US nurses moving/moved to Canada - page 2

I have noticed reading over this forum that there are quite a few nurses here that have moved to Canada from the US, or are in the process. I am wondering, for those like me who are still trying to... Read More

  1. by   rhp123
    Quote from mattmend
    I took the permanent resident route (and am not actually a licensed US nurse yet). My permanent resident visa was just approved after applying in 04/04. I'll graudate from US school and write NCLEX in early June 06. And then relocate and work on temporary CNO permit while their process crawls at a snail's pace to allow me to write the Canadian licensure exam.

    Just my two cents.

    Matt
    Hi Matt:

    What is temporary CNO permit?

    I have a brochure from College of nurses of Ontario, it states that to be registered in Otario, one has to be a Canadian citizen or Permanent resident.
    Also, Ontario asks for BSN.

    Seems they are very restrict compared to the States. No state in US requires permanent residency or citizenship to get licensed, nor the BSN requirement. I am wondering why Ontario is so strict.
  2. by   mistoff
    I moved from Canada to New Mexico first in 1997 and requirements were a job confirmation, $56.00 and copy of your license to obtain a TN visa. I only needed to cross the border each year to have my Visa renewed.

    Since 1997, they have been talking about foreign nurses requiring the CGNSF validation. Well, as of July 2005, the CGNSF has been legislated as required for foreign nursing entry. That is why some people are being told it will now take 3-4 months.

    I have worked in the US for 8 years with a yearly visa. I went home to Canada for the summer and have moved back to New Mexico and the US immigration won't renew my TN unless I have the CGNSF. I called them which they are a credentially service that validates that foreign nurses have the equivilent education and English language skills of the US. They want $350.00 & you need to send them everything since high school for them to validate and provide you with the necessary visa screen now required for Canadians. They state it will take them 4-6 weeks to process this information

    For me the problem is that I was credential by another service a few years ago and in fact have finished my BSN nursing components in the US and am short 2 general electives to finish. CGNSF still requires me to pay them for the Visa screen

    I have a few weeks to decide what to do. I only live 20 minutes from the Mexican border so I am going to try to get the renewal without the CGNSF because I have also written NCLEX. This time I am applying for US Citizenship because I am unlikely to return again to Canada to nurse.

    The positive side--I have been an ED nurse for 20 years all over Canada and the US. The US provides you with better opportunities for advancement, better staffing, education funding etc. I went home for 8 months and decided I prefer US health care.

    Hope that helps.
    Jennifer

    Well, as of
  3. by   ghostcat
    [QUOTE=mistoff]The positive side--I have been an ED nurse for 20 years all over Canada and the US. The US provides you with better opportunities for advancement, better staffing, education funding etc. I went home for 8 months and decided I prefer US health care.

    /QUOTE]


    I am not so much moving to Canada for the nursing opportunities as I am for the political and social climate. We just happened to be lucky that I am a nurse and can work as a nurse there since that is one easier (comparatively) way to immigrate.
    I also think there are good and bad working conditions all over the world.
  4. by   control
    What if as in my situation, you are engaged to a Canadian residing in Canada. Would that complicate the process or simplify it?

    (yes the voice of desperation; I just can't live in TO without a JOB.
  5. by   control
    [QUOTE=ghostcat]
    Quote from mistoff
    The positive side--I have been an ED nurse for 20 years all over Canada and the US. The US provides you with better opportunities for advancement, better staffing, education funding etc. I went home for 8 months and decided I prefer US health care.

    /QUOTE]


    I am not so much moving to Canada for the nursing opportunities as I am for the political and social climate. We just happened to be lucky that I am a nurse and can work as a nurse there since that is one easier (comparatively) way to immigrate.
    I also think there are good and bad working conditions all over the world.

    Likewise!!!
  6. by   control
    Quote from spots
    If you want to work now, I'd say your best bet is to find work with a pharmaceutical company or a private company where you are not technically working as a registered nurse. As far as I know, the only way to work as a registered nurse in canada is to sit for the CRNE and register with the province, obtain a medical from an approved physician and wait for immigration to enter you into their system, and procure a job offer. The entire process has taken me about 10 months. You can get a temp work permit pending the CRNE but the medical and a job offer are requirements regardless and the wheels of immigration are slow. If time is of the essence I suggest you start now. Good luck, I hope your dream comes true! Canada is a wonderful country!

