care about is that we can all take care of the patients together and that we can respond to emergencies as they arise. Good an bad nurses are found with all sorts of alphabet soup after there name... one only hopes that they work with more good one's than bad one's. Enough said....

    The provincial nursing organizations and the college of nurses is the best source for information regarding working in canada as a nurse. Us, we just have our own lived experiences of the ordeal. Some good, some bad.

    :angel2:
    Last edit by nurse_ange1 on Jan 31, '06
  13. by   markjrn
    Quote from nurse_clown
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]You know Fiona, I suggest you READ the post before flying off the handle and responding so ignorantly. I believe you were refering to my post above. Where in it did I say that I speak FOR THE REST OF CANADA? I'm not even speaking for the whole of Ontario. I was just explaining the conditions in my REGION. And for your information the RN's and RPN's here work alongside each other in peace and harmony too. I'm not a political person and I shouldn't have to be.

    I don't know what your issue is Fiona with Ontario, but this is a nursing forum not an "I'll put in my cheap shots on politics" forum. This is no place for that. I'm merely explaining the some of the "stressors" that are going on here in Ontario and judging by your response Fiona, you don't understand it. I wasn't talking about Ontario vs THE REST OF CANADA. Ontario vs. THE WEST. or whatever... you didn't read my post correctly.
    Wow, that's harsh.

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