    So I've been looking at pharmaceutical companies. What exactly do registered nurses (or in my case RN in the US, regular person with 4 years exp in the field and a BSN )do for the company? Is it just particpating in research? Sales reps?
  7. by   justineJ
    Indeed Job Prospects Seems So Dull In Toronto,the Long Process Of The Work Permit And You Have To Have A Job Offer Damper All Efforts. Actually Makes You Wonder If You Made the right decision in choosing canada.
    Last edit by justineJ on Nov 21, '05
  8. by   mudiwa
    Do you have to have a BSN in order to practice as an RN in Canada?Also, how long does it take to transfer A USA RN license to a Canadian one.
  9. by   control
    Quote from mudiwa
    Do you have to have a BSN in order to practice as an RN in Canada?Also, how long does it take to transfer A USA RN license to a Canadian one.

    When you say "transfer" I think "by endorsement". Unfortunately, Canada doesn't allow licensure by endorsement for RNs in the USA. You have to take an exam and upon passing that exam (the name escapes me at the moment) you become licensed in the province you applied to practice in.

    I wish they did though. The job hunt would be much easier for me right now if so.
  10. by   mattmend
    And apparently it's dependent on education level in each province. You can't automatically just take their national licensing exam for RNs just because you're an RN in the United States. If you don't have what they deem enough hours of education for that particular province, you may be relegated to licensing as an RPN (think LPN) until you get the required hours of education or just get the required education before writing their RN exam. So long-story short, apparently you have to have the equivalent of a BSN in some provinces but not others. I'm going through this right now. Though I am only graduating with an associate degree in nursing and will take NCLEX-RN in June before moving to Canada, an would be an RN in the United States, I won't have enough hours of education in at least BC and Ontario to become licensed as an RN there. So, even though I was recently granted a permanent resident visa and have the immigration side tied up, the job hunt will be entirely different. If I choose to live in BC or Ontario, I'm going to have to get licensed as an RPN/LPN and gain the extra education part time until I can write their RN exam.

    Matt
  11. by   rhp123
    Quote from mattmend
    And apparently it's dependent on education level in each province. You can't automatically just take their national licensing exam for RNs just because you're an RN in the United States. If you don't have what they deem enough hours of education for that particular province, you may be relegated to licensing as an RPN (think LPN) until you get the required hours of education or just get the required education before writing their RN exam. So long-story short, apparently you have to have the equivalent of a BSN in some provinces but not others. I'm going through this right now. Though I am only graduating with an associate degree in nursing and will take NCLEX-RN in June before moving to Canada, an would be an RN in the United States, I won't have enough hours of education in at least BC and Ontario to become licensed as an RN there. So, even though I was recently granted a permanent resident visa and have the immigration side tied up, the job hunt will be entirely different. If I choose to live in BC or Ontario, I'm going to have to get licensed as an RPN/LPN and gain the extra education part time until I can write their RN exam.

    Matt
    Hi matt,

    In one way, it is not too bad they let you sit for RPN if you cannot have you RN there, at least you have something to go for and still work in a professional field!

    I have a Permanent Resident Card there too. Just curious, I'm wondering why wouldn't staying in the States at least you can work as an RN not a RPN, pay is much higher, and it is not difficult to find sponsorship if you need to. Overall, there are definitely way far more Canadian nurses moving to US than US nurses moving to Canada.
  12. by   mattmend
    Hi -

    No, I suppose you're right if there are RPN/LPN jobs to be had. They're being used less frequently here in the United States. As for not staying in the US, the decision to move to Canada was a conscious one unrelated to work, and had more to do with general shared values of Canadians, political climate there, my own values being more in line with theirs, etc.

    I suppose if there are a lot of RNs leaving Canada, job prospects there should increase?

    Regards -

    Matt
  13. by   rhp123
    Quote from mattmend
    Hi -

    No, I suppose you're right if there are RPN/LPN jobs to be had. They're being used less frequently here in the United States. As for not staying in the US, the decision to move to Canada was a conscious one unrelated to work, and had more to do with general shared values of Canadians, political climate there, my own values being more in line with theirs, etc.

    I suppose if there are a lot of RNs leaving Canada, job prospects there should increase?

    Regards -

    Matt
    Hi Matt,

    That is a quick reply!

    In most provinces in Canada, RPN programs are 2-years vs 1-year here in the States, seems PRN has higher "status" and higher "relatively pay" (not in absolute dollars) in Canada than in the States where they work mostly in nursing homes in US. I've seen plenty of Canadian Ads for RPNs to work in medical-surgical area.

    I see you in NYC, I'm in North NJ right now, I know AND programs around this area are highly competitive. Someday I need to move to Canada before the Permanenet resident card expires.

    I bet you're born in the States, I'm foreign born, ways of thinking are diffierent though! I understand and wsih you best luck in your future endeavors!

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